I've got cow in the wood!

cjs66

Well-Known Member
#1
Hi all. Would having cows in the woods chase deer away? Since the farmer put his cows (about 20) in the wood I stalk, the deer have disappeared from all their usual haunts. So much so that the last twice I've been, I've not seen a thing. I know they are still knocking about in the top end where it's thick and very hard to stalk up on them. All the signs are there but it's so noisy walking, they must be hearing me coming... Any advice. Ta. cjs
 

Neumo

Well-Known Member
#2
This came up when I was talking to Sikamalc the last time I was out with him and I remember him saying that Roe don't like to share land with Livestock, so will not come back onto such land for a week or so after the livestock have left. I am sure an expert will be along in a minute to give us the whole story, as I would be interested to know which deer do this. I seem to remember that he said that Fallow are not usually bothered by livestock (but could be wrong)
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
#3
From my limited experiance, it depends on the size of the field, we used to have 42acre park. 150milkers and we would get fallow and reds in there, not in amongst them but in the same field, same for sheep, roe we did not see, but then again this is the new forest, so the deer see other livestock all the time.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
#4
2p worth
And be interested in the outcome of the post, I have Had this with roe and sheep but shot lots of roe in woods and fields that cows use , seen fallow on farms that have had cattle In or around the same fields.
 

cjs66

Well-Known Member
#5
It's Roe only and they've only changed there haunts since the cows have gone into the woods. The cows have always been in the fields around the woods. The farmer puts them in the front part of the wood this time of year out of the weather,(no cow shed) they are also fed in the front part so just hang around there. I'd of thought the deer would of been used to them but ? Do you think things will return to normal in a while or am I going to have to change my approach? And if so how? cjs
 

Hungry hunter

Well-Known Member
#6
Don't know about roe but from my experience with sika is they don't like sharing with sheep and fallow didn't pal around with horses. I had to pack in a lease that horses had taken over.
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
#7
I've never seen any deer in a field or hill which has or recent had sheep in it - even in the depths of winter when in-lamb ewes were being fed with hay and pellets. It usually takes a few showers of rain to "clean" the land.

I'd say from experience the effect is less with cattle - but still there. I've taken a couple of roe this year from fields with cattle in, but when the ground gets poached round feeders they don't seem to come anywhere near.
 

Trufflehunting

Well-Known Member
#8
God made cows out of Meat therefore he intended us to eat them
Shoot them instead of deer and freezer them, farmer will help move them with his tracktor as they dont make money from them its published they loose money on milk
Offer the farmer some meat
Once his neigbours get to know, you will be offered there cow hunting
Happy Farmers thats what you want, make a farmer smile for christmas !!!!
 

novice

Well-Known Member
#9
I can't imagine a load of cows poaching the ground will do much for the woodland floor or the available browse. I dare say the deer have retreated to the thick stuff as that's where the remaining food is.

Novice
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#10
Cows seem to be very effective at deterring roe.

However, if they're removed in time for the spring flush, the weeds that grow back where they've been trampling seem to be very attractive, and the roe arrive back in numbers a week or two after the cows are gone. I had one area that had cows in it for far too long over a wet winter, and it looked like the Somme. No roe seen in that field for about 6 months. In the month after the cows were taken out (late April-May), I shot 9 roe in less than an acre. Sadly, there are now sheep in that field more or less permanently, and I hardly ever see roe there (plenty over the fence).
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#11
Once his neigbours get to know, you will be offered there cow hunting
Just be aware that a roe sack will be too small though...................

I was once told that you'd never see deer in any field with stock in it, or one that had recently been stocked. Too much competition for feeding, maybe? No idea
 

Von

Well-Known Member
#12
Hi all. Would having cows in the woods chase deer away? Since the farmer put his cows (about 20) in the wood I stalk, the deer have disappeared from all their usual haunts. So much so that the last twice I've been, I've not seen a thing. I know they are still knocking about in the top end where it's thick and very hard to stalk up on them. All the signs are there but it's so noisy walking, they must be hearing me coming... Any advice. Ta. cjs
Roe hate stock. Hares are the same. I've got a cracking 300acre rough hill I stalk here in the borders and have done for the last 15 years. The farmer has a deal with me that he will only put cattle on the hill for two months of the year. Nov / Dec normally. I never go back to that piece of ground until at least March regarding catching up with any deer again, its not worth going any quicker due to the mess that the cattle have made. I normally shoot between 15-20 deer of it.

The fact the farmer is letting the cattle into your woods is not a good thing either. They take all the bottom out and if the trees are soft wood smash all the lower branches and leave the wood cold normally as well, and their S**T takes months to disappear due to not being exposed the elements the same as out in the open.

Other deer species like Red / Sika tolerate stock a lot beter

Not good
 
Last edited:

David Brown

Well-Known Member
#13
As has been alluded to byVon . It is not just the present disturbance that is a worry but the altering of the character of the woodland by Cattle that should be of most concern. They will strip out all the understory, kill all saplings and poach the forest floor. The result will be a ruination of this wood as a significant habitat for most species ,not just deer, and it will take years not months to recover . If it ever does. A moorland near to me had a large herd of cattle put onto it about six years ago. They ate off all the Blaeberry, destroyed the Young Juniper stands , stripped and killed the scrub birch and broke through the surface vegetation with their feet leaving huge poached areas. To this day you can still see the black poached scars and the scrub is still absent. What would our authorities do if this level of damage was caused by DEER. There would be an outcry and a rush to apportion blame followed by a visit from deer killing teams to wipe out everything !!!!!! Hardly seems fair does it?

David
 

Von

Well-Known Member
#14
As has been alluded to byVon . It is not just the present disturbance that is a worry but the altering of the character of the woodland by Cattle that should be of most concern. They will strip out all the understory, kill all saplings and poach the forest floor. The result will be a ruination of this wood as a significant habitat for most species ,not just deer, and it will take years not months to recover . If it ever does. A moorland near to me had a large herd of cattle put onto it about six years ago. They ate off all the Blaeberry, destroyed the Young Juniper stands , stripped and killed the scrub birch and broke through the surface vegetation with their feet leaving huge poached areas. To this day you can still see the black poached scars and the scrub is still absent. What would our authorities do if this level of damage was caused by DEER. There would be an outcry and a rush to apportion blame followed by a visit from deer killing teams to wipe out everything !!!!!! Hardly seems fair does it?

David
Top reply David :thumb:
 

Tartan_Terrier

Well-Known Member
#15
Doesn't sound like a good situation at all. I hope you can persuade the farmer to stop it.

On the bright side (with regard to the thread title), I'm glad to hear that you've got cow in the wood, and not the other way round.... :lol:
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
#16
The fact the farmer is letting the cattle into your woods is not a good thing either.
To be fair, it IS the farmer's wood, so he can really do what he pleases.

There is a somewhat unrealistic attitude that creeps in on here occasionally that the land we stalk over is somehow 'ours', and should be managed to optimise our needs as stalkers. This is usually not the case. Most of us are very lucky to be granted access to the land - and should probably be very careful about being vocally critical of the lanowners decisions. I have seen more than one stalker get booted off after being a little too agressive in his demands on the landowner...
 

pablo.222

Well-Known Member
#17
Roe hate stock. Hares are the same. I've got a cracking 300acre rough hill I stalk here in the borders and have done for the last 15 years. The farmer has a deal with me that he will only put cattle on the hill for two months of the year. Nov / Dec normally. I never go back to that piece of ground until at least March regarding catching up with any deer again, its not worth going any quicker due to the mess that the cattle have made. I normally shoot between 15-20 deer of it.

The fact the farmer is letting the cattle into your woods is not a good thing either. They take all the bottom out and if the trees are soft wood smash all the lower branches and leave the wood cold normally as well, and their S**T takes months to disappear due to not being exposed the elements the same as out in the open.

Other deer species like Red / Sika tolerate stock a lot beter

Not good


You must pay top doller before u get too tell the farmer where and when he can put his livestock?
 

Von

Well-Known Member
#18
You must pay top doller before u get too tell the farmer where and when he can put his livestock?
The farmer and I have a very very good relationship and long may it continue. I also get paid for managing the deer on the estate as well and likewise long may it continue.
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
#19
To be fair, it IS the farmer's wood, so he can really do what he pleases.

There is a somewhat unrealistic attitude that creeps in on here occasionally that the land we stalk over is somehow 'ours', and should be managed to optimise our needs as stalkers. This is usually not the case. Most of us are very lucky to be granted access to the land - and should probably be very careful about being vocally critical of the lanowners decisions. I have seen more than one stalker get booted off after being a little too agressive in his demands on the landowner...
+1
What would the authority's say ?, we actually use cattle to achive, control of brambles and first story undergrowth.
the result is regeneration of wild flowers, which is beneficial to butterfly's , bees etc,
 

sh1kar

Well-Known Member
#20
Agree with Taff - just to add a bit of balance here and recognise slightly off topic, there is substantial use of cattle for conservation grazing, particularly down south here to maintain heathland. British White and Dexters being the favourites. They are used particularly because they are less damaging than the alternative of heavy plant using swipes etc in churning the place up or spraying and pretty selective on grazing to promote bio diverse habitats, Suspect same may be said of some heather based moorlands where burning is difficult but don't know enough about that

D
 

Top