Lack of Roe kids

NigelM

Well-Known Member
Has anyone noticed a reduction in the % of Roe kids this year?

The bit of ground I have been stalking for the past 15 years has always had a healthy reproductive rate. At this time of year the majority of mature does usually have twins at heel. The total population is only around 60 in the central area of the estate.

I tend to count in Dec/Jan, shoot the does in Jan/Feb/March and then leave the ground alone until the rut when I will start the buck cull with a bit of calling fun. Post harvest you can start to see what's about and for the past few weeks I have noticed a distinct lack of kids.

Last night for example we saw 5 mature does. One had twins at heel, the other four appeared to be barren. They were all observed at distance travelling from woodland plot to woodland plot across stubble in the two hours before dusk.

The lack of kids is a little worrying. The Dec count should confirm, but I wondered if anyone else had noticed anything similar this year. It has been an odd one weather wise after all.
 

ashray

Well-Known Member
not seeing many and the fox numbers have increased so more foxes more fawns/kids killed less fawns/kids seen/left alive
 
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novice

Well-Known Member
Has anyone noticed a reduction in the % of Roe kids this year?

The bit of ground I have been stalking for the past 15 years has always had a healthy reproductive rate. At this time of year the majority of mature does usually have twins at heel. The total population is only around 60 in the central area of the estate.

I tend to count in Dec/Jan, shoot the does in Jan/Feb/March and then leave the ground alone until the rut when I will start the buck cull with a bit of calling fun. Post harvest you can start to see what's about and for the past few weeks I have noticed a distinct lack of kids.

Last night for example we saw 5 mature does. One had twins at heel, the other four appeared to be barren. They were all observed at distance travelling from woodland plot to woodland plot across stubble in the two hours before dusk.

The lack of kids is a little worrying. The Dec count should confirm, but I wondered if anyone else had noticed anything similar this year. It has been an odd one weather wise after all.

Has there been any change in farming practices in the past 12 months? Suppose an increased acerage down to silage could make a significant difference.

Novice
 

tarponhead

Well-Known Member
Has there been any change in farming practices in the past 12 months? Suppose an increased acerage down to silage could make a significant difference.

Novice

Noticed near me too. i wonder if the lack of rabbits means that foxes predate the fawns more frequently?
 
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NigelM

Well-Known Member
Has there been any change in farming practices in the past 12 months? Suppose an increased acerage down to silage could make a significant difference.

Novice

No significant changes at all. Harvest stated a bit early but none of the guys have chopped up any kids in the process, I checked with them yesterday.

The foxes have certainly done well. I'm not allowed to shoot the foxes for various reasons and I have seen a few more about. This could be one answer. All the deer are looking a bit skinny, a result of a lack of food due to the drought I would think, which could be another answer.
 

shakey jake

Well-Known Member
Sorry for the hi jac but what is the correct term for young roe, fawn, faun or kid?
Only seen one roe last week with one youngster
Shakey
 

Cottis

Well-Known Member
No significant changes at all. Harvest stated a bit early but none of the guys have chopped up any kids in the process, I checked with them yesterday.

The foxes have certainly done well. I'm not allowed to shoot the foxes for various reasons and I have seen a few more about. This could be one answer. All the deer are looking a bit skinny, a result of a lack of food due to the drought I would think, which could be another answer.

What sort of farm is it? We have had to open all our fields to the cattle so they can make use of whatever grass there is, which isn't much. There has been some supplementary feeding going on and with all fields seeing livestock traffic all the time rather than the standard rest and rotation, it has made it difficult for a number of wild animals who are used to certain movements. I find the Roe (and Muntjac a little bit) don't like hanging around the fields when livestock are present. Rabbit numbers have also dropped with fox numbers increasing noticeably. Factor in lack of cover and quality green food and I suppose it all adds up.

I will be back outside more in the cold months once the cattle are in the sheds. Reduction in vegetation will allow better idea of of numbers but it wouldn't surprise me to see a few less than normal.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
What sort of farm is it? We have had to open all our fields to the cattle so they can make use of whatever grass there is, which isn't much. There has been some supplementary feeding going on and with all fields seeing livestock traffic all the time rather than the standard rest and rotation, it has made it difficult for a number of wild animals who are used to certain movements. I find the Roe (and Muntjac a little bit) don't like hanging around the fields when livestock are present. Rabbit numbers have also dropped with fox numbers increasing noticeably. Factor in lack of cover and quality green food and I suppose it all adds up.

I will be back outside more in the cold months once the cattle are in the sheds. Reduction in vegetation will allow better idea of of numbers but it wouldn't surprise me to see a few less than normal.

Thankfully it's all arable without a sheep or a cow in sight.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Sorry for the hi jac but what is the correct term for young roe, fawn, faun or kid?
Only seen one roe last week with one youngster
Shakey

DSC1 handbook says kid, as does the deer stalking handbook by Graham Downing. However, observers book of wild animals says fawn, as does Collins complete British wildlife.
Take your pick!
I've always thought it was kid. Fallow deer have fawns. Either way, it's definitely not faun.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Up here we had a strange winter - don’t think the Does went into winter in any sort of condition. They were all pretty skinny. We then had a late life by cold snap and suspect that many foetuses just got aborted / or even never even got implanted. I shot three does in February during the snow. None had any fat on whatsoever. In then took a long time for any grass to appear because of cold spring, and then got dry and warm. In June all the grass was looking brown and burnt. Thus not a lot of good food for Roe, so any that did have fawns would nt have had a lot of milk so chances are lost several. I have nt seen any young ones this year.
 
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