Left hand instructor

hedge hunter

Well-Known Member
How about teaching a leftie too shoot right handed.yes I want too learn too shoot right handed.im truly ambidextrus but when it comes too shooting my brain favours the left.i can shoot half decent from the right shoulder but it just doesn't feel right.would it be hard too train myself too change
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Question can a left handed shooting instructor teach a right handed shooter this is shotgun not rifle
You swing both ways....left lead is the same as right lead, left gun mount is the same as right mount.

The only difference is feet with a LH is the front right foot will be leading....but as a shooter you would know that?

One thing I noticed is most local clay shoots are set up by RH people so the cages can be a bit odd for a LH gun

As a LH dive instructor teaching RH people had one draw back....they were RH lol....
 
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Marcher

Well-Known Member
Way back in the 70's when I did the CPSA course for instructors, which lasted a whole week, all the right handers were made to shoot left handed, just to show you how difficult it was for beginners. Also, if a right handed coach demonstrates gun mount to a right handed client, he will turn his back on him, which isn't very helpful. We did all the coaching from the right hand side of a right handed client, as if we were left handed, so they could see. We became pretty much ambidextrous in a week.
 

Triggermortis

Well-Known Member
How about teaching a leftie too shoot right handed.yes I want too learn too shoot right handed.im truly ambidextrus but when it comes too shooting my brain favours the left.i can shoot half decent from the right shoulder but it just doesn't feel right.would it be hard too train myself too change
A very good friend of mine is right handed, because of an eye problem he taught himself to shoot left handed with a right handed gun,he went on to become the Kent vet’s DTL champ several years in a row, sadly now though he has given up due to illness
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Way back in the 70's when I did the CPSA course for instructors, which lasted a whole week, all the right handers were made to shoot left handed, just to show you how difficult it was for beginners. Also, if a right handed coach demonstrates gun mount to a right handed client, he will turn his back on him, which isn't very helpful. We did all the coaching from the right hand side of a right handed client, as if we were left handed, so they could see. We became pretty much ambidextrous in a week.

All you have to do is put the student at a different angle!....it is not difficult for a person who is L or R handed as that is something they have been way before they pick up a gun...writing drinking a cup of tea...fork in the left hand...
driving....sport.
Most sport diving regulators come over the right shoulder, people learn very very very quickly where that it...

I shoot left cast shotguns and right hand bolt rifles....my Dad knew I was left handed way before he gave me a .177 BSA to plink with :tiphat:

I hope the 70's teaching format has caught up some what...?
 

hedge hunter

Well-Known Member
Wot about eye dominance I have a very strong left eye .maybe it's why I shoot the way I do.i write with my right hand.use a fork ect.it may not be too difficult too learn too shoot of the right shoulder
 

Sakoodin1

Well-Known Member
Wot about eye dominance I have a very strong left eye .maybe it's why I shoot the way I do.i write with my right hand.use a fork ect.it may not be too difficult too learn too shoot of the right shoulder
If your left eye dominant but right handed just close your left eye! or put a small patch on the left lense of your glasses 👍
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Any decent instructor should first look at eye dominance and then handidness. In many ways with a shotgun, and certainly in the more traditional game / side by side style is it the forehand that actually does the aiming pointing etc. All the the trigger hand needs do is to lift the butt to the shoulder and pull trigger.

Shooting is all about balance, muscle memory and timing and that just takes time and repetition. A good coach helps develop a good style and technique - the rest is down to time.

One thing though is to think about the type of shooting you want to do and the style of shooting.

There are two principle styles:

Game - a more instinctive style starting behind target, swing through and fire as butt hits the shoulder. It makes you very good at snap shooting birds on different angles, jinking etc. And you tend to shoot a lighter gun, straight grip etc. Beautiful to watch, very natural, but relies on instinctive timing. And when your timing is off, it can be difficult to reset. I shoot this way and if it’s going wrong and try to hard it just gets worse. It’s a no think style that is good in the field, especially on that fast jinking pack of teal that cone through at first light. If you think you miss. It’s no good though on that high bird you can watch for ages - i look away until its about over me and then shoot it

Target / Clay style - taught by many shooting schools, especially those who are focused on Olympic style trap, skeet, Fitasc etc. It is a much more deliberate style of running the gun on a groove and squeezing at a predetermined kill point. Your trigger hand is much more in control and you take a much more deliberate sight picture. Guns are heavier, more target style grips etc etc. It is a much more deliberate style that works very well on clays - which of course fly on a known trajectory - and on high birds that you see from a long way off. Not so good on that pack of teal junking over your hole in which you are hiding on the marsh at first light.

The comparable in rifle shooting is the range shooter who can keep tiny little groups at long range, but can he can shoot a buck off hand that steps out at 30 yards and pauses for a moment, or the gamekeeper wh can instinctively hit a fox at 200 when it stops to the squeek, but struggles on a DSC1 test.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
An instructor once told me that the correct way to teach a right-handed shooter is the demonstrate holding the gun left-handed.
 
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