How long did you study for DSC1?

How long did you study the manual before successfully passing your Level 1 Course


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Tackleberry270

Well-Known Member
#1
How long did you study the manual for before your DSC Level 1 course? (Before successfully passing)

Interested in the answers and whether you think you planned your study time appropriately? .. whether you would have studied differently in hindsight?


.. we are running our next course in November, so I hope the poll and discussion will help those in the run up!
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
#2
didnt study the manual at all I find that sort of document mind blowing !I used a DSC.1 training website sooooo much better for me .:D
I did between 10 mins to half an hour most days for a month and took the test day only along with three pals
hope that helps and we ranged in age from 30-40 something so been left school a while :D
 
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243 Stalker

Well-Known Member
#3
Tackleberry,

It was a good few years back now but from memory I took the literature with me on a two week holiday and every morning (5:30am) I would grab some coffee and read thought it all over and over for two hours until my wife got up. I sat the test the week I returned home and passed, so can't say I would have studied any differently.

ATB 243 Stalker.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#4
I read the manual during the month before.

I took a lot of notes during the course lectures and then studied/revised those in the evenings...using the manual to confirm anything unintelligible in my notes.

I tended to make notes of the things that were new to me rather than just everything that was said.

Alan
 
#5
I think i dropped lucky when i joined the forum,a very kind member sent me his manual ,that i read till my head hurt,i had it at least twelve months,i returned it as soon as i found out i was on the course,i also checked online for bits,ordered the cd,s hygiene/safety i had one with deer recognition on it all of witch i have passed on to another nube,all in all it was stressful but that was just me over thinking it,the course was actually the EASY part,and that included a flyer second shot so borrowed another lads rifle in case mine was out,it wasn,t just one bad round,:rolleyes: I think the most important bit was everyone from start to finish was helpful and put everyone at ease,the paper manual was great because you could recheck everything quickly,the cd,s where brilliant because you could throw them on anytime,good luck with your courses,atb doug,
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
#7
Booked 13th July for a 19 august course got the manuals couple days later read a little. the company has online learning basically a database of the question bank you can do . I ran the online questions repeatedly checking the ones I got wrong each time for the few days before the course wasn't long before scoring 45plus ex 50 every time. Course cleared up the season dates and months for casting rutting velvet scraping and births . And the simple way of deer id. Wasn't worried about the shooting or practical stalk.

So well under the 1 month or a week really

Would I pass the exams now 2 weeks later .....probably.....
in a few months time ???...maybe not
I studied to pass an exam now have time to learn what's relevant to me and know where to look up what I need but can't recall
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#8
I think if you have experience with this sort of multiple choice test and some basic knowledge of the field, you can realistically learn it well enough to pass with about 5 hours worth of concerted effort. Possibly with another 2 hours practicing species recognition.
 
#10
I used Jelen. I went through the questions on their online training system every lunchtime at work for about 6 or so weeks before the test weekend. I also worked through various training manuals (BDS one is the best) on the train in the mornings and evenings.

I had minimal knowledge before.
 
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Ranger22

Well-Known Member
#11
I ticked no study but that's not quite true, I read the paperwork occasionally before the course. Occasionally meaning a couple of times and for less than 10 minutes. Being a stalker I felt pretty confident that I could pass without doing much. I passed but looking back,It would of been easier if I had done more.
 

Rasputin

Well-Known Member
#12
barely none. Looked at pictures,wrote a card with seasons on and that was that. Passed no problems after a 2 day course with BDS Lancashire. Having spent 6 years in HE doing my unergrad than post grad I can honestly say that learning by memory is a total waste of time and its far better to learn by sitting there doing interacting with someone who explains why, when and gives examples and such like. Unless you have a seriously good memory learning mass volume stuff like the book is tiresome and impractical.
 

Oz .17

Active Member
#13
I studied the manual for roughly 2 months, about an hour a night. I had basic deer knowledge before.

Passed no problem!

Thanks
 

N1mr0d

Well-Known Member
#14
I had almost non existent knowledge of deer or their seasons when I started the DSC 1 course and had only read through the gumph a couple of times. Once again a huge thank you to Chris and Jim - they did manage to impart a great deal of knowledge into me. Were I advising someone in a similar situation I would say that much of the course is common sense and a couple of hours study each night should see you through. I would guide folk pre-course in the direction of learning the seasons - not just the dates when deer are in season but when they mate, give birth, rut, shed their antlers, grow their antlers, are in velvet and in tatters. With this knowledge you get clues to deer identification in the images presented and will be less distracted trying to learn this information at the same time as the other useful info in the course.

I drew myself up a month by month chart for each species with the above information. You have to study a fair bit to do this but hardly realise you are.

Question from Chris I well remember - "why have you not practised shooting from the kneeling or sitting position, you knew you would have to do this in the accuracy test?"

atb Geoff
 

Tackleberry270

Well-Known Member
#15
I had almost non existent knowledge of deer or their seasons when I started the DSC 1 course and had only read through the gumph a couple of times. Once again a huge thank you to Chris and Jim - they did manage to impart a great deal of knowledge into me. Were I advising someone in a similar situation I would say that much of the course is common sense and a couple of hours study each night should see you through. I would guide folk pre-course in the direction of learning the seasons - not just the dates when deer are in season but when they mate, give birth, rut, shed their antlers, grow their antlers, are in velvet and in tatters. With this knowledge you get clues to deer identification in the images presented and will be less distracted trying to learn this information at the same time as the other useful info in the course.

I drew myself up a month by month chart for each species with the above information. You have to study a fair bit to do this but hardly realise you are.

Question from Chris I well remember - "why have you not practised shooting from the kneeling or sitting position, you knew you would have to do this in the accuracy test?"

atb Geoff
Good points Geoff.
 

Fishpond

Well-Known Member
#16
I borrowed a manual from someone who'd done the course before and read this in the month upto my dsc1 but then discovered BDS ultimate deer data on line quizes a couple of weeks before which I commend to anyone - definitely good to read manual before that way you are able to relax and enjoy the course just focusing on the bits you don't know or need clarification on.

Richard
 

Tackleberry270

Well-Known Member
#17
Thanks all for your input. I'm glad the general consensus is that pre study is necessary as I think the right approach to the course itself is that it is for confirming and discussing what you have studied in the run up and tying up the loose ends before the assessments.
 
#18
I spent the days prior to staying over at Donnington deer, studying in small quarter hour sessions when things were quiet work wise, The only drawback for me were the digs I used, right under the cargo aircraft routes from East mids:rolleyes:, I really enjoyed my time with Dave Stretton & did my dry stalk with his son, catering from Mrs Stretton was superb, many knuckles stabbed with fork tines when the sausages pile got a bit low!!:).
 

slider

Well-Known Member
#19
As long as you need to!

I bought the DSC Deer Stalking manual, just out of interest, that lead me to do my DSC 1, just out of interest. The rest is history.............
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
#20
I'd already been stalking sixteen years before doing DSC1, then DSC2.. 14 years ago. It's a good thing to do, but I still have to look up close seasons for England/Wales :-|
 

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