how far out or in

wraith

Well-Known Member
ok lads standard length aol or close to the lands which has given you better results now i keep hearing go with standard sami speck but most forums target and hunting go close to the lands so which is it what is the verdict. what gives better results
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I think it is irrelevant for a stalking rifle. What matters IMHO is that the load is safe and can be chambered in a fouled chamber. If that means that the bullet is back from the lands...and if some makers give a recommended OAL with each particular bullet...then so be it that will do for most. Personally I like a good interface between the case neck and the sides of the bullet and, if possible, the base of parallel sided part of the bullet level with the bottom of the case neck.
 

wraith

Well-Known Member
If you’re an inexperienced reloader, go with SAAMI standard. Always walk before you run.
no bud i have reloaded for over ten years its not what i think works its what the shooters on hear think that im intrested in yes i know getting to close can result in heads getting pulled and presure spikes if touching the lands but do most go with sami speck or go the other way
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I don't think there is a set rule for what works and what doesn't. Work a load up at SAAMI and when it's as good as it can be play with seating depth to see whether it can get any better. I have found as a general rule of thumb that light for calibre/flat base/round nose bullets work close to the lands and my Barnes /ABLR/ELDX and other VLD bullets like to be 100 thou or so off the lands. Another facet of the black art or reloading for accuracy.
 

wraith

Well-Known Member
I don't think there is a set rule for what works and what doesn't. Work a load up at SAAMI and when it's as good as it can be play with seating depth to see whether it can get any better. I have found as a general rule of thumb that light for calibre/flat base/round nose bullets work close to the lands and my Barnes /ABLR/ELDX and other VLD bullets like to be 100 thou or so off the lands. Another facet of the black art or reloading for accuracy.
intresting bud as most eldx and vld bullets like to be very close or jamed in the lands
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
I don’t load tight to the lands. But I do load longer than data OAL. Mag length is the limiting factor in more than one rifle. They all seem to shoot well enough sub half MOA. I do work on minimum of calibre length in the neck. So far it’s worked for me.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
So far I have always ended up back where I started at the bullet manufacturer's recommended COAL. But then I only occasionally achieve sub half MOA...my most successful loads and bullets five-shot-groups' average between 0.609" (9no. groups 110gr TTSX) and 0.846" (17no.110gr V_MAX and 37no. 130gr TTSX). A combination of my reloading, my shooting and a standard weight .308W barrel...

The factory round I use as a control is HPS Target Master which has a Sierra MatchKing 155gr with a COAL of 2.8" which I think is 0.025" over Sierra COAL and they have averaged 0.816" over 32no. groups.

Alan
 
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deeangeo

Well-Known Member
no bud i have reloaded for over ten years its not what i think works its what the shooters on hear think that im intrested in yes i know getting to close can result in heads getting pulled and presure spikes if touching the lands but do most go with sami speck or go the other way
OK, so lots of variable factors come into play if you want to move away from SAAMI spec loads.
Malxwall’s post gives good info for test on VLD type hunting bullets.
Personally my Accubonds are loaded .040” - .060” from the lans. Works extremely well in my rifle depending which propellant/primer combination I’m using.
In most rifles two or even three accuracy nodes may be found, but one thing I never do, is seat bullets tight to the lans.
It’s just not necessary, also, best kept away from for hunting rounds.

Prohunter bullets work well for me with a .050” jump to lans.
160gn Hornady RN work well in my 6.5 rifles at .100” from the lans.

It’s down to you to decide what works best for you and calculate how to arrive at your starting propellant charge.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Alantoo has it right. Load to the length recommended for that bullet and powder charge. It's all I use now. I had my Ruger American 6.5 Creedmoor out yesterday with Nosler 123 grain Custom Competitions. Prone off of a bipod they piled atop each other at 100 yards using Noslers specified OAL. Data providers don't just randomly select a length. It's there for a reason. Save yourself some grief and use it.~Muir
 

A Guy Out West

Well-Known Member
As others have said, start at the manual’s suggested COL and then work towards the lands until you are happy. Or, you can seat to a depth approximately equal to the bullets diameter and adjust from there. If doing this, make sure the OAL is within spec. My first thought is always, does the neck have enough contact to hold the bullet firmly, crimp and all. With .243 and smaller calibers this method may not be doable.
 

Sonicdmb73

Well-Known Member
One thing that you should always bear in mind is that the maximum load. Which is given for the data relates directly to the pressure (if published) produced. Increasing length lowers pressure.
Going less than the listed OAL will increase it. Potentially to dangerous levels.
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
no bud i have reloaded for over ten years its not what i think works its what the shooters on hear think that im intrested in yes i know getting to close can result in heads getting pulled and presure spikes if touching the lands but do most go with sami speck or go the other way
I believe some new reloaders might chase the lands while experimenting and eventually realise that coal is good for hunting. And some of us never learn haha.john
 

Blobby159

Well-Known Member
Interesting read
Yes, I have experimented a great deal with those Berger 'VLD' type bullets and found the later understanding as discussed by Berger bullet smiths on the link does indeed run in the face of the idea propounded here by some of ONLY keeping to the SAAMI dimensions for any particular round, and Bergers are not alone in producing finely constructed, aerodynamically sleek and slippery projectiles with Secant Ogives that ALSO benefit from using the discussed method of finding best accuracy with them.

Personally I have found that MOST of my hand made rounds have benefitted in the accuracy stakes by having the bullet ogive somewhere in the 10 to 30 thousandths of an inch off the lans.

The ONLY rifle rounds to have bucked this definite trend in MY rifles and in MY hand-loading has been with my .22K- Hornet, where the C.O.A.L. has had to be significantly shorter than what I load if I am going for ALL OUT MAXIMUM ACCURACY with these little, efficient rounds when I load the chamber singularly and ignore the magazines.

But when I take that .22K-H out lamping at night (and it is my goto foxing rifle!) I want to use the magazines that came with my beautiful Anschutz rifle for operational ease and speed of repeat follow-up shots if ever needed. That means my rounds for this particular favoured rifle are artificially restricted to something like 100 thou short of the lans so that they will function through the given magazines!!.. Makes the rounds loaded with my preferred bullet - the poly tipped 40gr. Sierra BlitzKing - sit in the cases with the join between ogive and shank actually visibly JUST down inside of the top edge of the case necks. Looks odd but they shoot amazingly!..

So, for me, the idea of ONLY using the SAAMI measurements for COAL is just not applicable when I am searching for ultimate accuracy from my rifles. ... But then I have ALWAYS been a little erm.... Different!.. Ha!

ATB ..... and shoot safely.


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