How long to wait in a high seat?

Sash

Well-Known Member
#1
I have started to stalk in a large wood with a good number of quite well-positioned high seats. So far, all my success has come from just one of them, which overlooks a small meadow. I typically spend a couple of hours there and, more often than not, am rewarded with a deer.

What I would be interested to understand from other members is, given a choice of seats but if you had seen no deer, how long you would typically wait in a high seat before climbing down and moving on to another one? Is there a risk that, however carefully I stalk between seats, I will spook more deer than if I waited in the same seat for twice the time? I am torn between always starting at the same "lucky" seat (and then never getting beyond it) and thinking I could cover more ground in a morning's stalk.

Thanks for any advice
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#2
I have started to stalk in a large wood with a good number of quite well-positioned high seats. So far, all my success has come from just one of them, which overlooks a small meadow. I typically spend a couple of hours there and, more often than not, am rewarded with a deer.

What I would be interested to understand from other members is, given a choice of seats but if you had seen no deer, how long you would typically wait in a high seat before climbing down and moving on to another one? Is there a risk that, however carefully I stalk between seats, I will spook more deer than if I waited in the same seat for twice the time? I am torn between always starting at the same "lucky" seat (and then never getting beyond it) and thinking I could cover more ground in a morning's stalk.

Thanks for any advice
What a dilemma!

If the other high seats are not productive why do you refer to them as well-positioned?

If you are bored with being successful from your productive high seat then you may as well move...if you are desperate to go home with a deer then logic would sort of indicate that you continue to use the productive seat until such time as it fails to produce...

Alan
 

Tom D

Well-Known Member
#3
Wind direction, weather, time of year time of day, will all affect where the deer are at any given time, it's not as simple as just having the seat in the right place.. If your meadow is being battered by a gale there maybe more chance of seeing deer in a more sheltered spot..
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
#4
When I had access to some really good high seats, snug enough to doze in and sheltered from the wind and rain, I took enough sandwiches to last me from Monday to Friday unless a Deer showed itself ;)
 
#5
Stay where you are. Have a nap, check email, count clouds... No matter. You are in the right place so keep still and be patient. The best seat is the one that is the one that they don't know about, so enjoy being out there. Seeing one is a privilege, getting it in the cross hairs is a bonus, and putting something in the freezer is the ultimate!
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
#6
quote.......I typically spend a couple of hours there and, more often than not, am rewarded with a deer.

wow thats good........ keep going there.


two hours at dawn and two hours at dusk is about right, but longer if its comfortable.
you often get a "fail me never seat" the more its used the more deer get shot from it
and so the more popular it becomes. The answer is to get someone in each of the seats at the same time
and see what they see. I sometimes put a camera up in one seat then sit in another
Later you can run the film back and see what you might have seen.

If you have a series of seats you can sit in one at dawn for an hour, stalk to the next, have half hour sit down,
then stalk to the next etc.

Ive put a trail cam out and at one seat you would have to go about a dozen times in order to have a chance to see a deer

 

VSS

Well-Known Member
#8
I've yet to shoot a deer from a seat (or from anywhere else come to that - I'm a bit of a slow starter at this game :oops:), but I love sitting up in a highseat. I certainly wouldn't put a time limit on it. It's just amazing for watching wildlife, even if there's no deer about. In fact, I'm tempted to put one up on my own farm (where deer don't exist) purely for the pleasure of sitting up there at daybreak, and maybe bag the odd fox or bunny.
 

Uncle Norm

Well-Known Member
#9
quote
Ive put a trail cam out and at one seat you would have to go about a dozen times in order to have a chance to see a deer

Good idea Bob. We are just in the process of doing the same after four consecutive blanks from one of our seats.
Finding which seats just don't work, without using lots of blank stalker-visits is a real bonus, particularly when one needs to get results.
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
#10
everyone has their favorite seat even out of 100 + on the estate I make it my mission to try and see and cull deer from the ones I've not done so from so far .you kind of have a feeling if a seat will produce or not and at what times of day or even season it will come up trumps .fallow in particular wise up to seats that they get a hammering from .many times I've had esp older does look straight up at a seat before they step out too far !
Norma
 

kimh

Well-Known Member
#11
once in the seat the stalk stops, you are preying
both are different but all are learning
one you go to it the other it comes to you
high seats are good, but simply a tool of the stalker as he/she has placed them, if you didn't place them you don't appreciate the reason of their position, they maybe history of a previous quantity of animal
get back on the ground...
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
#12
I have never really used high seats before, but with friends in Germany and using high seats. We are into them at 7.30 and out at 7.30 in the morning. See nothing much for the first hour and then things move. You have to be very quiet. We are not talking wobbling on the end of a ladder, but a full box. When too dark to see much, pull on your sleeping bag and then sleep for a few hours till first light. Just getting ready to go out and we will on fresh cut stubble a so even if full dark - no moon, should hopefully have enough to shoot a pig.

I have downloaded some good radio plays onto my iPhone to while away the hours. Once animals start appearing time flies. I had two hours yesterday morning with a doe and two fawns just playing about - magic.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#13
I'm happier actually stalking than I am in a high seat, to be honest. Mind you, that stab of adrenaline when something steps out of cover after a couple of hours of waiting is always a pot of gold by itself
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
#15
I've got the stage of life where walking/stalking isn't an option any longer, so it has to be a high seat or doe box sit.
it's pleasant enough wishful thinking looking across the trees, hills, moor & scree I used to walk over the past 30 years, while also quietly watching the wildlife.

Then, when a stag/hind, buck/doe appears, the adrenalin hit is just the same as when I stalked.
It's still magic!
 
#16
I use a portable, just look for the used tracks etc, pop it up at night (2 minutes), go back before dawn and sit it out for as long as it takes. Shoot one and take seat down, move to new position, go that night. A little bit of woodcraft works well.
 
#17
I have a new portable high seat and have recce'd a number of locations. My plan is to set it up in the morning and return in the late afternoon; sunset is about 2000 hrs up here in the north. How long before sunset is it sensible to be quietly in place? Any thoughts?
 

Chasey

Well-Known Member
#19
Put trail cams up by the high seats and see whats mooving arround them and when


Walk and stalk is fantastic but in my part of the UK its very hartd to get a permission and 10X harder trying to find one you can walk and stalk.


I am simply gobsmacked how bad some high seat design is. I swear most were designed by Vlad the Impailer after he became a Huinting Anti :D

In a good high seat I can sit gfour hours watching the wildlife world go by but in a bad one the time v pain ratio dictates the period.

ATB

CHasey
 

FISMA

Well-Known Member
#20
What I would be interested to understand from other members is...
A lot depends on what kind of deer you shoot. However, no matter what type of deer, pick the chair that favours the wind.

Some deer are dusk/dawn creatures, like the white-tails I have taken. Others, like fallow, could show up at any time. Most fallow I have taken have been at 10:00am.
 

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