Hawke scopes? Has any try these or have any experience with them???

private fraser

Well-Known Member
It's horses for courses.

I have an sr pro multi-aim point on my .22lr so I can shoot accurately out to 100 yards. It's great bunny getter.
If it's for a stalking rifle though, I'd go for one of the good european makes, even if it is second hand.

What do you have in mind for it?.
 

Timney

Well-Known Member
I have a Hawke Night Eye 3-9 on my .22lr. It does the job, but the clarity compared to European scopes is pretty poor. I get a hazy sight picture compared to my other scopes, and for this reason I would not recommend one. Another option worth considering if the budget is tight is the MTC Viper or Taipan. These are pretty clean optics for the money, but you will not go wrong with Minox, Meopta, or the other better known European makers depending on your budget.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
You don't say what size, magnification, cartridge, rifle or intended use for your rifle.

I put a Hawke Sport HD 4x32mm Mil Dot on a .30-30 to test loads, and was so impressed that I mounted it on a .22 LR, bought another for myself, and gave one to a friend for his 10/22. It has an etched reticle, and as others note, the dots let you range and shoot to 100 yards.

I just ordered a 2-7x32 AO Mil Dot for a nice bolt action .22 which is very accurate with Eley or Federal GM Match.
 

Alistair

Well-Known Member
I have used a few different Hawke optics at various different price points on air rifles over the years, and have generally been impressed. They do the job out to 50 odd yards on rabbits, crows etc and I have used one to shoot coke cans at 120yds without any problems. They are durable and good value throughout the range. Having said that, as above, the MTC stuff, in particular the Taipan range is far superior optically and in terms of build quality, at the cost of an approx 30% price increase for an identical spec. If you want to use it for bunnies on a rimfire or an air rifle either will be an excellent choice, just don't expect 'european' scope levels of performance in low light or longer ranges. I wouldn't use on on a stalking rifle at all, and I don't know if they are rated for centre fire recoil anyway.
hope this helps,
Alistair
 

Bladerunner

Well-Known Member
Hi there

Thanks for the quick responses, I will be doing mainly woodland stalking and will be on a tikka 6.5x55 or .270 still undecided on rifle and as budget plays a part I could narrow my choices if I look at budget scopes? its unlikely that I'll be taking a shot out further than 150m.

My thinking is that I could get a more expensive rifle to get going and then replace the scope with time. I'll probably a one rifle stalker and if needs be I can wait to buy....
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Re the good european 'scopes...they hold their value pretty damn well.
Can't say the same for the budget scope market if you buy new then look to sell after a while.
A s/h Schmidt could actually work out cheaper.
Keep an eye on here, some good scopes/prices
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
,,,,, I will be doing mainly woodland stalking and will be on a tikka 6.5x55 or .270 still undecided on rifle and as budget plays a part I could narrow my choices if I look at budget scopes? its unlikely that I'll be taking a shot out further than 150m.

My thinking is that I could get a more expensive rifle to get going and then replace the scope with time. I'll probably a one rifle stalker and if needs be I can wait to buy....
I would have no qualms about mounting a 1 inch tube Hawke Sport HD 4x40mm Mil Dot and get to shooting. It is so inexpensive ( 1/10 the price of an entry Zeiss).
Then take your time and look for a deal on a something like a Leupold, Zeiss or Kahles 6x42, if 6 is not too much power for your in-the-woods hunting.
 

Bart308

Well-Known Member
I had a hawk 30mm tube 3-10x50 (I think) with illuminated ret. Was ok for what I paid (bought 2nd hand so cheap to start) used it on rimfire and .308 and it worked well. Lost vision a good while earlier than mates bushnell elite or leupold at dusk and no comparison against a zeiss and not great in gloomy condition but was more than ok for day and on a lamp.
Did find the red dot a bit blured even when turned down so never bothered with it.
A good scope for the money but I would say I much prefer the bushnell and weaver scopes I currently have (and they can be picked up for not much more than a hawke), and when the kids stop eating my cash would love somthing top end and german.
 

MARCBO

Well-Known Member
I once ordered a new Leupold Fixed 6X42 that I was able to directly compare with a Kahles 6X42. Between the two I could not see a bit of difference. The problem is people are often comparing apples and oranges...

SS
 

AN DU RU FOX

Well-Known Member
have a look at the nikon 4x16x42 at uttings/sportsman g centre 3oo quid and top quality glass, i also have a hawke no probs with it but its on my rimmie.
 

.30-06

Well-Known Member
Personally I feel that Hawke's lower end up to some of their mid-range stuff represents excellent value for money, provided you are realistic in your expectations.


Their mid-to-'high' range stuff is where it all falls down for me. Prices seem to reflect 'stuff' instead of clarity and a bright image. A bit pointless IMHO having a bunch of gadgets and whatnot if you sacrifice image quality along the way.


I tried a x50 Hawke Panorama on one of my air rifles and found that a smaller and similarly priced x40 Nikon Prostaff gave over half an hour more when head shooting pigeons in woodland.


I wouldn't make a Hawke scope my first choice for woodland stalking, but you can make anything work for you with the right approach and mentality.


If you don't want to spend much on a scope, invest in decent bins, if you can.


I've always argued in favour of being able to spot quarry and then take the shot. Taking the shot can be done with an inexpensive scope, but spotting the quarry first is the real trick, so either lots of practice coupled with excellent eyesight or lots of practice and decent bins.


One point worth mentioning here - a lot of good scopes can struggle in woodland, and not even in dawn/dusk conditions. Dappled sunlight can be especially challenging for some scopes - I got rid of a Bushnell Elite a few years ago that was terrible for this and some FT air rifle shooters often comment on how poorly some scopes do under these conditions, regardless of price point.


My uncle does a load of woodland hunting in Canada and he either uses open sights with fibre optic or flourescent dots on them for fast target acquisition, or he uses a small but very clear and bright x32 Bushnell scope.


I remember him saying to me years ago that the last thing you want in thick cover in bear country is a big scope...


:)
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I'm very pleased with the Hawke on my rimfire, and would have put one on my .243 if I could have found the model I wanted at the right price at the right time.
However, as has been said elsewhere above, I think their lower spec models represent much better value for money. The higher priced ones seem to be over priced for what they are.
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
Re my earlier post. You ask if I've had other scopes. the answer is yes! At present I have a Swaro; Minox, Leupold and the Hawkes. all mounted and used. Of course the Swarovski at the thick end of £2000 is better then a Hawke at £200 but is it ten times better, No! All these scopes do the job depending on what you want them for, but in truth the Hawkes are extremely good value for money
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't spend £200 on a Hawke scope and I certainly wouldn't put one on a .270 unless you like checking zero a lot

they are rimfire and air rifle scopes at best IMO
given you can get a Meopta, Leupold or even S&B and Zeiss for £200 if you hunt around I would seriously advise you buy decent 2nd hand simple engineering rather than cheap bells and whistles cr@p
 

Milligan

Well-Known Member
I think I've got one on my finnfire, does the rudimentary job.
imo, you are better off stretching for better, Nikon is one of the most underrated scope brands out there
 

bobjs

Well-Known Member
lets not beat about the bush.

they are not very good, save up a bit more and buy once it will save on tears and disgust later.

bob.
 

Tuck

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't spend £200 on a Hawke scope and I certainly wouldn't put one on a .270 unless you like checking zero a lot

they are rimfire and air rifle scopes at best IMO
given you can get a Meopta, Leupold or even S&B and Zeiss for £200 if you hunt around I would seriously advise you buy decent 2nd hand simple engineering rather than cheap bells and whistles cr@p


I had a Hawke sidewinder on my 25-06 very recently and in fact I still have it. But now have a Leupold on it I used it as a bit of stop gap as I found myself scopeless for a minute, it was on there for around a month and I gave it some stick, I never touched it after initial zero, was very impressed with it for the money don't get me wrong it was no Zeiss but it didn't have a zeiss price tag, I wouldn't think twice about putting it on another centrefire rifle and the reticle is very nice also, I was pleased with the way it performed and it certainly owes me nothing...
 

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