Knife making first attempt

tusker

Well-Known Member
Well done mate, now the fun begins. What steel did you use? try to remember fit and finish are very important. crack on!
Tusker
 

David E

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the Nice reply’s. It was Nice to do, like someone alteady mentioned, something my Son wil not forget.

As for the steel We used 80 Crv2 steel


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Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
Well done, better than my first attempt!

One thing that looks nice is if you get yourself a countersink drill then countersink the tube holes, just a tad though.

You can also grind the kydex a lot closer to the eyelets , you will be safe if you leave a tad of meat in front of them, might also want to either heat it up for longer and if you have a press wedge something in it so it goes tighter so you get a more precise image of the blade.

Grinds just take lots of practice and using a black marker will help you see where you are removing metal and not......makes it a lot easier.

You also look like you have taken the edge down enough so the secondary bevel will be sharp, well done. …….a rough guide is a mm or less.

Nice wee knives, now make some more and never get rid of your first knife as that's a reference for all future knives.
 

malmick

Well-Known Member
They are great for first attempts and your lad will cherish the memory and tool for life. Thanks for showing us.

@Peter Eaton thanks for sharing hints and advice, if those are better than your first attempt then you've covered quite a distance!
 

Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
They are great for first attempts and your lad will cherish the memory and tool for life. Thanks for showing us.

@Peter Eaton thanks for sharing hints and advice, if those are better than your first attempt then you've covered quite a distance!
For a first attempt they are cracking as you haven't gone for the normal first knife most people make which is a Scandi grind which is by far the easiest grind. I just noticed the question regarding the wet and dry. Yes this can be done but a high grit wont do anything buy show any imperfections, in fact it most likely wouldn't touch those blades.
The way to go is lower grits in graduations using opposite directions in order to remove the previous grit lines, I sometimes start as low as 120 grit when though the blade has come off the grinder at 400 grit. Maybe working from 120 -800 then for the final lines dropping back to 600 for a perfect satin finshish .

Remember though this must all be done before the handle is on as you will never be able to sand up to the handle once in place.

With regards distance.....12 years of learning in my case :oops:

Hope you get to 'blood' the knives soon.

Well done
 

Longstrider

Well-Known Member
I suspect that the sheath has been left as wide as it is so that a fitting like a Tek-Lok can be fitted to it without any overhang ?

They're damned good blades for first attempts ! No way were my first knives so neat, but they were made when the metalwork teacher wasn't looking when I was at school :lol:

Good to see first blades being made from 'proper' blade steel too. So many people believe the Youtube rubbish that old mower blades etc will do .. and it won't ;)

How did you heat treat ? HT is the key to a good blade IMO. Even if the knife ends up ugly it will be a useable tool if the heat treat is good. The prettiest knife in the world is useless if the blade is not heat treated well.
 

David E

Well-Known Member
Considering the heat threat I don’t remember the exact temperature but we put it in a special oven to heat to a certain temperature and a certain time and then could it down by moving it around in some kind of oil mixture, afterwards we could hit the metal and it didn’t leave any marks, the difference in the hardness off the steel before and after the heat threat wAs remarkable .

I already liked nice knives before and knew it took a lot of skills/ craftsmanship but after making one yourself you have even more respect for those guys who can make beautiful knives, and of course now you think less off the so called custom knive makers wich just buy the blade ready and only make the handle ( like one I met in Iceland and still wanted over 400€ for a knife )




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David E

Well-Known Member
One or two perhaps, but not by me 'coz I'm a good boy ;)


Aah, sounds like you had professional help with the heat treating then ? Good move.
Yes, we wanted to make a first knif together but also one we would like to keep so we got some help and advice on how to make it :)



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