Heaviest Red Stag

Cadex

Well-Known Member
If for no other reason other than to satisfy my curiosity, does anyone know the weight of the heaviest red stag shot in the UK?

I've saw some absolute brutes grassed during the last season and it's just occurred to me that I have no idea who actually holds the record, and the weight etc.


Photos obviously well received :D



Sorry I probably should have asked for heaviest larder weight on the hook, would have made things simpler and clearer :D
 
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jubnut

Well-Known Member
This will be an interesting thread. 168kg is my heaviest, have heard of stags going over 170.
 

novice

Well-Known Member
A mate of mine had a stag off martindale that went just over 28 stone. That was back at the larder, so I assume it was with at least the green bag out (I'd have to confirm with him). I know he had one that he felt was heavier, which fell in an awkward spot and they had to cut him up to get him back home. I'm sure chrisc could expand as he was guiding that day.

They were both wild Cumbrian stags. No doubt someone will have shot a lowland beast or a Parker that went heavier, but fantastic animals all the same.

novice
 

6pointer

Account Suspended
Mungo the story is really to long and involved a years wait a pour shot a good lurcher a hernia and a brush with the law. Not to be repeated.

one His boy a year later.
 

cyberstag

Well-Known Member
Boys please please, if you must measure the size of your willies remember this is 2015. Stones? Larder weight? Green left in? Green out? This is all meaningless unless there are facts. Nobody seems to be comparing like with like. What are you weighing with? are the scales accurate? or is it just somebodies guess?
 

novice

Well-Known Member
No willy waving here. The op asked a question and I chipped in with some info. At the end of the day a mature red stag is an impressive animal, regardless of his eventual weight on the hook.

novice
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Boys please please, if you must measure the size of your willies remember this is 2015. Stones? Larder weight? Green left in? Green out? This is all meaningless unless there are facts. Nobody seems to be comparing like with like. What are you weighing with? are the scales accurate? or is it just somebodies guess?
In Scotland at least stag weights are recorded in Stones and pounds, though dealer weights are in KG, larder weight is as goes to dealer gralloch pluck removed and head and legs off, green in or out green is the green gralloch the stomach, but not the pluck ie heart lungs etc, and yes larder scales are pretty accurate.
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
Boys please please, if you must measure the size of your willies remember this is 2015. Stones? Larder weight? Green left in? Green out? This is all meaningless unless there are facts. Nobody seems to be comparing like with like. What are you weighing with? are the scales accurate? or is it just somebodies guess?

Maybe it's just better to go with the CIC medal scores as published in the Sporting Times........but hell what a price for that comic!
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
You can't really compare hill stags, and Lowland stags there is a vast difference in weight anything over 20st for a hill stag is big.

While I have had several that have topped that weight , my largest was in 1987 shot by an American client, to cut a long story short, ( I did provide more details of this stag in a previous post some time ago) it had to be left out over night, the client was leaving that day and wanted to take the cape with him, so had to cape it on the hill.

The stag weighed 23st or 322lbs if you prefer when hung on the scales in the larder the following day , any beast looses weight after death, common practise is to add a pound for every stone in weight if a beast has had to be left out overnight, while not exact this is pretty accurate, the fact that this stag was caped leaving more of the carcass
unprotected by the skin, would mean it lost a bit more than normal, which would have made this beast around about 25 st larder weight add on the weight of the head and cape,and the gralloch both red and green and you would have a beast with a live weight in the high 20s bracket, a big beast for the open hill indeed.

Nutty spaniel from this forum still has nightmares about it I think:rofl: as he helped me drag it off the hill the day after it was shot.
 

cyberstag

Well-Known Member
Thanks for clearing up some of the confusion Bogtrotter, I suppose I am lucky in that I can put all my stags across the scales live, and at different times of the year so it means I have accurate info on killing out percentages as well. Most of my stags are 80-100 kilos less now than just before the rut. (and it's not for lack of food)
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
Biggest I shot was a 10 pointer back in 2001
girth on the antlers was very thick for a hill stag so I knew he was a monster

Full gralloch, pluck out, all roped up, went to pull him down the slope and he wouldn't move!!
thought i was being soft!
couldn't shift him, managed to get him about 10 ft before we figured we really needed the quad!

weighed in at 20.5 stone head and legs off (130kg/287lb)
easily put him up in the high 300lb region as an entire beast
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
malcolm026.jpgEuropean Stag009.jpg

The photo on the left is of 2 park stags, the picture on the right is a wild stag from Northumberland. I will try and look up the weights, both clients were American clients of mine. The stag on the right was responsible for killing 2 other wild stags in the rut and was nicknamed Rocky on the estate.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Thanks for clearing up some of the confusion Bogtrotter, I suppose I am lucky in that I can put all my stags across the scales live, and at different times of the year so it means I have accurate info on killing out percentages as well. Most of my stags are 80-100 kilos less now than just before the rut. (and it's not for lack of food)
I am really not that surprised a wild hill stag can loose anything up to a fifth of his body weight during the rut, and of course by the end of the rut,the growing season is well past with not a lot for them to eat leaving them in the worst possible condition to face the oncoming winter, in these high places there is seldom much new growth before the month of May, by which time they can be in quite poor condition, though many but not all estates supply some supplementary feeding in winter.
 

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