Jelen Deer Services: thanks

Mat

Well-Known Member
Credit where it's due: Mike answered all my (newbie) questions before I won the Ebay auction. Norman, aka Normski, (who took me out) was friendly, chatty and informative. I always knew what we were doing, why we were doing it.

The first day, the 3 roe that we stalked, 1 definitely had too good a head (I wasn't after a trophy) and the others wondered into the woods and did not reappear before Norman could fully assess the price tag :)

The second day, after a long stalk the long way around a field, the first roe was a 6-pointer, the second was a doe and the third was nowhere to be seen. By the time we got to around 150 yards away, we were getting closer in the hope the third unidentified roe would appear. The first two were still totally oblivious, the 6-pointer happily sunning himself and the doe munching away. Then a fox appeared into view, so the rifle was hurriedly deployed on the bipod, despite Norman whistling at it to get its attention, it too was totally oblivious. I had to reposition a bit as it meandered through the field, but then it cleared all cover into the edge of the field about 50 yards in front, broadside on, BANG and it was toast! On closer inspection, I'd hit it in the gut, centre of body where I'd been aiming.

Meanwhile, Norman observed the roe, the 2 in view scarpered quickly and there was still no sign of the third which must have wondered away when we weren't looking.

Anyway, although it was slightly disappointing that I didn't get a roe, I still got a shot at something and I was easily in a position to take a shot at a roe, it was only because they weren't right. And on the plus side, the wife and in-laws were pleased that it was a fox that got shot and not a deer...
 

tartinjock

Distinguished Member
I wa sout with them in Decenber, Mike is a nice bloke who did his best to get me onto Deer, I did, one on the evening and another in the morning

Good set up.

TJ
 

stone

Well-Known Member
Mat said:
The first day, the 3 roe that we stalked, 1 definitely had too good a head (I wasn't after a trophy) and the others wondered into the woods and did not reappear before Norman could fully assess the price tag :)
hi mat
this type of assesment has always been my pet hate, since a stalker i used devon way always priced the buck in sight accordingly to what it would cost me to pull the trigger , since then i find out the cost of the shot before i book
ie: price of cull buck
price of bronze upwards
so when on the stalk the stalker can say cull buck or medal head as soon as he sees it and you don't waste time stalking a medal head when you are stalking cull bucks, sometimes you need to stalk closer to get a better look as not all good heads are medal heads, this is not a dig at jelen just it is not a method i agree with
glad you had a cracking time and looks like you realy enjoyed it , hope you hav many more
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
Just to clarify: the price list was fixed beforehand, I didn't pay much attention to it, as I wasn't interested in a trophy. Also, as I'd won the Ebay auction in the middle of last month, ideally the stalks would have happened during doe season (but didn't as no one was available to take me out over Easter and I was away the weekend after... I gather that normally, a cull buck would have cost £60 and had I been able to shoot one, then the cost would have been waived.

I didn't mean that Normski was plucking a figure out of the air :oops:
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
...And yes, we did have to get closer to decide whether it was a cull buck or not... If only I'd had my Kowa spotting scope to have a look from afar :lol:
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
Hi Mat.
Why did you shoot the Fox in the gut, your chosen point of aim ?
Surely it would have been more sensible and humane to shoot the unfortunate sod in the heart/lung area.

HWH.
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
I did ask where to shoot it, the reply was "anywhere". The rifle was a 25-06 so I guess the thinking was that shot placement wasn't crucial. I aimed in the middle because I didn't want to miss. In any case, the fox was knocked over, didn't know what had hit it, didn't get up and was dead when we got to it, so I don't think it suffered. The thought did cross my mind as to what knocked it out: shock, catastrophic loss in blood pressure?
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
`Anywhere` is a pratts answer and one not to be followed.
If we have to kill things it is our duty to attempt to do so in a sensible and humane manner and for people lacking experience the broadside `boiler room`is the shot to take.
It gives the largest target area which is vunerable.
Also ANY shot placement is `crucial`irrespective of calibre used.

HWH.
 

TONY M

Well-Known Member
Excellent stag 1933, perfect, and I mean PERECT answer!
On my travels through life, I have come to the conclusion that every
profession is made up of three classes of individual, good, bad and indifferent.
I`m sorry to say our sport/profession contains exactly the same mix;
But! If people like stag1933 are willing to stand up and be counted, and
hopefully copied, then maybe ? the bad and indifferent will be reduced.
TONY M.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Hi Tony,
May I echo your words and say that Mr Stag is spot on as always! Mr Stag is an absolute treasure and like many I look forward to his posts. I've been the wrong side of him on at least one occasion and I admit freely that I was wrong. The best medicine is the worst tasting but its effects are the longest lasting. :lol:
Fox, Charlie or Reynard, whatever you like to call him is a beautiful creature that goes about his business as nature intended. Just because he is at odds with our own personal take on countryside management doesn't mean that we should kill him badly or leave him suffering. Kill him well and true and when you stand over him show him some courtesy before you throw his smashed body in the ditch. Are we not gentlemen of our sport after all?
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
jelen deer services thanks.

Over the years I have shot, snared and killed in various ways literally thousands of foxes, and I am completely aware of the natural destructive nature of this predator. However, in all those years except for when I was really young, I have always felt a twinge of regret when accounting for a fox.
Along with us they are a top predator and were it not for our superior brain we would not stand a chance of getting on terms with them. Latterly, I have almost ceased my snaring activities preferring the rifle, which if used properly and in the right calibre for the range should ensure a swift and humane end. Never should a shot be taken deliberately anywhere except the accepted kill zone, and that is NOT the gut area. Pest they may be, but they and all of our quarry deserve better.
 

TONY M

Well-Known Member
Thank you Mr B and old keeper, your post`s as usual are more eloquently written than mine :)
More importantly, if these post`s are viewed by the less experienced,
or newcomers to our sport, It might just guide them in the right direction.
Even viewed by non shooters, It would certainly do the sport no harm?
Thank you, to two more gentlemen of the sport.
TONY M.
 

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