lee perfect powder measure vs lee safety scale

CDSG Shooting Sports

Offroad Gary

Well-Known Member
weighed/measured some powder last night for the first time.

calibrated the scale to zero first, did the calc on the mass/volume of powder and set the measure.

set the scale to the amount desired (37 gn)

the quantity delivered was quite a bit lower than what i was expecting, didnt actually weigh it but it didnt balance the scale.

tweaked it up a couple of notches to get the correct amount according to the scales (even if recalced at this measurment off the measure, still under maximum value, calcs back to 39gn) so i presume i'm still within safe limits?? :confused:

i presume the safety scale is much more reliable than the powder measure?
 

User00004

Distinguished Member
I binned the Lee Perfect Powder Measure. :cry:

First use, I set it up, charged a handful of cases, I then out of curiosity tested every 2nd load to check consistancy, it fluctuated. Wasn't happy :cry: with that so I then weighed every load, all were different. :cry: :cry:

By luck, I then discovered why, :) the pivot on it, had been damaged (not visable) some how, my powder was coming through the outer case where it pivots (black plastic bit about the size of a 2p) of the Perfect powder measure.

I now measure every load electronically. Will pick up a Lee Powder Dipper set at the CLA though, meant to be a "Gift" to use, I will then check consistance again with those, hopefully it will be OK :)
 

Offroad Gary

Well-Known Member
i weighed all 5 loads after getting it set, all were same.

just the scale reading is not aligned with what it delivers, or the powder mass/volume factor is not correct??, i suppose its a bit like having the temp written on your central heating stat, your house is not actually going to be at that temp, its just a scale to read up and down against.
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
Ignore calculations to set the powder measure, do it the way you have and when you get it at the right setting, ie correct weight, then use your calipers to measure the length of the adjuster, make a note of this and you have a record for future reference. That of course will only apply to that powder, different powder will be a different measurement. Lots of records to keep :D

TJ I use the Lee dippers, much easier and more convenient to use.

John
 

swampy

Well-Known Member
powder wieghts

I use both methods, the scales and the perfect powder measure. i drop the powder into the scales dish and adjust until i get it right. once the measure is right i check every 10 loads and i have found it very accurate. i don't use the calibration thing on the screw in plunger. i just adjust until it throws it right.

swampy
 

Richard Parsons

Well-Known Member
Agree with most of above. Personally I weigh all powder on the Lee scales, as previous checks show irritating fluctuations with the powder measure. Also make sure you check the scale is calibrated perfectly before each loading session. I did not once and had to start all over again as all rounds were coming up very light......grrrrrr
 
I had both, Measure and Scales. Took me about an hour to get the right ammont of powder. But it fluctuated qiuet a bit and scales didn't seem too clever either. Sent them both back and am now looking for a set of RCBS 505 scales. The dealer I bought them off has lent me a set and they are a lot easier to read.
Ian.
 

Offroad Gary

Well-Known Member
my that was a long time ago!! now use redding br30 powder thrower and digital scales. once load is sorted the br30 just dials in every time, use it for h380, h4895 and blc2. it chops the h4895 nicely.
 

callie

Well-Known Member
had to run 3 hopperfuls of h322 through lee powder thrower to stop static, even then there were slight variences when checking against scales, 22gr=1.6vmd. found out that if you tap disc on side of filling lever when thrower is in the fill position and again when emptying into case that there is very little difference when checking against scales.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
I am amazed at the reliance on the VMD in earlier posts. This is just a guide line. Different lots and densities will change weight. Tossing a measure because it tosses charges of "different" weights is silly. They will always be different. Callie has the method down. Many hopper style measures have a weighted "knocker" you pick up and drop against the side of the housing to perform that same task you do with a tap.

It it this inaccuracy in measures that dictates the rule that you never throw maximum, or near maximum, charges straight from the hopper.~Muir
 

callie

Well-Known Member
It can be sad some of the things you do when you're retired, I've made a wall hung cabinet to house my reloading gear, one of the features is a drop down door supported by rigid swivel wires, my lee scales lives in this part of the cabinet and when in use I pull the scales forward onto the door so that when I'm sat at the bench the scales are at eye level, sad part, this morning I calibrated the scales 1/10gr+ and 1/10gr- and marked the scales with a fine permnament marking pen, these marks are 3/16" above and below the main calibration mark so that when weighing powder the scales show plus or minus 3/32"(2.5mm) the weights will never be more than 1/10gr out, for the shooting I do thats plenty good enough, now the really sad part, the powder I'm using at present is h322, cut granules, I weighed 1/10gr and "counted" the granules, there were approximately 35, now how sad is that !!! what I'm really trying to say to anyone who's just bought lee scales if they're not bang on the calibration mark don't think that they're rubbish, richard lee guarantees them, and like I said, 3/32"+ or 3/32"- is approx 1/2 of 1/10gr, or 0.05gr.
 

204 Ruger

Well-Known Member
It can be sad some of the things you do when you're retired, I've made a wall hung cabinet to house my reloading gear, one of the features is a drop down door supported by rigid swivel wires, my lee scales lives in this part of the cabinet and when in use I pull the scales forward onto the door so that when I'm sat at the bench the scales are at eye level, sad part, this morning I calibrated the scales 1/10gr+ and 1/10gr- and marked the scales with a fine permnament marking pen, these marks are 3/16" above and below the main calibration mark so that when weighing powder the scales show plus or minus 3/32"(2.5mm) the weights will never be more than 1/10gr out, for the shooting I do thats plenty good enough, now the really sad part, the powder I'm using at present is h322, cut granules, I weighed 1/10gr and "counted" the granules, there were approximately 35, now how sad is that !!! what I'm really trying to say to anyone who's just bought lee scales if they're not bang on the calibration mark don't think that they're rubbish, richard lee guarantees them, and like I said, 3/32"+ or 3/32"- is approx 1/2 of 1/10gr, or 0.05gr.

Not sad at all, I'm not retired but have done similar things in my quest for accuracy. The lee powder measure I have does vary loads and when looking at the scale it seems a lot but actually just like you said its only 2 or 3 granules out. I tend to measure 1 in 2 and I'm getting some great consistent groups.
 

Dawnraider

Well-Known Member
It can be sad some of the things you do when you're retired, I've made a wall hung cabinet to house my reloading gear, one of the features is a drop down door supported by rigid swivel wires, my lee scales lives in this part of the cabinet and when in use I pull the scales forward onto the door so that when I'm sat at the bench the scales are at eye level, sad part, this morning I calibrated the scales 1/10gr+ and 1/10gr- and marked the scales with a fine permnament marking pen, these marks are 3/16" above and below the main calibration mark so that when weighing powder the scales show plus or minus 3/32"(2.5mm) the weights will never be more than 1/10gr out, for the shooting I do thats plenty good enough, now the really sad part, the powder I'm using at present is h322, cut granules, I weighed 1/10gr and "counted" the granules, there were approximately 35, now how sad is that !!! what I'm really trying to say to anyone who's just bought lee scales if they're not bang on the calibration mark don't think that they're rubbish, richard lee guarantees them, and like I said, 3/32"+ or 3/32"- is approx 1/2 of 1/10gr, or 0.05gr.
It may be just a little bit sad but at least youv'e saved the rest of us from having to count them.;)
 

longlowdog

Well-Known Member
To satisfy my curiosity about how much/little you have to spend to get the best accuracy I ran up a load of 50 6.5-284 loads using just the cheap Lee powder chucker. When I check weighed them sure there was a degree of variation, however, they still put 10 shots into 0.4 inch from my Roedale rifle. I think that quality prepared brass, concentric loads and a reasonable tube to stuff them up are actually more important than measuring powder to the N'th degree. Those who shoot out past 600 yds may disagree, but out to 300yds the cheep and cheerfull Lee has taken hours out of my reloading time.
Next job is to get a £25 set of lee dies and see how they stack up against my current bushing dies.
 

Harry mac

Well-Known Member
had to run 3 hopperfuls of h322 through lee powder thrower to stop static, even then there were slight variences when checking against scales, 22gr=1.6vmd. found out that if you tap disc on side of filling lever when thrower is in the fill position and again when emptying into case that there is very little difference when checking against scales.

I use a very similar method with my Lee Perfect measure. Lift lever to fill position. Tap pivot screw three times with finger to settle powder column in measuring chamber. Throw charge into scale pan or case, then tap pivot screw three times again to dis-lodge any powder kernels which may be sticking. Using this method usually gets me consistency of about 0.2grn. I've certainly no plans to spend any more money on a powder measure unless I break this one, and then it will probably be another Lee Perfect.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
The reason is that exact weight is of little importance. It's an argument that we've had here many times so I won't get into it but you, my friend, have it the nail exactly on the head. There are far more important things to worry about than a tenth of a grain. Anyone who says otherwise hasn't reloaded enough. Bench rest shooters measure by volume with the natural variances that occur with a mechanical measure... even the best will vary. BR shooters don't worry about it. They spend their energies on other facets of the reloading chain; especially those you pointed out.~Muir
 

stag1933

Well-Known Member
All this chatter about an extra 170fps or a tenth of a grain in a charge is a load of bunkum.
I have spent many, many years shooting, scoring and invigilating at stalkers shoots and find that the vast majority of competitors are incapable of putting 3 shots in an inch bullseye at 100 yards even off a good rest. At a recent stalkers shoot with 24 entrants only 2 scored 30/30 and 2 with even 29/30 at 100yds on an inch bullseye. I am a geriatric, 77 year old partially sighted old fart with my driving licence revoked by DVLA yet I had one of the 30s.
Many people are incapable of a standard of marksmanship to rationally evaluate any situation regarding their rifles or loads.

HWH.
 
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