It’s been a while…

I haven’t been up to visit my son in Scotland since September, so when the opportunity came up we trotted. First light saw us kitting up and making our way up through a couple of fields to a gateway into a plantation. Cover was high but as we reached the gate the curse of the thermal hit us. Both of us could see a clearly defined head between some slim birch trees, no more than fifty yards away, but no amount of manoeuvring could get us a clear look at it through the cover. It was staring straight at us and bumping it was inevitable. We simply stood and waited until it thought better of being there and I got a glimpse of a russet rump as it trotted off towards the tree line, barking.

Ten minutes later and we were in a corner of a clearing. A fox shows itself in the thick grass and the decision made to take it. A rookie error costs me the shot…….. I aim at the top of its shoulder to compensate for the drop, and the fox trots off unharmed. A check of the turret and it’s still set for the 300 yard range last month. Still, as my son wisely said, good job we found that out on a fox and not a deer!

A bit of a climb up along a forest ride to the start of the open hill. James tells me that the roe come out into the hill to browse and to watch the corners of the forestry blocks. After five minutes a doe appears onto a stretch of lush grass from the edge of the trees at a measured 275 yards. A wait of no more than two minutes and sure enough a buck makes his way out towards her, sniffing and tasting the air as he did so. They disappeared from view as they walked forwards, obviously making their way along a shallow gulley towards the open ground. Now was our chance. We could slip along the wood edge, keeping the ridge of the gulley between us and them, before striking off in a straight line towards them. The plan worked perfectly, and the point at which the head of the doe appeared I set the sticks up an estimated 125 yards from her. As I mounted the rifle the head and back of the buck appeared. They both sauntered unhurriedly forwards and more and more of the buck appeared. At the point his chest appeared I slipped off the safety catch, steadied the rifle and waited for him to stop. Sure enough he put his head down and that was my chance.


The impact sounded impressive, and I watched him stagger off. Thought he looked a bit hunched but he was out of view almost immediately so I took a mark/ transit on where he’d been standing. We left the sticks and set off to find him. I reckoned I was more or less where he was and sure enough I saw him lying ten yards away below the ridge. He hadnt been hunched, I’d simply seen him stagger downhill five yards to where he dropped.


Anyway, who needs hill ponies? 3C3BE8D3-D27B-4F0D-A3F0-BB5E4C3206B6.jpeg
 

Namman

Well-Known Member
I haven’t been up to visit my son in Scotland since September, so when the opportunity came up we trotted. First light saw us kitting up and making our way up through a couple of fields to a gateway into a plantation. Cover was high but as we reached the gate the curse of the thermal hit us. Both of us could see a clearly defined head between some slim birch trees, no more than fifty yards away, but no amount of manoeuvring could get us a clear look at it through the cover. It was staring straight at us and bumping it was inevitable. We simply stood and waited until it thought better of being there and I got a glimpse of a russet rump as it trotted off towards the tree line, barking.

Ten minutes later and we were in a corner of a clearing. A fox shows itself in the thick grass and the decision made to take it. A rookie error costs me the shot…….. I aim at the top of its shoulder to compensate for the drop, and the fox trots off unharmed. A check of the turret and it’s still set for the 300 yard range last month. Still, as my son wisely said, good job we found that out on a fox and not a deer!

A bit of a climb up along a forest ride to the start of the open hill. James tells me that the roe come out into the hill to browse and to watch the corners of the forestry blocks. After five minutes a doe appears onto a stretch of lush grass from the edge of the trees at a measured 275 yards. A wait of no more than two minutes and sure enough a buck makes his way out towards her, sniffing and tasting the air as he did so. They disappeared from view as they walked forwards, obviously making their way along a shallow gulley towards the open ground. Now was our chance. We could slip along the wood edge, keeping the ridge of the gulley between us and them, before striking off in a straight line towards them. The plan worked perfectly, and the point at which the head of the doe appeared I set the sticks up an estimated 125 yards from her. As I mounted the rifle the head and back of the buck appeared. They both sauntered unhurriedly forwards and more and more of the buck appeared. At the point his chest appeared I slipped off the safety catch, steadied the rifle and waited for him to stop. Sure enough he put his head down and that was my chance.


The impact sounded impressive, and I watched him stagger off. Thought he looked a bit hunched but he was out of view almost immediately so I took a mark/ transit on where he’d been standing. We left the sticks and set off to find him. I reckoned I was more or less where he was and sure enough I saw him lying ten yards away below the ridge. He hadnt been hunched, I’d simply seen him stagger downhill five yards to where he dropped.


Anyway, who needs hill ponies? View attachment 213984
A classic example of why I believe Hunting scopes should be zeroed and left at that. All this dialling in ranges is a recipe for disaster. I've seen it many times. The same goes for leaving variable scopes on their highest power.
A lot to be said for classic 6x42's !!!
 

patrickt

Well-Known Member
A classic example of why I believe Hunting scopes should be zeroed and left at that. All this dialling in ranges is a recipe for disaster. I've seen it many times. The same goes for leaving variable scopes on their highest power.
A lot to be said for classic 6x42's !!!
don't spoil a good write up!!, we have all done it, and as said it could have been a deer, but a clean miss in any event!!

Patrick
 

Scapegoat

Well-Known Member
A classic example of why I believe Hunting scopes should be zeroed and left at that. All this dialling in ranges is a recipe for disaster. I've seen it many times. The same goes for leaving variable scopes on their highest power.
A lot to be said for classic 6x42's !!!
Quite right of course. But the rifle doubles up as a target rifle, and is perfectly capable of shots out to silly distances. My fault for not dialling it back down after the range session, and again for not checking it this morning. Cost me the shot, but serendipity meant it didn’t cost me the buck. Lesson learnt for next time!!!!
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
It is always helpful when folk post tales of their "stalking dramas".

It takes courage and integrity to do so. It is how we all learn.

It is also how, those who make mistakes, are reassured that they are not alone. The air industry operates a "no blame" reporting policy which encourages and promotes the self-reporting of errors, in order that learning can take place. Vital if lives are to be saved and lessons learned.

It is to be applauded.

If I should ever make an "error", why, I would be the first to share it with the SD world - safe and secure in the knowledge that I would be supported in doing so.








Just need to make my first error really...🤥
 
Top