Interesting Nodes - Roe Doe

Everlong

Well-Known Member
On Thursday last week I shot this mature Roe Doe, behaving normally, at a range of 91 yards.

Initial inspection suggested a slight loss in body condition but nothing significant.

Rapid field gralloch showed nothing of concern. She wasn't pregnant. There were two of us, my friend is an extremely experienced stalker, we worked fast as there was a biblical shower rapidly approaching! Lungs looked perfect other than the .308" diameter hole.

Friday morning as I tidied up the carcass in the home larder (removing the back passage etc. rectum had been tied off in the field) I noticed a significantly enlarged lymph node in the fat within the pelvic region. In isolation, not too worried. However I also found that the sub-maxillary nodes were enlarged as I removed the head.

Yesterday I skinned and butchered the deer and found a small subcutaneous lesion on one side of her chest - hard and white - almost like a fat nodule beneath the skin, about 10mm in diameter. Then as I broke down the haunches the nodes within them were also found to be enlarged as were the prescapular nodes on both shoulders.

Nodes were not pussy or gritty but even so I notified the APHA vet of my findings and sent her images. She arraigned to visit today to inspect and take samples if necessary.

However I had a mail form her early this morning to say that she had reviewed the images with another senior vet and they were of the opinion that it wasn't TB so there was no need for her to visit or take samples. Needless to say we won't be consuming the carcass. Our local falconry will take full benefit.

Anyone seen anything like this?


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I can see why they've said, "Not TB" as TB nodes are normally cheesy/chalky/pussy. These look like normal, if slightly active lymph nodes, but one can't tell if the infection is recent or historic. Reasonable fat, so she should be pregnant, but you've noted a slight drop in condition. Wise not to eat - did the carcass set? If no then the infection is recent/current, if no then it's older.
 
I can see why they've said, "Not TB" as TB nodes are normally cheesy/chalky/pussy. These look like normal, if slightly active lymph nodes, but one can't tell if the infection is recent or historic. Reasonable fat, so she should be pregnant, but you've noted a slight drop in condition. Wise not to eat - did the carcass set? If no then the infection is recent/current, if no then it's older.
She was definitely not pregnant which struck us as unusual.

What concerned me was this image from the Deer Best Practice guide that says it shows sub-maxillary nodes from a TB positive deer. I think they look identical to the ones I found. I didn’t cut the sub-maxilliaries. None of the others were pussy/chalky so I can understand why they’ve made the decision.

Appreciate the reply. I’m happy with the decision to dispose rather than consume.

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