Hydrostatic shock, fact or myth?

Tamus

Well-Known Member
Is the notion that a high velocity projectile strike (e.g. a bullet strike) will somehow produce a hydraulic shock wave that stuns the Central Nervous System (CNS) and ultimately aids in rapidly killing a creature so struck, fact or myth?
 
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widows son

Well-Known Member
If you take you question along to the best practice day and go to the lecture by Jim govan you'll have all the answers you ever required on this subject ,he is the man in the know on this .
 

Thar

Well-Known Member
Tammus

This has been done to death before, look at some of the old posts.

ATB
Tahr
 

Tamus

Well-Known Member
If you take you question along to the best practice day and go to the lecture by Jim govan you'll have all the answers you ever required on this subject ,he is the man in the know on this .
Sorry, WS, I can't make it to the best practice day, this time around.
 

Grandhubert

Well-Known Member
A single cellular organism of appropriate size would suffer from the phenomenon you describe.

Forget it for multicellular organisms of any reasonable size with small arms.

I do however hear that Leopards and Lions are very susceptible to velocity, regularly, but am skeptical unless at the very least bone is hit.
 

Tamus

Well-Known Member
Tammus

This has been done to death before, look at some of the old posts.

ATB
Tahr
Sorry Thar. The thing is, I'm relatively new to this website, as are many others. Before posting a new thread I do usually at least try and check and I didn't find anything devoted to this topic. There is a blizzard of back-threads to search through and doubtless it was lost in there. Maybe you old hands are either going to have to get use to us newbies asking questions that have already been answered or else there's a problem that it seems will be hard to resolve.
 

Tamus

Well-Known Member
For what it's worth, the notion makes absolutely no sense to me. However, there are clearly those who believe otherwise.
 

jingzy

Well-Known Member
A single cellular organism of appropriate size would suffer from the phenomenon you describe.

Forget it for multicellular organisms of any reasonable size with small arms.

I do however hear that Leopards and Lions are very susceptible to velocity, regularly, but am skeptical unless at the very least bone is hit.
I have done some reading on the subject and contributed to the last very lengthy discussion on here the last time. I believe that it exists and the above quote I could not disagree with more. :eek:
 

sweep 6.5x55

Well-Known Member
If you take you question along to the best practice day and go to the lecture by Jim govan you'll have all the answers you ever required on this subject ,he is the man in the know on this .
+1 To that


Jim is the man its is all about temperary and permanant wound cavities
 

Tamus

Well-Known Member
Thanks Sweepee. Last time around the topic was about energy transfer and the debate seems to have polarised around...

A) Making holes in the right bits is fatal

and...

B) There is a hydraulic displacement/shock that is also important.

The debate was not resolved conclusively.

I would say that the incompressibilty of water thing is an utter red herring. Animals have voids and tissue structures that are capable of absorbing quite a bit of compression. Bullets deform in co-incidence with the damage they do to tissue. Mr. Newtons third law seems to apply.
 

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