How close is a complete ban on shooting?

basil

Distinguished Member
ANIMAL rights campaigners have vowed to continue disrupting grouse shooting on Ilkley Moor after councillors rejected their pleas to ban it.
Members of Bradford Council’s executive committee today voted unanimously to allow the controversial shooting of grouse on the council-owned land to continue.
The committee decided to ban the use of traps on the moor used to kill bird predators such as stoats, weasels and other small mammals.
This was welcomed by campaign group Ban Bloodsports on Ilkley Moor which helped raise over 1,000 signatures in favour of a ban on grouse shooting.
The council decision means that the Bingley Moor Partnership can continue running grouse shoots until 2018 when the current agreement expires.
The Partnership pays the council £10,000 a year for the right to shoot grouse which partly funds the authority’s Countryside and Rights of Way service.
Senior partner at the Partnership, Edward Bromet, said he was delighted with the decision to allow grouse shooting to continue.
He said the other methods of pest control would be used to control predators.
Some pests could be controlled with shooting, he said, while trapping could still be used off Ilkley Moor.
Mr Bromet was critical of “extreme” elements of the anti grouse shooting campaign, saying they were “emotionally against shooting”.
He suggested that their campaign may actually result in more shooting because of increased demand to control pests.
“There’s an irony here. There is no logic to what they were trying to do.”
He said the campaigners had “wasted” the time of the council in calling for a review.
Mr Bromet said those who had opposed the shooting of grouse had previously committed aggravated at trespass on at least six shoots, in August last year, on Partnership land, although he said there had been no disruption to the shooting on Ilkley Moor.
Members of the group Ban Bloodsports on Ilkley Moor were putting a brave face on the defeat.
A spokesman said shooting and management activity on the moor had resulted in reduced biodiversity.
Continuing shooting until 2018 would deplete grouse numbers, he said.
“We condemn the decision to allow it to continue until 2018, given this will decimate the population of red grouse, an amber listed species awarded international protection.”
The organisation vowed to step up its campaign and is expected to disrupt grouse shooting in August.
The spokesman said today’s decision was the first step towards ending grouse shooting in 2018.
“We raise concerns that the continuation of shooting itself will result in the depletion of the red grouse population of Ilkley Moor and fails to address conflicts with moor users.”
He claimed allowing shooting on the moor was incompatible with the council’s obligation to allow open access.
“We will return to City Hall to address this and intervene to prevent shoots from taking place during the 2015 season in order to uphold the 1906 Act.”
The spokesman said that future disruption of shoots would take the form of “lawful direct action.”
Supporters of Ban Bloodsports on Ilkley Moor took to its Facebook page to show their disappointment.
One said: “They are named wildlife for a reason - not to be killed in their natural habitat.”
Another said: “Without predator control they will struggle to get the numbers of grouse they need to make shooting viable. I suspect shooting will stop long before 2018.”
 

goathunter1

Well-Known Member
Interested to note that grouse are rated amber, given the enormous bags being shot in recent years. Good luck to the lads at Ilkely/Bingley. I hope they have some great shooting but it must be a pain with sabs. I've only experienced it once and we managed to wind them up good style!
 

Blackpowder

Well-Known Member
Ban grouse shooting and its management and see how long grouse stocks last. I would give it two years at most.

Blackpowder
 

howy308

Well-Known Member
is this just on coucil or government land Basil? Surely any ban would have to go through European parliment
 

Rake Aboot

Well-Known Member
They don`t care about Grouse numbers, they just don`t want shooting in any form.
If the moor was barren but with no shooting, they would be happy.
It`s nothing to do with animal welfare, it`s simply a hate of shooting.
 

basil

Distinguished Member
They don`t care about Grouse numbers, they just don`t want shooting in any form.
If the moor was barren but with no shooting, they would be happy.
It`s nothing to do with animal welfare, it`s simply a hate of shooting.
If they succeeded in banning Grouse shooting what form of shooting is next on the list?
 

woodmaster

Well-Known Member
Worrying times. I always get annoyed when things are referred to as being "council owned". That means WE own it. So I see no good reason why one user group should have more say over it's use than another. Until shooting is banned totally within the uk then we have as much right to go about our lawful activity as any other group.
So I would be very worried if a council or government body were to prevent shooting on ground owned by the people as that would be the beginning of a total eradication of hunting within the country.
 

tozzybum

Well-Known Member
remember rent a crowd dont give a flying fish what the law decides unless its in their favour.they enjoy attacking people in their hoodies knowing theyl get away with it .by the time any police respond due to woefully inadequate funding in rural ruralshire theyre at home eating tofu n drinking meade.they have just publicly threatened violence against the shoot .will they be warned NO.will the police be able to come and monitor their activities NO.the accountants are in charge.the police know its wrong ,the council know its wrong but 13 years of P.C labour rubbish has reduced their powers and ability to act.
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
Bradford Council bought the moor many years back when under Labour control to facilitate public access but also to stop shooting for political reasons. After taking the land on, it has gone badly downhill through lack of management and was being steadily ruined through bracken infestation and suchlike, the heather condition deteriorating through lack of burning .......

Even the council and some members of the public realised after some years that the moor is at risk and the council employed environmental consultants some time ago to advise them on a way forward. The report said that even if there is no shooting allowed, the moor must be managed as a grouse moor. However, the council had no money then to pay for land managers and things have only got worse still as local authority funding is reduced. The answer, which stuck in the throats of many Labour and Liberal councillors was to restart shooting renting the rights out and to require the tenants to carry out the land management while trying to explain the rationale to the local press and public.

The anti-bloodsports brigade have vowed to fight this all the way through putting pressure on councillors and their usual disruption tactics. Unless there is a large step-up in their activities, which I don't think there is, the report in post #1 doesn't signal any change in the situation and in fact shows the antis' weakness. They're mainly outsiders and have no press or serious conservation body support locally as such people understand the issues and realise that one of northern England's most famous landscapes is under serious risk of being permanently ruined - it's one minute to midnight in land and species conservation terms through the council's ill-considered purchase and several years of poor (non existent) land management. The logical thing to do would be to return the land to private ownership by selling it off or handing it over to a grouse shooting partnership at a peppercorn rent, but politically they've painted themselves into a corner on this one.
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Laurie, Wot sort of size is the council owned part of te moor and is it surrounded by other grouse moors? Have they banned snaring too or just tunnel traps?

Unless its well surrounded by other grouse moors it might struggle to keep the density/numbers of grouse needed to make driving vaible.
Just shows u wot a clueelss lot the councilors are, they ban the very traps thathave no doubt seen waders and many other birds breed successfully.


To be fair thou if the moor was bought for public open access, that really does not go hand in and with grouse moor management. Grouse like peace and quiet as much as possible that's why they live in such a harsh environment. Not too mention on shoot days

Surprised red grouse are amber listed (possibly they've mddled up the black grouse, but thought it might be ed listed by now), many shoots in north eng are shooting into 5 figures of brace a season, even a few scottish estates now shooting 3 and 4 thousand brace a season year on year. Never been so many grouse harvested.

Would be an intresting study for GWCT or someone as i doubt public pressure will stop shooting in the future (when lease comes up again) so u could record just how dramtic the decline to upland wasteland is. It won't take long
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
Here's a link to a 2013 council report on the moor issues and strategy. as cn be seen the moor is only one part of a much larger grouse shooting moorland area. There is a question raised as to whether the council would continue to receive Higher Level Stewardship money if the shooting lease were terminated. Since this report was in 2013 and the ruckus over the fact that the council is not terminating the shooting lease at the 5-year break point, it has obvioulsy decided that it is in the moor's interests to carry on. It says in the report that predator control is standard and normal and may have benefits for other bird species, but is 'distasteful', so it appears the council has given in to public and interest group pressure on this one.

The Friends of Ilkley Moor which is mostly anti-shooting is obviously trying to increase its membership substantially and through them raise enough money to pay for the moor upkeep without shooting. We'll see! They've been around for many years and never got beyond the point of being a rather small local single interest group.

http://www.bradford.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/A977A420-BBD5-42DF-B638-F13A44990C80/0/IlkleyMoorSportingRightsDeed.pdf
 

Virbius

Well-Known Member
Irrespective of a lead ban, firearms legislation, antis or animal rights/welfare, game shooting will continue to decline simply because of cost. It costs a lot to put birds over the Guns and there simply aren't enough people who can afford it, very few young people coming into it and as prices keep going up even wealthy Guns won't be getting value for money. I think it is in an unstoppable decline.
 

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