Larder audit

Otto68

Well-Known Member
Been advised that to supply a certain game dealer we will have to go through a game larder audit.
Anyone any idea what is involved,how strict they are, what kind of disinfectant we need to use, if a sink is required or just a tap & running water.

game dealer is highland game.

steve
 

Sampo

Well-Known Member
Worth reaching out to the auditor and asking for a checklist as to what's covered. This is usually the standard process and would give you a good idea as to what to expect/ prepared for. Also establishing the scope help focus on the relevant area.

As an auditor (not food related) some of the generic items I look for are record keeping, incident/ faults register, evidence of any maintanance carried out (preferably periodically), insurance, any deviation from the stated standards and notable issues. Some of these may not be applicable to this audit but hopefully provides a general idea.
 

lochty

Well-Known Member
From what I remember, they'll look for records. Larder temp, chiller service, clean working surfaces, clean knives, saws, hot and cold potable water and suitable cleaner. Make sure you have your large game cert and other paperwork as well.
 

tom

Well-Known Member
Morning, can anyone clarify the rule I
had not heard about the vet being present or meat inspector?
what level is this ?
thanks
 

BigPat

Well-Known Member
Never heard of a game larder audit? But it might just be a difference in terminology.
I set up my food business 2 years ago. All I do is supply venison in fur to game dealers (AGHE), supply venison skinned whole or into primal cuts to restaurants/pubs and whole skinned carcasses to butchers, plus a small amount to the public.

I don’t have a retail front, just a larder and chillers. When I set it up I went online and registered as a food busisness, contacted the local environmental health department and talked through the requirements and set up the larder accordingly. The basic physical requirements included hygienic wipe down walls and washable floors. 2 sinks, one for hands and one for utensil, both with fresh water hot and cold. clean and hygienic working surfaces, adequate light, food standard first aid kit, food safe cleaners and sanitisers. In terms of paperwork, I was required to have HACCP plan that covers all stages of the process including preparation to hunt, extracting carcasses, vehicles, refridgeration, chemicals used and delivery etc. Here is a link to HACCP


I would try to get an accurate view of what the audit involves as it gets expensive and time consuming if you need to go the whole hog!
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
you will need to show or agree with auditer where about on wild game guidance flow chart your coming in at ...... mine didnt have a clue and was adamant i had to be an AGHE, which i didnt.
main thing is HACCP to show critical control points of each step from cull to back to larder then form there chilling, to prep and cleaning etc.
record keeping, temp record, chiller and freezer temp records, cleaning fluids etc must be to BS / EN standard.
and then consideration to waste and disposal, planninf dept to see if any local regulations preventing you from doing this at your home address.
if in scotland then also a Venison Dealers Licence, and then also labelling of products use be dates/ allergens advice ...natasha law coming in october 2021.

Paul
 

tom

Well-Known Member
thanks Big pat ,
that's I what have done years ago but on a facebook group there was a whole thread started by Ben Heath saying you needed a meat inspector or vet ?
I think if you come under small producer can’t remember amount its still ok to not have a inspector ,
I did notice Mike Robison a while ago was getting carcasses stamped and inspected which I thought was strange ,
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
For disinfectant make sure it (a) meets BS EN 1276 and (b) is within it's use by date.

As well as BS EN 1276 most will also meet BS EN 13704 and BS EN 14476.

If it's an Environmental Health Officer inspection I found them very helpful. They recognised the difference between commercial and home-based premises, and inspected accordingly.
 

BigPat

Well-Known Member
Hi Tom,

unless there has been a change in the law that I’m not aware of, then there is no requirement for a vet on site unless your are slaughtering on site. My understanding that the main driver for a vet is to minimise the suffering of the animals prior to slaughter and identify any abnormal behaviour etc.
 

BigPat

Well-Known Member
For disinfectant make sure it (a) meets BS EN 1276 and (b) is within it's use by date.

As well as BS EN 1276 most will also meet BS EN 13704 and BS EN 14476.

If it's an Environmental Health Officer inspection I found them very helpful. They recognised the difference between commercial and home-based premises, and inspected accordingly.

I would echo this, I found the environmental health guys really helpful. They explained that processing raw meat is very low risk in the scheme of things and they are not looking for catch anyone out.....just keep everyone safe.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I've just had an EHO visit to check my larder over. She was really helpful, as it happens. Went out of her way to reassure us that she was here to help and advise if necessary, and put us right at ease. I actually really enjoyed her visit, especially as she was really interested in the entire process, from taking the shot, to hanging the carcass. Delighted to say I've been given the go ahead to start trading the moment my Venison Dealers License is approved :thumb:
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
I've just had an EHO visit to check my larder over. She was really helpful, as it happens. Went out of her way to reassure us that she was here to help and advise if necessary, and put us right at ease. I actually really enjoyed her visit, especially as she was really interested in the entire process, from taking the shot, to hanging the carcass. Delighted to say I've been given the go ahead to start trading the moment my Venison Dealers License is approved :thumb:

Excellent, well done :tiphat:
 
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