Humane dispatch

Utectok

Well-Known Member
So the other day driving to my permission I spotted buck clearly a rtc case badly injured but walking. He was in the adjacent field to my wood but would be an easy shot sub 100m. My question is he is not on the roadside and clearly in Pain and will certainly die shortly if I saw him in the same spot would it be legal to shoot him? Safe backstop ect....
 

Sampo

Well-Known Member
If you have the contact details of the person/ owner of the land who has shooting rights, a quick phone call or knocking on the door to explain the situation could result in getting the permission. Else irrespective of the situation, it could be classified as an armed trespass in my view. If its on the roadside, I believe it would be even more complicated as you need to find out who owns that part of the road and getting necessary approvals. Easier to call someone like RSPCA and let them deal with the issue to avoid any complications.
 

Utectok

Well-Known Member
I’ve killed a few deer on the roadside by requests of friends and neighbours (knives usually) and a police friend of mine said it was ok? Perhaps not?
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
No right minded individual is going to try and prosecute anyone for dispatching an animal in distress.

It is never going to be "in the public interest" to prosecute anything for this " offence".

As a person in a position to relieve suffering to any animal, then do as your conscious demands.

You all know what is right.
 
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Sampo

Well-Known Member
No right minded individual is going to try and prosecute anyone for dispatching an animal in distress.

It is never going to be "in the public interest" to prosecute anything for this " offence".

As a person in a position to relieve suffering to any animal, then do as your conscious demands.

You all know what is right.
Unfortunately we have a lot of left minded individuals with smartphones who are all about tree hugging and loving all animals. Unfortunately in certain areas, they make up a lot of the public and does influence the decisions. In my view, doing the right thing may not always be interpreted the same way within the law. Always good to be cautious.
 

Firefly

Well-Known Member
No right minded individual is going to try and prosecute anyone for dispatching an animal in distress.

It is never going to be "in the public interest" to prosecute anything for this " offence".

As a person in a position to relieve suffering to any animal, then do as your conscious demands.

You all know what is right.
Yes, absolutely and I wholeheartedly agree that animals should not be allowed to suffer. The problem lies in the fact that there are a lot of people who don’t understand what is going on when we dispatch deer at the roadside. I speak from experience. There is also the question of insurance. BASC and BDS insurance only cover you for humane dispatch at the roadside if you are a member of a HAD scheme and have been called by the police. God forbid if anything were to go wrong. Where would you stand?
 

Rake Aboot

Well-Known Member
I'd have shot it.

I've chased a few away from RTA's with the reason that the longer they stand about telling me they want to save the deer, the longer it's in utter agony.

To be honest it's one thing I just get out and do regardless. I used a hammer on one before. It was feking quick as well. Sod the consequences when the poor beast is suffering, I'll happily defend myself over my choices.
 

Tf223

Well-Known Member
No right minded individual is going to try and prosecute anyone for dispatching an animal in distress.

It is never going to be "in the public interest" to prosecute anything for this " offence".

As a person in a position to relieve suffering to any animal, then do as your conscious demands.

You all know what is right.
Spot on.
I’m all for being aware of the legal provisions, but also for pragmatism. Public interest will play a massive part in any action or thoughts of such - I’d happily make my argument after the fact
 
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Utectok

Well-Known Member
I'd have shot it.

I've chased a few away from RTA's with the reason that the longer they stand about telling me they want to save the deer, the longer it's in utter agony.

To be honest it's one thing I just get out and do regardless. I used a hammer on one before. It was feking quick as well. Sod the consequences when the poor beast is suffering, I'll happily defend myself over my choices.
Tbh I was going to as it was 5am no one about but by the time I got my rifle out and loaded he had spotted me and limped into a thicket and I wasn’t going to charge around the countryside after him. Mind you I suspect he’s dead now.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I'd have shot it.

I've chased a few away from RTA's with the reason that the longer they stand about telling me they want to save the deer, the longer it's in utter agony.

To be honest it's one thing I just get out and do regardless. I used a hammer on one before. It was feking quick as well. Sod the consequences when the poor beast is suffering, I'll happily defend myself over my choices.
We don't often agree, but on this I'm 100% with you
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
So the other day driving to my permission I spotted buck clearly a rtc case badly injured but walking. He was in the adjacent field to my wood but would be an easy shot sub 100m. My question is he is not on the roadside and clearly in Pain and will certainly die shortly if I saw him in the same spot would it be legal to shoot him? Safe backstop ect....
A difficult situation, and you can only do what you feel is right in the circumstances.

However, you now have a good reason/reminder to contact the landowners adjacent to your permission and set up a mutual agreement to allow access for a follow up or similar humane dispatch scenarios.

I confess I have only done that on some of the adjacent land on some of my permissions but not all of them...but I have also acquired contact details for some of the landowners even though I haven't made arrangements with them yet.

PPPPPP?

Alan
 
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spandit

Well-Known Member
Would you have shot it if you didn't have a deer legal calibre, say if you were out foxing with a .223 or rabbiting with a rimfire?
I'd say I'd have shot it with the .223 - the chances of anyone actually finding out and making an issue of it is very remote and the fact it was obviously injured is good enough excuse for me. As has been mentioned, the interest in taking this to prosecution is minimal. Close up with a rimfire, even sub 50yds, I'd be unconfident I wouldn't cause more suffering.
 
Would you have shot it if you didn't have a deer legal calibre, say if you were out foxing with a .223 or rabbiting with a rimfire?
I'd say I'd have shot it with the .223 - the chances of anyone actually finding out and making an issue of it is very remote and the fact it was obviously injured is good enough excuse for me. As has been mentioned, the interest in taking this to prosecution is minimal. Close up with a rimfire, even sub 50yds, I'd be unconfident I wouldn't cause more suffering.
I rarely use a deer legal cal when called to an RTA is normally a pistol, shotgun or a knife
 

spandit

Well-Known Member
RTA slightly different inasmuch you are on a police list and potentially trained. I was thinking about the scenario where you come across a wounded animal in the field. Bottletopbill put it best
 
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