Height of fence to keep out roe

J@son

Well-Known Member
One of my permissions has just erected a deer proof fence to keep the roe (and MJ) out of an area used for growing veg, salad and saplings. The fence has been installed well. Posts are solid and well spaced. Stock netting is well tensioned. But... it is only 5ft 6inches high - perhaps 6ft at some points but not consistently. This struck me as too low to keep out the roe and it looks as though from the recent damage to some saplings they have wasted no time in getting in. How high does a fence need to be to keep out the roe? And, what is a sensible solution to a fence that is too low. I realise two strands of barbed wire along the top is not a good option as deer can get caught in this. Is two strands of plain wire equally dangerous? Advice please! No fallow in the area. Just roe (and MJ).
 

riflerob

Well-Known Member
Two strands of anything is asking for disaster - unless it's got fixed bars halfway along each piece to prevent the wires wrapping up
 

AGR

Well-Known Member
I have watched a roe jump my 6ft release pen gate from standing. I also once knew, probably 20 years ago,a chap tasked with clearing the roe from a fenced (6ft high) farm. A few years later he was still at it.
Someone is being optimistic!
However, if said fence were to be curved, then generally I think it could work. My observations are that most small deer will follow a curved fence, but will try to jump a straight one. Mind you, filling the fenced area with with delicious salads is akin to ground baiting!
 

StephenToast

Well-Known Member
I've seen muntjac jump panel fences nearly six foot high so I wouldn't be confident the fence is high enough to keep them out let alone roe.

Mind you the muntjac was being chased by a fat labrador at the time so it was fairly well motivated. Not sure they'd attempt it otherwise.

You'll most likely find they'll push underneath if the bottom wire isn't or low tight enough or there isn't a skirt or through any holes that are opened up by badgers etc rather than hop over.
 

Overlay

Well-Known Member
Some say 1.5 mtrs is the correct height. If it works it’s all good. - I’ve recently completed a 170 mtr x 1.8 mtr fence against Roe and Muntjac which worked perfectly in the UV resistant plastic deer fencing with four wire support tensioned and hog ringed with the bottom wire run after hog ringing pinned into position every 2 ‘, I run a couple of stealth cameras on it for a month and nothing has gone over just along it and hasn’t bothered with the fence at all
The material is really easy to work with and very adaptable to ground undulation, worth a look if it suits, it looks really good and works with a long life on the materials

deer under duress will as I’ve seen take on any fence if they have to in an effort to get away
 
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User00026

Well-Known Member
1.8-2m will work, 1.5m and you should have given the money to charity.
I’ve seen many 2m+ fences, and they still get through…it. ALWAYS get through! Usually under (even opening up a badger or rabbit run) or squeezing open wiring to push through at a joining section.

better off spending the money on something useful and asking someone who enjoys it to manage the deer…unless the fencing is a subsidy driven initiative of course, then all the tax payers will gladly pay for your fencing 😯 😂
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
I well remember seeing a Roe on the "outside" of a Red Deer fence (1.8m) up in Sutherland.

As I made my way towards the forest gate, I will have winded the Roe.

I saw him, from a standing start, leap that 1.8m fence with ease.
 
One of my permissions has just erected a deer proof fence to keep the roe (and MJ) out of an area used for growing veg, salad and saplings. The fence has been installed well. Posts are solid and well spaced. Stock netting is well tensioned. But... it is only 5ft 6inches high - perhaps 6ft at some points but not consistently. This struck me as too low to keep out the roe and it looks as though from the recent damage to some saplings they have wasted no time in getting in. How high does a fence need to be to keep out the roe? And, what is a sensible solution to a fence that is too low. I realise two strands of barbed wire along the top is not a good option as deer can get caught in this. Is two strands of plain wire equally dangerous? Advice please! No fallow in the area. Just roe (and MJ).

Firstly check and make sure they're not coming under the fence rather than over. If they are coming under then you might consider a turned-out ground skirt. Peel back the turf or a bit of topsoil and lightly bury it. If they are coming over then they'll need to look at adding brackets to kick the top out and adding some rabbit wire or plain HT, etc.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Also check the size of the mesh,deer fencing usef on forestry plantations against Red deer access are no real deterrent to Roe they will jump through the mesh when they get used to it they can do it at full gallop.
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
In my experience fences are a waste of time for roe, they will quite quickly find a way under or through them.

I have very limited experience of muntjac but assume those little beggars are even worse!
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
I've seen muntjac jump panel fences nearly six foot high so I wouldn't be confident the fence is high enough to keep them out let alone roe.

Mind you the muntjac was being chased by a fat labrador at the time so it was fairly well motivated. Not sure they'd attempt it otherwise.

They will!

I used to stalk an organic farm that had an 6' enclosure that was supposedly deer proof. I watched a muntjac buck leap the fence from a standing start.
 

Jelen

Well-Known Member
I well remember seeing a Roe on the "outside" of a Red Deer fence (1.8m) up in Sutherland.

As I made my way towards the forest gate, I will have winded the Roe.

I saw him, from a standing start, leap that 1.8m fence with ease.
Yes, the same here. Saw a Roe kid in the inside of a 1.8m security fence. As I observed it from my high seat a Doe came along the outside of the fence.
I sat there wondering what would happen when the doe, from a standing position, cleared the fence to get inside. No hesitation at all.
 
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