I think she's got it

Heimdall

Well-Known Member
Some time ago I decided to get a dog to help me with deer recovery. After quite a lot of research and questions I found just what I wanted. Bella is a beautiful chocolate cross with a Gwp/ Hsv, I had pretty much the pick of the litter and decided on Bella as she was the largest of the bitches and the most inquisitive . Well lots of training and effort later bella is now 12 months old we were out on a forest in Scotland on a very foggy morning tbh I was going to call it a day when Bella pointed a nice big red hind. I would never have seen it but she did, anyway I shot it and it dropped on the spot. Bella is now 18 months old and regularly pointing deer for me by either scent or sight. On our last trip out she found me a nice young staggie feeding along a drainage ditch, we stalked in closer about 130 yards got on the sticks and fired , it was a good shot but the staggie took off crashing through undergrowth. I new what direction it had gone so sent Bella on to find it, she ran straight to the shot site did about 3 circles scenting the air and pointing in the right direction. I walked to her clipped on the long lead and sent her on again, after only 3 or 4 minutes we had covered some 200 yards there it was laying in some deep brackens. I am so pleased with her and it makes stalking that bit easier as she finds the deer I don't see. Having a dog to be your stalking partner is great I really think she had got what it takes now let's see how she works on birds can't wait
 

bullet chucker

Well-Known Member
Great write up, well done on the choice of pup and well done on the training program so far,I can see she is a companion as well as a partner to you long may it continue.

BC.
 

th32

Well-Known Member
If she is like that now, sure she'll get better in the future. I have one question for you, does she goes leaded or free while stalking?
 

Heimdall

Well-Known Member
To be honest she does both it depends on the terrain. When open land and clearfell she is on the lead but in Forest she's off the lead. The reason for this is simple she always likes to have me in clear sight and on open land she could walk much further ahead so I keep her closer
 

THE AD

Active Member
How hard or easy is it to train the dog.
We were having a good talk yesterday about getting a dog to do just this.
 

Heimdall

Well-Known Member
I have had dogs all my life but only as a companion. this is the first dog i have trained for hunting / tracking. All i have done differently with bella is used tracking and pointing as part of play from the start. i got her pointing at first using feathers and fishing line to mimic movement and got her to react and gave lots of praise when she got it right. as for tracking i started with my home made venison sausages leaving long scent trails for her to follow with the reward at the end, later using watered down deer blood or a fresh skin. I think if you pick the right dog and reinforce the traits you want its quite easy, having said that my dog still plays up sometimes but she is still young and got more to learn as do I
IMG_20180715_070857.jpg
 

THE AD

Active Member
Thanks for the info,we have labs for pigeon and pheasant also a bit of beating but they are 6&7 yr old.
Probably get a pup and start it off young.
Thanks again.
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
THE AD....I also have labs, primarily trained for bird work (two of them seven yrs old also!) and one of them is a very effective deer dog. As long as they're steady, you might be surprised how good they become. It took three or four outings to get her settled, but now she's rock solid at heel and is controlled just with hand gestures. Our permission has a LOT of dense young trees on it, so if a beast runs into heavy cover, the dog is absolutely invaluable. She also 'points' the deer - but it took longer for me to realise what she was doing than it did for the dog! Give them a try...
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I would be cautious about sending her forward off the lead towards a shot deer. May encourage her to run in a bit. I would take her in on the lead and encourage her to find the blood and then follow up the deer. As always, give it plenty of time for the deer to die peacefully. We had a staggie take a bullet through the boiler room and go down. We left it a few minutes and as we got up it ran off - I don't suspect it would have got far, but a snap shot put it down and out.

I would n't have wanted my young lab cross to be tackling a wounded stag, and certainly not early in its career. Antlers can cause big damage very easily.
 

Siggy

Well-Known Member
I have had dogs all my life but only as a companion. this is the first dog i have trained for hunting / tracking. All i have done differently with bella is used tracking and pointing as part of play from the start. i got her pointing at first using feathers and fishing line to mimic movement and got her to react and gave lots of praise when she got it right. as for tracking i started with my home made venison sausages leaving long scent trails for her to follow with the reward at the end, later using watered down deer blood or a fresh skin. I think if you pick the right dog and reinforce the traits you want its quite easy, having said that my dog still plays up sometimes but she is still young and got more to learn as do I
View attachment 100793
Cracking looking dog! Thanks for the write up, it’s always good to hear how other other people train us their dogs.
 

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