Is a bore guide necessary?

zambezi

Well-Known Member
And the moderator will collect any crap dragged out by the boresnake, surely? Which probably won't do it (the mod) any good.
Yup. And, logically, some of that detritus will be tipped back down the bore next time the barrel and mod are mated.

Many carry rifles on shoulder slings with muzzle up during stalks. That is plenty of time and agitation for the crud so deposited in the mod to be encouraged back into the bore. If you choose to walk with a round chambered, the carbon slough falling into the barrel is likely to build a mini sand castle between bullet and throat. I cannot see a better way to accelerate throat erosion.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Yup. And, logically, some of that detritus will be tipped back down the bore next time the barrel and mod are mated.

Many carry rifles on shoulder slings with muzzle up during stalks. That is plenty of time and agitation for the crud so deposited in the mod to be encouraged back into the bore. If you choose to walk with a round chambered, the carbon slough falling into the barrel is likely to build a mini sand castle between bullet and throat. I cannot see a better way to accelerate throat erosion.
Another good reason for me to continue carrying muzzle down...I was taking off the moderator one time and heard a loud rattle coming from it and a large flake of the deposited crud had cracked off one of the baffles...I managed to shake it out of the moderator but it did cross my mind that bits could come off at any time and trickle down to sit on the bolt face or the bullet ready to cause mayhem or score along the bore next bang.

Alan
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Another good reason for me to continue carrying muzzle down...I was taking off the moderator one time and heard a loud rattle coming from it and a large flake of the deposited crud had cracked off one of the baffles...I managed to shake it out of the moderator but it did cross my mind that bits could come off at any time and trickle down to sit on the bolt face or the bullet ready to cause mayhem or score along the bore next bang.

Alan
On this basis, if buying a well-used 2nd hand rifle, would it be reasonable to assume that the barrel is likely to be in better condition if it's never been screwcut?
 

1894

Well-Known Member
Sod all comes out of the barrel from a boresnake.

I bang my jetz on a piece of white paper - nothing comes out

Carry your rifle whichever way is safest its not going to affect barrel life
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
Sod all comes out of the barrel from a boresnake.

I bang my jetz on a piece of white paper - nothing comes out

Carry your rifle whichever way is safest its not going to affect barrel life
The lump of crud that came loose in mine was not deposited by a bore snake, it was just the build-up over the years from the gas/powder residue.

I was told by Simon Lawrence that the moderator had over 15,000 rounds through it before I bought the rifle it came with.

Alan
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
The lump of crud that came loose in mine was not deposited by a bore snake, it was just the build-up over the years from the gas/powder residue.
For all the reasons stated above, I store mods off the rifles. Before I offer them up to the rifle I tap them hard enough to dislodge anything loose. The steel units always spall a bit of rust and crud, the alloy units less so. Post shooting, I spray a little Silensave before returning mod to storage. And I carry my rifles muzzle down.
 

Primate

Well-Known Member
Hi all, is a bore guide that necessary when cleaning rifles or can I save myself £30-40 covering the comb in blue roll and going steady? Thanks
Lots of different answers here and everyone is entitled to their opinion. I personally use a bore guide and wouldn't want anyone rodding my rifles without one. I also respect the opinion of Ronin on here who I do not know, or have never met, however from my own research do know is a highly regarded gun Smith. You could compare using a bore guide to wearing a condom. Yeah ok you might get away with it but, keep on rodding without one and it could cost you dearly financially,and will cause irreparable damage to the bit where you load in your head :norty: beit 6mm purple nosler bullet or purple headed warrior. Aren't analogy's great
 
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enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
I've seen even wooden bore guides once sold by Parker Hale, by Edna Parker and still at Fulton's.

But much of the reason seems to have been to stop flexing, or "whip" where the rod passes through the rear receiver ring.

And on P-H rods scraping off the coating on the sear where it emerged up into the boltway.

For these "bore guides" fitted NOT in the chamber, oh no, but plugged into the rear receiver ring.

As I used Edna's superior dipped coated red rods it was never an issue. For as she never used to fail to say...this:

P-Hale rods used to strip their yellow coatings that it was said the firing point on Century Range at Bisley in the Imperial looked from afar as is sown with buttercups.
 

Blobby159

Well-Known Member
Here ya go... This fella pretty much encapsulates MY bore & general rifle cleaning regime.

It also answers WHY I use a BORE GUIDE and tried to explain - no doubt heavy handedly - near the start of this lengthy string...

B.T.W. This Aussie guy is well worth putting in your YouTube as a bookmark. Has a LOT of SENSE to say about his prime interest in rifle shooting, that of E.L.R. - or 'Extreme Long Range' rifle shooting, and he DOES MEAN LONG.. some of his shooting is in excess of 5,000yds, and regularly is at a mile and more from his shootingoint. He also reviews associated shooting products that he rates useful for his sport hobby, which is ALSO interesting and useful to read and inwardly absorption...

ATB ....... and shoot safely
 

Island

Well-Known Member
Reading through this thread makes me think that we really do choose the strangest things to get incensed about!

If you want to use a boreguide then use a boreguide, if you don't then don't.

However, when offering advice please try to remember that your opinion is solely that (i.e. YOUR opinion). Others will have differing opinions.

Let's all have a Christmas hug shall we?
 

Milligan

Well-Known Member
Reading through this thread makes me think that we really do choose the strangest things to get incensed about!

If you want to use a boreguide then use a boreguide, if you don't then don't.

However, when offering advice please try to remember that your opinion is solely that (i.e. YOUR opinion). Others will have differing opinions.

Let's all have a Christmas hug shall we?
if you write something on the internet sooner or later someone will come along and disagree with you.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Sorry YOU are very wrong, my 243 fired over 4000 rounds in its first 3 years and that started in 87, it still puts bullets exactly where pointed and that's from practical experience. If your re barrelled rifles are only good for 2000 rounds you must be using bright /mild steel. I still maintain most throats etc are not damaged by cleaning equipment, but by cleaning fluids. I get a lot of stalkers come here and one thing I notice regular is the damp patches on barrel ends, cases, etc, abrasive and corrosive chemicals and oils all left in chambers, throats and elsewhere. Oh yes I am SO sorry for my little spelling mistake, even though it was corrected in the next sentence or so.
Like you I have a .243 thats almost forty years old having fired many thousands of rounds, and is still just fine.
 

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