Last cast of the season for brown trout

caorach

Well-Known Member
I managed to get out on a wonderful autumn day for my last cast at the brown trout and, as I've been doing recently, I knocked together a little video. As with all my little videos if you expect shouting, loud music, big fish, posturing, and attempts to sell you something then you aren't going to find any of that. I had a fantastic day out, and a few small trout, and in the end that's what counts

 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
I'am glad of that maybe I won't be so upset looking out over a dull north sea , ;)
nice one I look forward to your vids :tiphat:
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
I'm glad you all liked it, and also that the more "laid back" approach has some appeal. As you might see I don't really do much actual fishing when I'm fishing as there is a lot of walking and tea and sitting about and that sort of stuff. Now I know that some people are keen to catch fish, and that is fine with me, but for me that can make it seem more like "hard work" than relaxation. Mostly if I catch something it is more an accident than a well planned event.

However, I also understand that this approach isn't for everyone and I'm lucky to get the chance to fish quite a bit, and to have access to almost endless good quality trout, sea trout and salmon but if I only had, say, a week per year then I might be a lot more keen to get out and catch something. So I can see that my bumbling about might appear a little less than sane to some people.

Over the last while I've been fishing quite a bit so hopefully I have the material to hack together a few more of these videos over the next few months. I've no grand plan for this other than that people who like "wild fishing" might enjoy it. As you might imagine there will be a lot of similarity between the videos as here in the Hebrides the format tends to be the same each day - walk for miles, reach the loch, fish, drink tea :)
 

TomT3

Well-Known Member
Beautiful scenery as always and good vid I’m so eager to return and sample the fishing. I’ll never forget the Hebrides-Harris is like another world compared to Essex!
 

Essexsussex

Well-Known Member
I have really enjoyed your vids. I have noticed that there is very little “tech talk” on them which frankly is good. I do however find myself keen to know things like are you fishing a dropper / bob fly, what sort of fly (I did get a glimpse of it once or twice!)
Thanks for sharing
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
I have really enjoyed your vids. I have noticed that there is very little “tech talk” on them which frankly is good. I do however find myself keen to know things like are you fishing a dropper / bob fly, what sort of fly (I did get a glimpse of it once or twice!)
Thanks for sharing
In the end I guess a lot of the "gear" is down to personal preference. For the most part when engaging in this sort of wild fishing stuff like boots and coats are probably more important than rods and reels and I'd guess that it is a very "non-technical" form of fishing in the sense that I just chuck the flies out and pull them back.

In general I fish two flies on the cast and I tend to go with the traditional wet flies. The particular biggest loch in that video seems to have fish that like bright coloured flies and so I think I was on a Goat's Toe and a Soldier Palmer, or something very similar, on the day. I'm also a fan of a Blue Zulu, Connemara Black, Black Pennell and the like. Usually I will be fishing something about a size 10 or 12. Apart from that there isn't much to tell.

I tend to like to fish longer rods, mostly because that was the way I was brought up in fishing, and so the rod is an 11 foot for a 7 weight. I also have some 11 foot rods for 4 weights and they are great sport, especially with sea trout, but I find that the lighter line is a real disadvantage in the wind and Lewis is said to be the most windy inhabited place on earth. The rod is a Leeda Volare IV and they are fantastic rods for about £60. I have custom rods on Sage blanks and so on but for general fishing it is the Leeda that comes out every time and I've had everything from Spring salmon through to the tiny brown trout you can see in the video on my Leeda - Spring salmon fishing with a trout rod is a whole lot of fun :)
 

geoshot

Well-Known Member
"I'm also a fan of a Blue Zulu, Connemara Black, Black Pennell and the like"

Add in a Bibio or any of the Kingsmill Moore patterns and you've just described a decent fly box for wildies on the lochans

Thanks Caorach, your little videos are very enjoyable, tight lines
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
"I'm also a fan of a Blue Zulu, Connemara Black, Black Pennell and the like"

Add in a Bibio or any of the Kingsmill Moore patterns and you've just described a decent fly box for wildies on the lochans

Thanks Caorach, your little videos are very enjoyable, tight lines
It is great that you enjoy them, I have some video of a few recent trips so hopefully I will get to publish a few more over the next few months.

I was very lucky to be taught my boat fishing by a chap, called Foncy McGovern, who fished with T.C. Kingsmill Moore but, sad to say, I hate boat fishing and will not get into a boat. However, in these days of very technical fishing it is interesting to reflect on what Foncy taught me - he basically had three casts with one for early, one for mid, and one for late season with three flies on each. He fished flies that would be considered huge these days, probably size 6 and 8 as a general rule and perhaps even bigger. What was most amusing was that Foncy fished what appeared to me to be bright green sea fishing nylon in about 50lb breaking strain, it would only just go through the eye of his flies. Despite all of this there was no one who could fish the lough like him and he caught a lot of fish, and a lot of very good fish, and in those days before catch and release I remember him distributing his catches around the village to those he thought might appreciate a good trout.

I would guess Foncy is dead 35+ years now but I'm told that, these days, to catch a fish on his lough you need tiny flies and very long fine fluorocarbon leaders. I often wonder if he were to come back would he be able to catch a fish, my guess is that he would continue to be the best angler on the lough.
 

gelert

Well-Known Member
What Lochs are these and are they far from your holiday cottage?
Absolutely love my wild loch fishing.
Nice vid btw
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
What Lochs are these and are they far from your holiday cottage?
Absolutely love my wild loch fishing.
Nice vid btw
Unfortunately my girlfriend has decided not to do the holiday rentals any more and so she finished up at that, really I've just kept the trade membership on to support the forum but I guess I should edit my signature etc. The advantage of this is that I've nothing to sell and so have no reason to "big anything up."

If you like wild loch fishing then there is no question that Lewis must be about the best destination in the UK, I can't think of anywhere that comes close. Some people say Lewis has as many as 2000 trout lochs, I don't think it is as many as that but a quick look at the satellite images in Google will demonstrate that it is more than you'll ever fish in a lifetime. So in one sense the precise lochs I was fishing don't really matter (I'll drop you a PM with the names) because you have almost infinite choice and also, as you can see, because these particular ones don't make fantastic fishing it just so happened that they were the lochs I fancied for a last day out at trout. Access to the trout lochs in terms of permission is easy as for the most part permission is "assumed" and so if you can walk to it then you can fish it but the real fun is in walking to remote lochs that haven't been fished in years. I would suggest that anglers who come to Lewis and then fish within sight of their car are missing out on 90% of the actual wild fishing experience - pretty much the equivalent of rattling the bucket, shooting the stag off the bonnet of the pick up, and claiming to have been hill stalking.

I fished the same group of lochs in June and made another video:


It looks a bit different in June as the wind was in a different direction and so I was mostly on the opposite banks plus I didn't wander out to the wee bog hole for a cast and so only fished 3 lochs.
 

geoshot

Well-Known Member
It is great that you enjoy them, I have some video of a few recent trips so hopefully I will get to publish a few more over the next few months.

I was very lucky to be taught my boat fishing by a chap, called Foncy McGovern, who fished with T.C. Kingsmill Moore but, sad to say, I hate boat fishing and will not get into a boat. However, in these days of very technical fishing it is interesting to reflect on what Foncy taught me - he basically had three casts with one for early, one for mid, and one for late season with three flies on each. He fished flies that would be considered huge these days, probably size 6 and 8 as a general rule and perhaps even bigger. What was most amusing was that Foncy fished what appeared to me to be bright green sea fishing nylon in about 50lb breaking strain, it would only just go through the eye of his flies. Despite all of this there was no one who could fish the lough like him and he caught a lot of fish, and a lot of very good fish, and in those days before catch and release I remember him distributing his catches around the village to those he thought might appreciate a good trout.

I would guess Foncy is dead 35+ years now but I'm told that, these days, to catch a fish on his lough you need tiny flies and very long fine fluorocarbon leaders. I often wonder if he were to come back would he be able to catch a fish, my guess is that he would continue to be the best angler on the lough.
Hahaha, that anecdote reminded me of a late friend of mine, John Rowan, he was a leading light in our local river angling club. All of his flies looked the same, feckin awful things they were, untidy monstrosities of seal fur and the cheapest hackles he could find, even stray feathers from old pillows were pressed into action. All of his flies looked the same, nymphs, wets & dries, they were all bunches of stray fibres on a hook and fugly, utterly totally fugly. However, I used to joke that he could catch fish in a blocked toilet. Whether it was luck, skill or persistence - he caught fish. The best bit though was that his wife, Clare, was by far a better fly-fisher than him, she could out-fish anyone on a dry fly. I loved winding him up about that :)
He couldn't hit a goose or a duck sitting three feet from him, we used to shoot together, and of course he got a severe ribbing about that too.
Happy memories
Thanks for bringing them back and good luck
 

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