leg injure in roe buck

supersport

Well-Known Member
#1
was out stalking last week stalk in to a yearling buck that look lame so decided to cull the animal. turns out a good call it had a leg injure so would not have survive this winter.looks like was broken for a long time see how the fur has grown in to the brake and the bone has enlarged. by the way i do hold a out of season licence so animal welfare comes first just thought id share this with you all.
 

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Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#6
I don't think even the most bloody-minded of people would disagree that shooting that buck was anything but the right thing to do :thumb:
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
#7
Good call mate. Last year I shot a Fallow buck. It was moving a bit strange and when I went to pick it up I noticed one hind leg was missing from the hock down. The wound had healed perfectly and the animal was of good wieght. I think it lost the leg in an encounter with wire.
Tusker
 

Wingy

Well-Known Member
#8
Good call mate. Last year I shot a Fallow buck. It was moving a bit strange and when I went to pick it up I noticed one hind leg was missing from the hock down. The wound had healed perfectly and the animal was of good wieght. I think it lost the leg in an encounter with wire.
Tusker
Did exactly the same with a roe buck in April rear leg from the hock down was missing but it had healed over like a dogs docked tail. Other than a limp it was in good health.
Wingy
 

Harry mac

Well-Known Member
#9
It may have been a good call to stop it suffering in the short term, but we see evidence time and time again that wounds such as this are highly survivable. When I stalked on STANTA 3 legged deer were often seen, which I put down to the amount of wire and string that inevitably gets left on a military training area.
Personally, if the only ill effects it was showing was a limp, I'd not have culled it out of season, unless the constriction was still attached, such as a fox snare or length of baling twine hanging off the leg.
 

supersport

Well-Known Member
#10
It may have been a good call to stop it suffering in the short term, but we see evidence time and time again that wounds such as this are highly survivable. When I stalked on STANTA 3 legged deer were often seen, which I put down to the amount of wire and string that inevitably gets left on a military training area.
Personally, if the only ill effects it was showing was a limp, I'd not have culled it out of season, unless the constriction was still attached, such as a fox snare or length of baling twine hanging off the leg.
interesting thought harry mac im incline to agree with what you say and yes the animaul did appear in good helth and had a good body weight.but in saying that i think i did the rite thing still i would say that wouldn't i.
 

night stalker

Well-Known Member
#11
I'm in a similar position and wonder where I stand legally. A mate just asked me to go to his permission to help cull a buck that has been hit by a car on the main road that splits his permission in half. It has a badly damaged back leg with a large lump and only one antler. It was in poor condition when he saw it but he couldn't get a safe shot due to the road.

Cheers

Rick
 
#12
I think you made the right decision,but it's something you need assess in each individual case, what's the prognosis, has the wound healed? is the animal suffering at this moment ? Will it suffer long term? Many deer recover from broken bones and amputations, deer do quite well on three legs.

I have even shot a Red hind that had lost both front feet at some point , had completely healed and she was walking on the stumps, apart from the obvious of having two feet missing she was in perfect health.

As I said something you need to decide when the situation arises,there is no one size fits all, just walking with a limp is not enough reason to shoot out of season.
 
#13
I'm in a similar position and wonder where I stand legally. A mate just asked me to go to his permission to help cull a buck that has been hit by a car on the main road that splits his permission in half. It has a badly damaged back leg with a large lump and only one antler. It was in poor condition when he saw it but he couldn't get a safe shot due to the road.

Cheers

Rick
Defence in law if you can prove you culled it to prevent further suffering.
 
#14
It's a tough one. In this case most likely a good job as the buck might have had infections or other complications arise due to not being able to use that leg, be it an infection on the 'other' knee from having to use one leg to get up on or to lean on when grazing - I have seen this situation numerous times, and whilst the animal appears in reasonable good health at the time, it might only be a matter of days or weeks until the 'good leg' takes a beating from having to be the only supporting function, at which point the animal will suffer.

As deer managers I think we have to put the 'law'/rule book aside now and again and think about the animals welfare firstly, well, safety coming first of course. If I lost my license for shooting out of season on a beast that I felt was suffering but the police went against my judgement, I would rest happily without my FAC knowing I had done a good deed...bummed yes but the view from the moral high ground is bloody good.
 

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