Hide making kit/process

mn87

Active Member
Hi all, I’m interested in trying to make my own hide this year. Can anyone point me in the right direction of books or kits that may help along the way? Or any advice welcome

It will be a roe buck, I’m more interested in the process and outcome rather than size or value for money

cheers

M
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
Hi all, I’m interested in trying to make my own hide this year. Can anyone point me in the right direction of books or kits that may help along the way? Or any advice welcome

It will be a roe buck, I’m more interested in the process and outcome rather than size or value for money

cheers

M
Plenty of ideas and diagrams on here, If you are handy with a saw and some nails there are some very good high seats illustrated at very little cost.
Unfortunately I am not very PC literate so am not able to link to any previous posts but you should be able to find them if you scroll through.
 

mn87

Active Member
Plenty of ideas and diagrams on here, If you are handy with a saw and some nails there are some very good high seats illustrated at very little cost.
Unfortunately I am not very PC literate so am not able to link to any previous posts but you should be able to find them if you scroll through.
Thanks, was meaning a skin/throw/rug type of hide rather than a hide for shooting!

I looked up previous threads about ‘tanning’ but see that only caused the usual argument that tanning was making leather (I.e no fur)
 

Silvius

Well-Known Member
This reply is probably too late to be any use but the K tan kits are very good starting points for Chrome and Alum tans. If you want to fix hair, then formic acid will do better than the citric acid I think they use. If you are taking the hair off, then potassium hydroxide is a bit milder than sodium hydroxide it feels and a lot cleaner than the hard wood ash that one needs to use to feel properly traditional.

Buy a lot of quite finely ground salt if you are salting it first.

Having the fleshing knife pretty blunt is important, the right bluntness may take some experimentation...

"Deer skins to buckskins" is great advice for making buckskin.

In my opinion all taning is harder than it looks to start. This is simply because its quite a lot of time and work and you just don't know until you try quite how you are supposed to do something optimally. It is pretty good going to get a satisfactory result first time, so if you are as slow a learner as me at it, don't be put off. Its just as case of committing to doing it with a few hides and it gets easier.
 
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