Laws Covering Baiting?

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
I'm currently researching material for a magazine article I'm writing which concerns the legalities of putting out bait for foxes, but I've not yet found anything written which covers it. I've talked to the ever-helpful guys at BASC, but they weren't aware of anything either. I'm hoping to speak to the NFU chap this evening, but in the meantime I was wondering if anyone here might be able to point me towards anything that might assist me?
 

mealiejimmy

Well-Known Member
OK,
This is not a legal opinion, but my understanding is that a wild animal can be legally used as bait
e.g rabbit, deer, geese, pheasant etc, but that farmed animals such a sheep and cattle cannot.
Other stuff like canned food and fish are legal to use.
I wish you well with your research and if you come up with some definitve answers, then please share them with us.
I, and I imagine many other people who shoot foxes over baits would like to know the exact legal situation.

Cheers

Bruce
 
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novice

Well-Known Member
Have you looked at the gwct or similar guidance on the use of middens? A popular approach to snaring and I'm sure there's a specific piece on to in their literature.

Novice
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
Thank you, Gentlemen - that is most appreciated!

Novice - I've not been able to find anything relevant on the GWCT website, but would be glad of any pointers if I've missed them.

Charlie - thanks for the link, it covers much of what I was hoping for, but there are still a few grey areas that I'd like covered off!
 

novice

Well-Known Member
A quick Google of "gwct middens" brings a link direct to their specific midden fact sheet. Sorry can't post link as on phone.

Makes reference to animal by product regulations as reason for only being able to use material from wild animals.

I'm sure if you gave them a call they'd be able to add to that.

Novice
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
A quick Google of "gwct middens" brings a link direct to their specific midden fact sheet. Sorry can't post link as on phone.

Makes reference to animal by product regulations as reason for only being able to use material from wild animals.

I'm sure if you gave them a call they'd be able to add to that.

Novice
Many thanks! :)
 

re'M'ington

Well-Known Member
Are you looking into this for any specific reason Paddy? Has someone said something to you that makes you believe that it may have some illegal aspects to the practice?

Martin
 

mealiejimmy

Well-Known Member
Are you looking into this for any specific reason Paddy? Has someone said something to you that makes you believe that it may have some illegal aspects to the practice?

Martin
To find the answer to your question you could try reading the OPs first post.

Cheers

Bruce
 

tarponhead

Well-Known Member
Have a look at You Tube fieldsports britain and shooting show foxing films - I'm sure I remember seeing foxers using dead lambs/sheep staked as bait, which would be legal as long as the carcass is eventually disposed of as per the guidance.
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
Have a look at You Tube fieldsports britain and shooting show foxing films - I'm sure I remember seeing foxers using dead lambs/sheep staked as bait, which would be legal as long as the carcass is eventually disposed of as per the guidance.
Thanks - that's exactly the sort of thing I'm seeking clarity on!
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
I read the first post and maybe I should of wrote my question a bit differently,so here goes......Why rock the boat?????

Martin
That's a strange thing to say? I have no intention of rocking the boat - I, like many other foxers I've spoken to, would like to know exactly where the lines are drawn. One member on here for instance, was the subject of unwanted and erroneous attention from the RSPCA, specifically because even they did not understand what was legal and what wasn't.
 

CharlieT

Well-Known Member
As said previously, using fallen stock is prohibited and could and indeed would lay the farm open to prosecution. There is a very strong probability that such a prosecution would also result in SFP penalties.

The law on fallen stock is covered by this legislation http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2011/881/pdfs/uksi_20110881_en.pdf

Occasionally I happen to find one of my ewes dead under a hedge whilst out lamping and am able to shoot a fox scavenging on it but I make a mental note to remove it to a suitable place for collection asap.
However, if I found a "foxer" putting out deadstock as bait and thus leaving me open to all the hassle and the possibility of prosecution I'd not be too impressed.

Simple answer is baiting itself is not illegal and therefore there is no legislation to point you towards. However, the use of fallen stock for bait is not an exempt use (of fallen stock) under the legislation I quoted above, therefore its use is illegal.
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
As said previously, using fallen stock is prohibited and could and indeed would lay the farm open to prosecution. There is a very strong probability that such a prosecution would also result in SFP penalties.

The law on fallen stock is covered by this legislation http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2011/881/pdfs/uksi_20110881_en.pdf

Occasionally I happen to find one of my ewes dead under a hedge whilst out lamping and am able to shoot a fox scavenging on it but I make a mental note to remove it to a suitable place for collection asap.
However, if I found a "foxer" putting out deadstock as bait and thus leaving me open to all the hassle and the possibility of prosecution I'd not be too impressed.

Simple answer is baiting itself is not illegal and therefore there is no legislation to point you towards. However, the use of fallen stock for bait is not an exempt use (of fallen stock) under the legislation I quoted above, therefore its use is illegal.
Thanks for the helpful link - it's much appreciated!
 

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