How many don't trim their brass cases when reloading ?

Brithunter

Well-Known Member
We seem to be seeing a fair few questions on reloading that the answer seems to be trim the case to the proper length.

This has got me wondering how many don't trim or don't even know that cases need to be trimmed.

One need not spend a small fortune of a trimmer as there are lots of ways to achieve the proper end result. From trim dies or the Lee Trim studs to the case prep stations.

​However it's done it's something that must be kept in check.
 

mereside

Well-Known Member
i do with the simple lee hand held trimmers but i have just got a redding heavy duty trimmer i am in the process of refurbing i got it so i could use it not only trimming cases but for other uses also,atb wayne
 

DanTheMan

Well-Known Member
Pistol cases I never trim (don't even clean them), rifle cases I always clean and trim with the lee trimmer.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
I would put trimming down as one of the essential stages of reloading! If the case is longer than the maximum case length, the neck of the case will eventually migrate into the throat portion of the chamber effectively “pinching” the bullet or severely increasing neck tension, resulting in
high, or even dangerous pressures!
I just use a cheap Lee trimmer which slots nicely into an electric drill.
MS
 

6.5rem700

Well-Known Member
i use the lee zip trim ,new brass in my 22,250 and 6.5x55 usually doesn't need doing till the 3rd firing
and then every firing after that
 

M275

Well-Known Member
Yes, guilty.. I used to shoot pistol and no cases ever grew beyond the trim-to length. When I started rifle reloading it was some time before I "got round" to checking case lengths, currently I sort them by length and put aside any that are over-length in anticipation of buying a trimmer. It seems to take 3 or 4 firings before they go beyond maximum length.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I trim every loading, essential part of the process as far as i'm concerned.

I'm in 100% agreement. For accuracy shooting I will find the shortest case in the batch of brass with a vernier and set my Forster trimmer to cut all to that length.~Muir
 

Ranger22

Well-Known Member
I check the length every time I'm loading, i find some makes of brass need trimming every couple of firings others less often

Al
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
+1 every time I clean and prep I do this most time nothing is removed also prep each neck as well before primer pocket cutting and cleaning my choice just the way I do things:old:
 

Devon County Shooter

Well-Known Member
Its all about consistence here. If you have cases that have more surface area holding the bullet in place, you will get different pressures overall. I do own a .308 Win chamber gauge and the results are interesting but in my own mind trimming the cases back all the same is a variable that we can control.
 

Frog

Well-Known Member
Couldn't agree more. Trimming case length is the easiest thing to do in getting consistent rounds.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
i have a few Lee trimmers some that are modified

one of the .222 ones I ground the tip down so that it trims to my length not just the max spec length.
bit of trial and error but it removes brass on every case now. some barely a shaving others it takes more
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
Its all about consistence here. If you have cases that have more surface area holding the bullet in place, you will get different pressures overall. I do own a .308 Win chamber gauge and the results are interesting but in my own mind trimming the cases back all the same is a variable that we can control.

Ditto neck tension and why I quarantine *Hornet cases where bullets fail to seat with the desired resistance. (*Note: I mention this wee case simply as all variances are much more noticable than say in a case of 243 proportions/capacity.

K
 
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Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
trimming is a fast job, no need to skip it but if you miss a case it's not the end of the world, after 3 or 4 firings though it's a different story.
 

Danny Treacy

Well-Known Member
Is a case trimmer part of the lee kit? Just wondering as I am trying to weigh up if its best to buy the lee kit or just buy all bits needed by different manufacturers?

​cheers.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
don't know if it is part of the kit you are considering but in my mind it is certainly the easiest, cheapest and simplest design
 

fizzbangwhallop

Well-Known Member
don't know if it is part of the kit you are considering but in my mind it is certainly the easiest, cheapest and simplest design

Agree with that. Even got a .223 case length gauge turned down for my .20Prac which is just a necked down .223 anyway. Shame I couldn't do the same for the .17Rem.. the Lee cutter is just too damn big.


 

bobjs

Well-Known Member
i trim all my cases after 2 reloads. after full sizing the brass.

i read a thread on a US sniper forum that the chap that posted his reply recons that the case wall can become thin/thiner if the cases are over trimmed ??.

thus leading to case head seperation from the body.(his words not mine)

i have only ever seen this once and the case in question was a 223 case and had been reloaded way beyond 30 times to prove a point.

bob.
 
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