Hunting Traditions

MARCBO

Account Suspended
How far back do hunting traditions go in the UK? In 1930's Germany, Hermann Goering established the Prussian traditions as the standard for all of Germany and those have pretty much remained the same since then. The traditions cover clothing, ceremonies, and even the language (Jagdsprache). Is it the same in the Uk?

SS
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I suppose that depends on how you define "hunting"?

For example, hunting foxes with hounds, horses and all the palaver that goes with the "traditional" hunt, is relatively recent, as is driven game shooting.
 

exmarksman9870

Well-Known Member
When i shoot bucks i always show respect... put the last feast in its mouth and thank it for the privilege to shoot...never bother with the does etc. Also blooding when a shooter takes his first deer .as i did with my son at christmas when he got his first deer..
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
When i shoot bucks i always show respect... put the last feast in its mouth and thank it for the privilege to shoot...never bother with the does etc. Also blooding when a shooter takes his first deer .as i did with my son at christmas when he got his first deer..
The last feed is more a European tradition than a UK one.
 

Chris Rob

Well-Known Member
The earliest known attempt to hunt a fox with hounds was in Norfolk in 1534 where farmers began chasing foxes down with their dogs for the purpose of pest control. The first use of packs specifically trained to hunt foxes was in the late 1600s, with the oldest fox hunt probably being the Bilsdale in Yorkshire.

It was in the third quarter of the 19th century that driven (battue) pheasant established itself. The traditional British method was to walk-up over setters or pointers or to flush birds from cover with spaniels. The battue was first popularised by the Prince Consort Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in the 1840s and taken up by his wayward but trend-setting son, Edward Albert (notably at Sandringham). The early form had been to walk in line with the beaters through a prepared wood, which was typically netted to the sides and back. Later post 1860 guns and beaters were split into different parties along modern lines.

Since Norman times deer have been hunted for both sport and as a source of meat. Historically all deer and other game belonged to the king and the right to kill or take a deer remained the exclusive preserve the king through 'Forest Law'. Packs of hounds known as stag hounds and buck hounds were used to pursue and take down deer. Flusing deer to areas where they could be killed using bows and crossbows was also commonly practiced, particularly during Elizabethan times.

There you go a potted history :thumb:

Chris
 

chiron

Well-Known Member
Driven shooting- some times a drink before first drive ,drink(often sloe gin or similar) after 2 or three drives and at end of day a tip to the keeper -if you are old school very discreetly in palm of hand when thanking him/her for their efforts - even if you haven't shot anything all day. Always cash and never ask him if he will take a cheque as some on did at a shoot I was on! Then as far as I am concerned a cup of tea. I like to look at the bag and all ways take a brace of birds - I think its rude not to. These are simple traditions that have been part of driven shooting for years and years.
When I am stalking I always say a quiet thank you to the hunting gods and take a moment to admire the beast before the Gralloch. Then if I am a guest or paying for stalking get in and help drag again I think its only polite and honours what you have shot.. Then a cup of tea. Nothing tastes finer than a flask of tea after a hard stalk. In the evening write up the records and stalking diary ideally with a glass of something nice.
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
A German forestry official (Herr Walter Frevert who also is known for developing a hunting knife called the Waidblatt made by Puma) had been working on re writing the national jagdgesetz (hunting laws) since the 1920s The nazis rose to power in 1933 and goering being a hunting fanatic was designated to be the signer of the document into law but the rules pre date the nazis and are pretty commonsense stuff so dont blame hitler for them.
Martin
 
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Jagare

Well-Known Member
Not talking about Scottish stalking traditions, but UK stalking traditions are still in the making. When i started stalking ,hunting ,killing deer call it what you will ;) deer were still look at as vermin. So if any, our traditions are picked from the various European tradition.
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
It would depend wot u call hunting? Generally in uk hunting means with fox hounds/beagles and u then have stalking for deer or various types of shooting for birds.

I would of said ur hunting with hound traditions will be the oldest in UK (althou a lot of the original hound/dog sports will be banned now), modern driven game shooting really only started with the invention of breechloading guns .
Stalking (lowland esp roe and non native sp)will probably be the most recent branch (apart from ur classic old fashioned hill red stag stalking for the landed gentry) its only really the past 40ishyears its really taken off with the change in laws etc, round my area most roe deer were effectively treated as pests and shot with shotguns on vermin days.

Must admit i'm not really aware of that many traditions, with either stalking or shooting other than showing some respect for the quarry

Jagare's pretty much said wot i was meaning
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
How far back do hunting traditions go in the UK? In 1930's Germany, Hermann Goering established the Prussian traditions as the standard for all of Germany and those have pretty much remained the same since then. The traditions cover clothing, ceremonies, and even the language (Jagdsprache). Is it the same in the Uk?

SS
Yes, exactly the same.

Hermann Goering had a tremendous following among the shooting community in the 1930s and is still widly, if secretively, revered.

The admiration of the British Jaegervolk (as we call ourselves) for the German traditions is exemplified by the acres of Loden worn, the ceaseless blowing of tunes of horns to signal just about anything and the use of an arcane vocabulary to name everything that is not better described by bugle-fanfares. Oh - and the hair of wildboars mounted in silver and fixed to our green felt hats.

The epitome of this reverence for Third Empire Teutonic sporting practices was the abolition of the hunting of foxen with the foxdogs by Mr Blair's government - a late, but nevertheless deeply symbolic tribute to Hermann Goering's similar abolition of the practice in Germany in 1936
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
... the ceaseless blowing of tunes of horns to signal just about anything and the use of an arcane vocabulary to name everything that is not better described by bugle-fanfares. Oh - and the hair of wildboars mounted in silver and fixed to our green felt hats.
Well, I have a Taschenjagdhorn (pocket hunting horn) and a Fürst-Pless-Horn. Not just that, but I have a CD of all the bugle calls as well.

To me it's no different to the Queen's Guard - somewhat anachronistic but enjoyable nonetheless.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
Yes, exactly the same.

Hermann Goering had a tremendous following among the shooting community in the 1930s and is still widly, if secretively, revered.

The admiration of the British Jaegervolk (as we call ourselves) for the German traditions is exemplified by the acres of Loden worn, the ceaseless blowing of tunes of horns to signal just about anything and the use of an arcane vocabulary to name everything that is not better described by bugle-fanfares. Oh - and the hair of wildboars mounted in silver and fixed to our green felt hats.

The epitome of this reverence for Third Empire Teutonic sporting practices was the abolition of the hunting of foxen with the foxdogs by Mr Blair's government - a late, but nevertheless deeply symbolic tribute to Hermann Goering's similar abolition of the practice in Germany in 1936
^^^^
That made me smile . Myself i like the traditions we have here. Off with the hat when greeting people at a shoot and when the instructions are given about the days shooting. I like the game parade at the end of the day with a short speach of thanks by the guns and shoot host. The guns always shake the hands of the beaters and the picking up team or dog handlers at the end of the day. I can't stand the ignorant people who can't wait to climb into their cars and leave as soon as they last drive is over that i have seen so many times on shoots in the UK.
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
Well, I have a Taschenjagdhorn (pocket hunting horn)...
From time to time I consider buying one of these. I have a copy of a book with scores for the various Jagdsignale, and I am half-German as well as having had horn lessons for a while when a boy.

However, if i were to blow a few repetitions of Fuchs tot at 2am after a successful night's lamping, having laid out the slain in the yard, my formerly-genial hosts might well start to wonder why I bother with a mod on the rifle.

I am inclined to the view that the constuct of German Jaeger-stuff seems a little absurd. I think we're much better off without it.

The excellent standards of behaviour that Jagare describes belong in my opinion in the realm of good manners, rather than of shooting/stalking (or as they say in the US, hunting) traditions.
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
From time to time I consider buying one of these. I have a copy of a book with scores for the various Jagdsignale, and I am half-German as well as having had horn lessons for a while when a boy.
Take the plunge and buy one.

I played trumpet, bugle, euphonium and Eb horn at school, yet getting a tune out of the taschenjagdhorn is still proving a challenge!
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
Was it his decision that the pilots survival weapon was a drilling then?
You have quoted a comment which I made (perhaps with a measure of irony?) in relation to the UK, and the pilots of the RAF were not equipped as far as I'm aware with three-barrelled survival rifles; though if Goering had been in a position to decide how they should be equipped they might well have been.

However, it seems very likely that Goering's love of 'hunting' (though not, ironically, what we in the UK would call hunting - which as I say, he banned) had something to do with the adoption of the M30 triplet by the Luftwaffe.
 
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finnbear270

Well-Known Member
I found the traditional German Boar drives much more enjoyable, due to the post hunt paying of respect to the quarry, & the presentation of spruce sprigs to those who had been lucky enough to get a successful shot away.View attachment 52859 Even this unfortunate fox was saluted in proper fashion & placed on the carpet of branches.
 

pitiliedon

Well-Known Member
As posted already depends what we are calling traditions. I think much of what the traditional highland stalker or shooter does today will be heavily influenced by the Victorians Who no doubt took from what had gone before. Certainly traditions with firearms which are a relatively new weapon to deer stalking probably stems from them. Pre -dating that , I suspect a cast spear and bows and arrows together with a couple of brace of long dogs to course red deer or turn them at bay would have it's own accepted traditions which itself probably superceded the Tainchell , The huge deer drives where the royalty and warrior elite would strip to the waist and use sword , spear and axe or dirk to dispatch deer and wolves driven into some narrow place.

I think much of the European traditions show more respect to the quarry and the display of results of the hunting day definitely add to the spectacle , certainly more so than throwing carcasses in the belly of the Argo to slosh around.
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
I think much of the European traditions show more respect to the quarry and the display of results of the hunting day definitely add to the spectacle
Spectacle, for sure. And a spectacle remarkably unbritish, at that - and so best experienced abroad.
As to the rest, you either have some regard for your quarry as a piece of brute creation whose life you've just snuffed out, or you don't. The end result is the same, and my feeling is that no amount of anthropomorphic and quasi-religious falderol should make up for its absence if you don't have it, nor make you feel any better about it if you do.



certainly more so than throwing carcasses in the belly of the Argo to slosh around.
...and then sitting on them on the ride back off the hill.

Luckily, all my stalking is done on estates where the Noble Slain are carried off the hill shoulder-high on litters bedecked with traditional Sitka spruce and Lodgepole pine by teams of kilted ghillies, six for a hind and four for a calf.
And I have always wear a tie when stalking.
But only one of the above is true.
 

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