Inexpensive rifle - Thompson Center Compass

Southern

Well-Known Member
Is the TC Compass available in the UK?
Here, it has an MSRP of $399.00 and a common retail of $349.00 or $379.00 special with a Nikon 3-9x40mm scope.
It comes with 5R rifling, Winchester Model 70 style safety, and threaded barrels in 22 inches.
Guarantee is 1 MOA with factory ammunition.
Lots of chamberings, from .204 and .223 to .30-06.
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
They sound like a great budget rifle.
They are on sale here but with with the high dollar,shipping, duty, taxes, profit margins
they cost double what you can buy them for in the States.

Its a pretty general trend for shooting hunting items to cost up to double.

We could do with a new trade deal and an outlet giving us the same good
value you get over there.
 

Greener Jim

Well-Known Member
The main issue is ITAR, costs a fair chunk to get the rifles out of the States and the importer either has to import lots to make it cheaper per unit and take a risk they won't sell, or import what he knows he can sell and pass the increased cost on.
One of the reasons that Howa and Bergara are doing very nicely here.
 

Roro

Well-Known Member
I have often looked at the price of us made rifles and pistols, but by the time they get here the european prices bear no resemblance to the American prices. Also the likes of CZ, Bergara some of the Italian makers wind up far cheaper and fill the lower end of the market.
 

iain b

Well-Known Member
Is the TC Compass available in the UK?
Here, it has an MSRP of $399.00 and a common retail of $349.00 or $379.00 special with a Nikon 3-9x40mm scope.
It comes with 5R rifling, Winchester Model 70 style safety, and threaded barrels in 22 inches.
Guarantee is 1 MOA with factory ammunition.
Lots of chamberings, from .204 and .223 to .30-06.
Shame they stopped making the icon. Accountants suck
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Shame they stopped making the icon. Accountants suck
I just picked up a TC Icon stainless in .30-06 with a Nikon Monarch scope for less than half the original price of the rifle. I didn't need it, but the scope was worth the price. I will see how it shoots. It is solid as a rock.

The Icon had he misfortune of coming out when Obama was running for office and everyone was buying AR-15s and handguns like crazy. The bean counters who own TC, Caldwell, and Smith & Wesson won't still anything out. The same is true for Marlin, Winchester and Browning. Their marketing teams seem to know very little about what the customers want, much less how to develop markets for innovative new products.
 

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
The main issue is ITAR, costs a fair chunk to get the rifles out of the States and the importer either has to import lots to make it cheaper per unit and take a risk they won't sell, or import what he knows he can sell and pass the increased cost on.
One of the reasons that Howa and Bergara are doing very nicely here.

Really?
Import and Export papers on restricted goods don't add up to that much on a consignment
Shipping is universal regardless of where it is sourced from in the World.
$:£ Exchange rate is not as favourable as it has been but a $399 US RRP item even bought in small volumes and imported should not cost £399 retail in the UK regardless of what sector it is in.

If something doesnt sell its either at the wrong price, people who need one don't know its for sale or people don't know they need one yet.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Just finished a podcast from New Zealand and guys were long range shooting steel and deer .....let's not get into ethics of it ...not on this post .

But they guy had a Thomson dimension ....a switch barrel you can change calibers in under 5minutes with two tools one of which a torque wrench of some kind .
A high stock, which I think is getting a must for folk like me with short necks in order to get decent cheek wield ...even more so with NV stuff .
The rifling apparently lands are directly opposite each other and at 45 degree instead of 90 ....

What's advantage of all above ?
But he was putting first shot cold bore straight into steel plate at 800yards .

Sounds like decent rifle and for around $1300 NZ dollars

I'd like a look at one

Paul
 

Roro

Well-Known Member
Shame they stopped making the icon. Accountants suck

Samething happened with the true classic that was the savage 99 lever action.Accountants get involved and it all goes south very quickly.
 

Greener Jim

Well-Known Member
Really?
Import and Export papers on restricted goods don't add up to that much on a consignment
Shipping is universal regardless of where it is sourced from in the World.
$:£ Exchange rate is not as favourable as it has been but a $399 US RRP item even bought in small volumes and imported should not cost £399 retail in the UK regardless of what sector it is in.

If something doesnt sell its either at the wrong price, people who need one don't know its for sale or people don't know they need one yet.
I would presume you know about this than me being an RFD so an open to being wrong here. My understanding was that it's not just the export paperwork but the fact that you must go through specifically authorised shipping agents.
Rounding figures a little:
- £310 for rifle ($400)
- £270 export permit (this is a constant regardless of quantity)
- £500 shipping (what I was quoted for one rifle) best case is this would be a constant also and worst case is it's per rifle. I doubt both of these would be the case but for this example let's use the former.
- £60 VAT.
- Import end I don't know but let's just says it's free.

So that makes:
1 rifle-£1140
10 rifles-£447
20 rifles-£408.50

Thats distributor cost, now we have taken retail value there but it works nicely to show distributor mark up. There will then be a mark up by the RFD who will sell the rifle to Joe Public.
I don't think a rifle (or anything) should be the same monetary value just with a different currency, that would be silly and I didn't say that in my first post anyway.
However, my example does show that the largest costs are export/shipping, markup not being a cost to the distributor.
As I said, you likely know more so feel free to correct away.
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
Well I think the rifle Southern is refering to sells for about 600GBP here
600GBP = $775.

Original cost in USA $350 = 270GBP ?
 

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
I would presume you know about this than me being an RFD so an open to being wrong here. My understanding was that it's not just the export paperwork but the fact that you must go through specifically authorised shipping agents.
Rounding figures a little:
- £310 for rifle ($400)
- £270 export permit (this is a constant regardless of quantity)
- £500 shipping (what I was quoted for one rifle) best case is this would be a constant also and worst case is it's per rifle. I doubt both of these would be the case but for this example let's use the former.
- £60 VAT.
- Import end I don't know but let's just says it's free.

So that makes:
1 rifle-£1140
10 rifles-£447
20 rifles-£408.50

Thats distributor cost, now we have taken retail value there but it works nicely to show distributor mark up. There will then be a mark up by the RFD who will sell the rifle to Joe Public.
I don't think a rifle (or anything) should be the same monetary value just with a different currency, that would be silly and I didn't say that in my first post anyway.
However, my example does show that the largest costs are export/shipping, markup not being a cost to the distributor.
As I said, you likely know more so feel free to correct away.

Sorry, wasn't meant to be taken as criticism.
Its a racket and I was just highlighting some of the commonly misunderstood aspects

export papers are constant
shipping cost should a lot less than that
the price you quote is the RETAIL price in the US
if I was buying 20 of anything I would be paying the TRADE price
If I was bringing in 1000....etc etc

Considering Tikkas can be bought in the US for $600 RETAIL! the same application of costs must apply in that direction......yet the pricing is markedly lower.
I appreciate volumes in the US but Tikka is not a popular brand compared to Rem, Ruger and Savage among others...yet the pricing remains constant compared to them


I am cinical of the UK pricing structures when you see the actual costs from the makers of a lot of the things we just assume are expensive
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Samething happened with the true classic that was the savage 99 lever action.Accountants get involved and it all goes south very quickly.
I love the 99 , it's my favorite lever . Unfortunately , the tooling was in need of replacement and it required to much machining time . The bean counters dropped it and created an instantly collectable rifle . It's too bad , they are a great hunting rig .

AB
 

Roro

Well-Known Member
I love the 99 , it's my favorite lever . Unfortunately , the tooling was in need of replacement and it required to much machining time . The bean counters dropped it and created an instantly collectable rifle . It's too bad , they are a great hunting rig .

AB
They were ahead of their time in a lot of ways. No exposed hammer, the rotary magazine, chambered for proper bottleneck rifle cartridges, not revolver cartridges.
 
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