Kentucky Fried Partridge - for people with only one free hand (e.g. new parents...)

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone.

Last Sunday evening, having spent another weekend mostly looking after a baby (Pine Martine) and her support network (Mrs PM chiefly, and YPM too), I thought I'd try and make something for dinner that I actually enjoyed to provide an impression of having done something for the grownups. I had two red partridges in the freezer from Oracle's shoot back in November (I'd only shot one, but then Oracle tied another one to it for balance and portion size) and reckoned these could make great finger food for people holding a baby. Partridge isn't a very strongly flavoured meat, so it lends itself well to this sort of preparation.

First of all, I cut off the legs and breasts, the carcasses going in a soup later. I did not remove the skin, and this didn't go down well with Mrs PM, so I will now recommend that you do remove it. Put that in the soup too for flavour. Anyway, I then put the legs and breasts in a freezer bag with a couple of tablespoons of plain flour, salt, pepper, hot smoked paprika and just plain paprika. I didn't use enough for my own tastes: I recommend that you go to town on the seasoning. And be creative at this point! Next time, I'll through in some Cayenne, why not some curry powder, or your Secret Blend of Herbs and Spices. I shook this around a bit so that all the pieces were evenly coated, then dipped them all in a beaten egg. One was just about enough for the two partridges. Finally, the pieces were all dipped an coated in breadcrumbs. It can be a bit messy as a preparation process. Especially with just one hand. If you need to, ask a Young PM to hold the bowl while you beat the egg.

Then, I poured about 15mm of vegetable oil in a large frying pan, and heated it until when I dropped a pinch of breadcrumbs in, they immediately started bubbling. Then the pieces of partridge go in until they're golden and crispy on one side, then over they go, and as they are totally fried all over, they are fished out and placed on kitchen paper. Now I daresay they would have benefited from some clever dipping sauce, but all I had to (single) hand was ketchup and Tabasco.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is One-Handed Kentucky Fried Partridge! It's finger-burnin' good!
 

potshotpat

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone.

Last Sunday evening, having spent another weekend mostly looking after a baby (Pine Martine) and her support network (Mrs PM chiefly, and YPM too), I thought I'd try and make something for dinner that I actually enjoyed to provide an impression of having done something for the grownups. I had two red partridges in the freezer from Oracle's shoot back in November (I'd only shot one, but then Oracle tied another one to it for balance and portion size) and reckoned these could make great finger food for people holding a baby. Partridge isn't a very strongly flavoured meat, so it lends itself well to this sort of preparation.

First of all, I cut off the legs and breasts, the carcasses going in a soup later. I did not remove the skin, and this didn't go down well with Mrs PM, so I will now recommend that you do remove it. Put that in the soup too for flavour. Anyway, I then put the legs and breasts in a freezer bag with a couple of tablespoons of plain flour, salt, pepper, hot smoked paprika and just plain paprika. I didn't use enough for my own tastes: I recommend that you go to town on the seasoning. And be creative at this point! Next time, I'll through in some Cayenne, why not some curry powder, or your Secret Blend of Herbs and Spices. I shook this around a bit so that all the pieces were evenly coated, then dipped them all in a beaten egg. One was just about enough for the two partridges. Finally, the pieces were all dipped an coated in breadcrumbs. It can be a bit messy as a preparation process. Especially with just one hand. If you need to, ask a Young PM to hold the bowl while you beat the egg.

Then, I poured about 15mm of vegetable oil in a large frying pan, and heated it until when I dropped a pinch of breadcrumbs in, they immediately started bubbling. Then the pieces of partridge go in until they're golden and crispy on one side, then over they go, and as they are totally fried all over, they are fished out and placed on kitchen paper. Now I daresay they would have benefited from some clever dipping sauce, but all I had to (single) hand was ketchup and Tabasco.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is One-Handed Kentucky Fried Partridge! It's finger-burnin' good!
Do you do Deliveroo. NOW !!:p:tiphat:
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Do you do Deliveroo. NOW !!:p:tiphat:
It's more that I'm all out of partridges. I have one pheasant and one roe haunch left in the freezer. Keeping the latter for the barbecue. But I hope, at some point, I'll be allowed back out in search of a refill. That's what a drilling is for: a muntjac with the rifle barrel and a couple of pigeons or rabbits on the way home with the shotgun barrels. If I actually had that sort of opportunity.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
I've done pheasant breasts like that. The flour, egg and crumb coating keeps the meat nice and moist. Like the idea of the flour and spice mix in a poly bag. Why have i not thought of that?
 

tikka_madras

Well-Known Member
We do something very similar, but use paprika, salt, cayennne and plenty of white pepper (and mustard powder if you want) in the flour.

With bigger bits of rabbit leg etc you can poach it gently first until tender then flour/egg/flour and fry it quickly in very hot oil until golden.
 

captdavid

Well-Known Member
Next time use tenderized venison and make country gravy. Strap some to your head and your tongue will beat you to death getting to it!!!!:D:tiphat: capt david
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Next time use tenderized venison and make country gravy. Strap some to your head and your tongue will beat you to death getting to it!!!!:D:tiphat: capt david
Interesting, how do you tenderise the venison? I tend to have smaller deer or young ones which don't require it. Tougher bits are cooked appropriately, slowly...

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Ah OK, yes, oldschool tenderising method! I can hit meat with a mallet, no problem! Now, I just need to shoot a new one. I think white tail are more the size of a fallow than a roe though. Either way, sounds good, thanks!

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

captdavid

Well-Known Member
Never tried, never will. I never liked liver until my one trip to Africa in79. Antelope liver and onions were cooked on the grill. Since I returned venison liver and onions has become of my most favorite. I did try squirrel livers once. Those, along with fowl, I don't care for. capt david
 

captdavid

Well-Known Member
They're relatively common, I've never realy wanted one. Some acquaintance's have them and have offered to fry a turkey for me, but never have. They'er big and I might use one, and the 2 gallons of oil that they use twice per year. I just don't see the need. Fried turkey is suppose to be good, but I've also never been around any being served. capt david
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
Fried Turkey is the best way, hands down, to serve and eat Turkey. I have been a turkey hunter for a very long time, and my grandfather was also a turkey farmer. Sorta like the line from Forest Gump ( Theres Fried turkey, and smoked turkey, and baked turkey, and grilled turkey, etc....)

There are two main types of fryers - the first is the common "big pot" that sits on a burner. This is also the one that every year causes at least one house to burn down (lots of precautionary videos out there put out by Fire Departments). Two gallons of oil, above an open flame - recipe for kitchen flambe'

The other type of fryer (I have both) has an immersion heater in it. This allows me to swap it out and use to heat water (shrimp or crawfish boils) or heat oil. Because it is electric - never any issue of burning down the house.

One thing about the deep fried anything is choice of oil. Lots of different oils out there - but Peanut Oil is far and away the best for flavor and allowing repeated use. Some of the light or healthy oils (such as Canola) begin to break down quickly with the heat level needed for frying.
 

Top