6.5x55

Well-Known Member
hello there,

i got offered loads of lee reloading gear for the 6.5x55 ; bench, press, dies, auto prime, powder measure, safety scales cases, 120 bt bullets, primers, case length tool, primer pocket thing, lube pad lube, for £150 so i thort i cant go wrong, so brought it.

but how easy it is to homeload? and what would be the best powder for 6.5x55? and how much of it? any suggestions would be very welcome
 

lordy

Well-Known Member
STOP the one thing I don't see on that list is a manual. Read read and read up some more. Learning about reloading, ballistics and the process will give you a understanding of what you are undertaking and keep you safe.

​I almost think this could be a wind up with questions of how much powder to use??
 

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
Depending upon the make will determine the price. I assume they are Lee scales as they call theirs "safety Scales" so is the rest Lee or is it other makes?

Without knowing the make one cannot in all honesty comment on the price being good or not.
 

6.5x55

Well-Known Member
Depending upon the make will determine the price. I assume they are Lee scales as they call theirs "safety Scales" so is the rest Lee or is it other makes?

Without knowing the make one cannot in all honesty comment on the price being good or not.

every thing is lee, a mate brought it but then decided he couldn't be asked to reload so then asked me if i wanted to buy it, its brand new never been used... and lordy nope there isnt a manual, but im reading up as much as i can on the internet, and the question on how much powder is because i don't want to start silly low an it take ages to work up to the best round, and nor do i want to put too much in and blow my self up..... any help and advice would be very welcome.....
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
bench, - ?
press, - £30-70
dies, - £20-30
auto prime, -£15-20
powder measure, - £10-15
safety scales cases, -£10
120 bt bullets, ? how many what brand
primers, ? £30-40/1000
case length tool, £5
primer pocket thing, £2
lube pad lube £10-15

£150 could be a bargain depending on what you have bought, or it could be what he paid for it new.

depending on powder and bullets you need data
you also need to take the advice and read the hell out of all things around the basics of internal ballistic (what happens when it goes bang!)
and external ballistics (what happens when it exits the metal tube!)

books are a good start and nice to thumb through in front of a open fire
the web has numerous places to look
start with the producers of the components
 

limulus

Well-Known Member
You'd do far worse than to read the overview at the top of this section.
Powder wise you could go to the Lapua website:

VV 6.5x55

and use that as a start.

Whatever you do, please do read and, if possible, get someone local to show you the ropes prior to starting your journey......oh, nearly forgot...the most important thing now is to grow a large moustache and develop a disdainful look (think car mechanic look when you ask him about your big end) so you can talk to others about reloading :)
 

6.5x55

Well-Known Member
bench, - ?
press, - £30-70
dies, - £20-30
auto prime, -£15-20
powder measure, - £10-15
safety scales cases, -£10
120 bt bullets, ? how many what brand
primers, ? £30-40/1000
case length tool, £5
primer pocket thing, £2
lube pad lube £10-15

£150 could be a bargain depending on what you have bought, or it could be what he paid for it new.

depending on powder and bullets you need data
you also need to take the advice and read the hell out of all things around the basics of internal ballistic (what happens when it goes bang!)
and external ballistics (what happens when it exits the metal tube!)

books are a good start and nice to thumb through in front of a open fire
the web has numerous places to look
start with the producers of the components


the 120 bt are nosler, and 200 of them and its sounds like you know alot more about this than i do, so what book would be best? and how far are you from jed? an hour ish?
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
find some one to give you hands with a how too on hand loading ! we don't wish you to have an accident , any one live nr you on the site ?
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Millions of reloaders have read the "how to" sections of reloading manuals and gotten by quite nicely on their own. If a person is literate and follows instructions there will be no accidents while making serviceable ammunition. Very experienced reloaders can confound a beginner with advice. I have always felt that if properly instructed, a new reloader should walk away from his first session saying, "WTF?? THAT'S IT???" There should be no talk of distance from the lands or bumping or neck sizing... just FL resize, trim, prime, charge, seat to specified OAL. Right out of the book with starting charges for the powder selected. No one should be taught without their OWN reloading manual open in front of them. When they have demonstrated those basics just tip your hat and leave them to shoot. Tell them to use the same load next time they reload as well so that there are no new variables when they are reloading alone. I have taught many people how to reload and this technique has never failed to get the newbie up and running solo with as little confusion as possible.~Muir
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
every thing is lee, a mate brought it but then decided he couldn't be asked to reload so then asked me if i wanted to buy it, its brand new never been used... and lordy nope there isnt a manual, but im reading up as much as i can on the internet, and the question on how much powder is because i don't want to start silly low an it take ages to work up to the best round, and nor do i want to put too much in and blow my self up..... any help and advice would be very welcome.....

Hi, your actually just as likely to have a serious accident if you load your cases with too little powder; did you know that ?
If you use the wrong powder you can also put yourself in danger just as you can if you put in too much powder.
Reloading is really simple, it is no 'dark art' there is nothing even remotely complicated about it, its about as hard as cooking a meal; providing you follow some very basic, yet essential, guidelines.
The best thing for you to do is to go onto Amazon and buy yourself a book called the ABC's Of Reloading, this will show you how to, or more importantly, why you have to, perform the procedures that are necessary when reloading.
If you read and learn this short and simple book, it will give you a good foundation of knowledge to work with. It is important to learn properly from the start as then you won't be tempted to use thoroughly wrong and misguided offers of information by, well meaning but poorly educated, individuals in the future.

Kind regards, Olaf
 

Archer

Well-Known Member
Millions of reloaders have read the "how to" sections of reloading manuals and gotten by quite nicely on their own. If a person is literate and follows instructions there will be no accidents while making serviceable ammunition. Very experienced reloaders can confound a beginner with advice. I have always felt that if properly instructed, a new reloader should walk away from his first session saying, "WTF?? THAT'S IT???" There should be no talk of distance from the lands or bumping or neck sizing... just FL resize, trim, prime, charge, seat to specified OAL. Right out of the book with starting charges for the powder selected. No one should be taught without their OWN reloading manual open in front of them. When they have demonstrated those basics just tip your hat and leave them to shoot. Tell them to use the same load next time they reload as well so that there are no new variables when they are reloading alone. I have taught many people how to reload and this technique has never failed to get the newbie up and running solo with as little confusion as possible.~Muir

Well said!
 

NeilG

Well-Known Member
hello there,

i got offered loads of lee reloading gear for the 6.5x55 ; bench, press, dies, auto prime, powder measure, safety scales cases, 120 bt bullets, primers, case length tool, primer pocket thing, lube pad lube, for £150 so i thort i cant go wrong, so brought it.

but how easy it is to homeload? and what would be the best powder for 6.5x55? and how much of it? any suggestions would be very welcome

At the top of the Ammo, RELOADING, and Ballistics Forum page is a Sticky Post, called `READ THIS`..... It might point you in the direction you need, and has pictures and everything...

Once you have read that, then you can determine how you go forward from there.

Reloading is good fun, and very satisfying, but you must have a routine, and do the basics well...

All the best.

Neil.
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
Buy a copy of Richard Lees `Modern Reloading` second edition.
Information for the 6.5 X 55 cartridge starts on page 314.
You will also find info.on the equipment you may purchase.

I can supply a virtually new copy post paid for £20 if required.

HWH.
 
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jonathanj

Active Member
In my experience 120g nosler bt's & viht n160 is a good place to start with this round for accuracy but you don't say what the rifle is used for. Reloading accurate rounds safely is one thing. Bullet choice for live game is another area to be understood.
 

Harry mac

Well-Known Member
Millions of reloaders have read the "how to" sections of reloading manuals and gotten by quite nicely on their own. If a person is literate and follows instructions there will be no accidents while making serviceable ammunition. Very experienced reloaders can confound a beginner with advice. I have always felt that if properly instructed, a new reloader should walk away from his first session saying, "WTF?? THAT'S IT???" There should be no talk of distance from the lands or bumping or neck sizing... just FL resize, trim, prime, charge, seat to specified OAL. Right out of the book with starting charges for the powder selected. No one should be taught without their OWN reloading manual open in front of them. When they have demonstrated those basics just tip your hat and leave them to shoot. Tell them to use the same load next time they reload as well so that there are no new variables when they are reloading alone. I have taught many people how to reload and this technique has never failed to get the newbie up and running solo with as little confusion as possible.~Muir
Halleluya!!! +1 Buy a manual and read it.
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
​I must say that I started out reloading without a manual, there is loads of info on the net and of course on SD which will see you right. Having said that getting a manual is still a very good idea.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
​I must say that I started out reloading without a manual, there is loads of info on the net and of course on SD which will see you right. Having said that getting a manual is still a very good idea.

The Internet sucks. Knowledge by referendum VS an at-hand source where the author is expert enough to be paid for his or her work. No offense, but not studying a manual is laziness; it's like copying someone else's homework assignment when you were at school. People spend hundreds on loading gear but not $20 for a manual detailing it's use? Nonsense. IMHO there is no excuse for not having a manual.~Muir
 

Hornet

Well-Known Member
Millions of reloaders have read the "how to" sections of reloading manuals and gotten by quite nicely on their own. If a person is literate and follows instructions there will be no accidents while making serviceable ammunition. Very experienced reloaders can confound a beginner with advice. I have always felt that if properly instructed, a new reloader should walk away from his first session saying, "WTF?? THAT'S IT???" There should be no talk of distance from the lands or bumping or neck sizing... just FL resize, trim, prime, charge, seat to specified OAL. Right out of the book with starting charges for the powder selected. No one should be taught without their OWN reloading manual open in front of them. When they have demonstrated those basics just tip your hat and leave them to shoot. Tell them to use the same load next time they reload as well so that there are no new variables when they are reloading alone. I have taught many people how to reload and this technique has never failed to get the newbie up and running solo with as little confusion as possible.~Muir
Spot on as usual Muir, I have taught a few to reload and applied the same principles, safe and simple as possible, depending on what powder you want to use or can source locally, have a look on Hodgdon reloading data centre, you will find lots of data for your 6.5 my pal has a Tikka t3 in this calibre and we find Hodgdon h414 works very well in his rifle, good luck mate and welcome to the darkside:scared:
 

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