Leaving cases primed ready to load later

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timbeech

Well-Known Member
Probably a stupid question but is there any problem priming cases and leaving them to be loaded at a much later date. I've got a 100 cases but just about to develop my loads, I want to prep all the cases (size, trim, prime) and leave them ready to fill as and when.

I'm guessing there isn't a problem with this as the primers aren't exactly packaged to protect them from the elements when you buy them.
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
Tim
It seems an odd thing to do to me. What will you do if you ever decide to change primers? Or to do some further brass prep?
Regards JCS
 

timbeech

Well-Known Member
Tim
It seems an odd thing to do to me. What will you do if you ever decide to change primers? Or to do some further brass prep?
Regards JCS

Not intending to change primers (sticking with CCI's), anyway for hunting I can't see the primers making a lot of difference, I'm not shooting F-class.

What further brass prep will I need to do, they'll already be cleaned, sized and trimmed.
 

charadam

Well-Known Member
Not saying you need to do, but you might decide to do (and not necessarily in this order): primer pocket uniforming, flash hole uniforming, case neck turning, neck sizing, case mouth flaring, case mouth deburring, annealing, blah, blah, blah.

Or you could just go ahead as you are and forget the .01" group reduction.

Now, I do all the above stuff including the blah blahs - because I like to.

Over to you.
 

csl

Administrator
Site Staff
Can't see a problem so long as you label them up clearly in case you do anything funky with primers (eg if you use different primers, especially standard and magnum) for different loads as pressures can vary substantially.
 

jonny.c

Well-Known Member
If i have cases primed that have been stored i always use a light and check inside the cases or cases which have been sorted by weight takes 2seconds to double check & A SPLIT SECOND FOR IT ALL TO GO WRONG:doh:
 

jcampbellsmith

Well-Known Member
Hmmm... It all sounds a bit odd to me and contrary to what you would expect to find in a modern manufacturing process. Generally, folk leave the assembly of components to the last minute (Just in Time) and then assemble what they need. Secondly, the primers come nicely packaged and will quite happily sit in their original packaging for years. Thirdly, in my opinion, a primed case should be locked up.
Regards JCS
 

bobjs

Well-Known Member
I used to do all my brass this way, if i did not have the time to do a full reload on the same day/at that time etc.


1, deprime and neck/full size

then the next time in the loading room,

2, clean the brass in a tumbler .........now a ultrasonic one, so dry them in a warm oven.

then the next step when i had time.

3, inspect all the brass.flash hole. primer pocket yada yada.

then

4, carry out the case prep as per your likes or go totally ott.

at this point i would do the primed case job and lock away in the safe. clearly marked with a small label as to the primer make etc, and the date/quantity done.


or complete the task until all fully loaded,

final task,

log in my reloading book the ammo amount/makes of all components/powder make/weight/make of brass/bullet weight etc etc.

no harm in locating the primer and coming back to it later (i also stored them with the open end of the case facing down and in a cal specific MTM box etc.)

we all have our own ways of doing things, as long as its safe and legal....................get on with it and have some fun. :)

bob.
 

timbeech

Well-Known Member
I used to do all my brass this way, if i did not have the time to do a full reload on the same day/at that time etc.


1, deprime and neck/full size

then the next time in the loading room,

2, clean the brass in a tumbler .........now a ultrasonic one, so dry them in a warm oven.

then the next step when i had time.

3, inspect all the brass.flash hole. primer pocket yada yada.

then

4, carry out the case prep as per your likes or go totally ott.

at this point i would do the primed case job and lock away in the safe. clearly marked with a small label as to the primer make etc, and the date/quantity done.


or complete the task until all fully loaded,

final task,

log in my reloading book the ammo amount/makes of all components/powder make/weight/make of brass/bullet weight etc etc.

no harm in locating the primer and coming back to it later (i also stored them with the open end of the case facing down and in a cal specific MTM box etc.)

we all have our own ways of doing things, as long as its safe and legal....................get on with it and have some fun. :)

bob.

This is exactly my plan, do a bit each night. I get a couple of hours of peace and quite to myself each night when the little one goes to bed and my wife goes out to sort her horse. I have enough time to complete one task properly and thoroughly, but without racing to get it all complete in one sitting.

My primed cases (and loaded ammo) will be sorted in RCBS ammo boxes, clearly labelled and locked in the safe with everything else.
 

mereside

Well-Known Member
I do mine like this so everything is ready to go for filling with powder and bullet seating for me its easy as the 300 win and 270 i use the same powder and primers so i dont have any changes to make i do all my 270 stuff over a few nights and move onto the 300.
I wouldn't be doing this to leave a long period just to get certain stages done so i can sit back relax. everything is in doors and in one room i just shut the door and lock after use, atb wayne
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
i do this
primarily as I tend to do my reloading for known loads all at once and make lots or do lots of brass prep all at once

I have had clean sized brass mixed up with clean non sized brass! Pain in the proverbial to go through resizing all over

now I do all the brass through each stage so there is no mix up with brass at different firings or stages of prep
this includes priming,
prepped and primed cases are stored in clean and sealed boxes, (locked away obviously...)

​no issues from what I can see.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I don't see any harm in it provided you are keeping them away from moisture/humidity. I have bought heaps of factory primed brass in my day so that probably isn't much of an issue either. That said, I store my primers water proof ammo cans and generally don't prime until I'm ready to load. Just a habit.~Muir
 
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