List of powders by calibre

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
Now - I know this is bound to be the subject of much debate - and there is a significant amount of grey in the area, but I am looking to compile a list of powders commonly used - and available - for calibres to help give a guide.
Before I go ahead and seek to create one, has anyone seen something?

For example - for 270W, common powders are N160, RL22 and H4831. There are of course others like RS70 and yes RL19 can be used as well as N170 - but I'm after broad brush that is simple to interpret. Key word is also available.

This is not about burn rate charts - we know we can get those and they are then useful for comparing powders across brands.

Anyone seen one please?
 

Steff

Well-Known Member
Here is a listing of the commonly available powders with a description and examplary calibre applications. Even though the page is also available in English it doesn't contain the prose I just mentioned.
Work your way through it and bring it into a list form. Have fun.

Treibladungspulver
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
Many thanks for the responses so far. I think it highlights that what I was trying to achieve isn't simply available just now.
The UK is in a different position from the US, especially with REACH compliance etc. and the reloading maneuls (sic) are too complicated for quick reference.
 

Eric the Red

Well-Known Member
Not really,

Most manufacturers like Viht, RS and ADI (the Aussie Varget maker) helpfully number their powders to signify burn rate, lower number, faster powder.
Thanks for your opinion. I'm not stupid and I have raised the thread because that solution is not appropriate for the specific issue at hand. I just want to make simple info simply available.
Clearly I need to invest the time to do that and so I shall.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Now - I know this is bound to be the subject of much debate - and there is a significant amount of grey in the area, but I am looking to compile a list of powders commonly used - and available - for calibres to help give a guide.
Before I go ahead and seek to create one, has anyone seen something?

For example - for 270W, common powders are N160, RL22 and H4831. There are of course others like RS70 and yes RL19 can be used as well as N170 - but I'm after broad brush that is simple to interpret. Key word is also available.

This is not about burn rate charts - we know we can get those and they are then useful for comparing powders across brands.

Anyone seen one please?
You mean draw together into one single reference chart all the information already supplied in the individual powder company suitability tables?

Reload Swiss, Lovex and Vectan have such information in their reloader manuals, so does Vihtavuori sort of. The Vihtavuori chart if you can call it that simply gives examples of use and comparisons with some powders from other manufacturers.

That's quite a task you're setting yourself Eric but I'm sure that it would be much appreciated by reloaders if you can achieve it.
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
That's quite a task you're setting yourself Eric but I'm sure that it would be much appreciated by reloaders if you can achieve it.

It's not just 'quite a task', but actually an impossible one in practical terms as it takes no account of bullet weight and/or chamber configuration. 30-cal cartridges can utilise 110gn to over 230gn bullets; the little 223 Rem 35gn to 95gn bullets, and so on. The powder requirements change according to bullet weights in any cartridge, so you would then have to have two, three, sometimes even four bands for each cartridge.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
Good point Laurie but isn't that why the powder companies that actually produce suitability charts list a range of suitable powders and not just a single powder. The charts that I am thinking of and have immediate access to generally show comments something like most suitable, useable and not suitable so they take this into consideration.
 

Daddy The Skunk

Well-Known Member
No. Reloading manuals do that for you.
You are right. Availability is the end game: If your manual lists powders X,Y, & Z but your dealer only carries powder "X", that's the powder you are most likey going to load. ~Muir
You said about what I was thinking.:tiphat:
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Good point Laurie but isn't that why the powder companies that actually produce suitability charts list a range of suitable powders and not just a single powder. The charts that I am thinking of and have immediate access to generally show comments something like most suitable, useable and not suitable so they take this into consideration.

I think @Muir provided an example once of using IMR 4895 to load 45-70, it was a charge rate which would have detonated a 30-06 case but was fine in the big straight wall...
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
Good point Laurie but isn't that why the powder companies that actually produce suitability charts list a range of suitable powders and not just a single powder. The charts that I am thinking of and have immediate access to generally show comments something like most suitable, useable and not suitable so they take this into consideration.

I've rarely found such charts of any use. Likewise, lists that say primary use / secondary use and suchlike for 'Medium cartridges', 'Small cartridges' etc. The range of cartridges, calibres, and bullet weights / types is now so great as to make such generalisations pretty useless. (Anyway, what's a 'Small cartridge'? 375 H&H Magnum and other very large African DG cartridges use the same powders as 308 Win which in turn shares them with 223 Rem with mid-weight bullets - that pretty well covers archetypal large / medium / small numbers.)

The case capacity to bore area ratio plus bullet weight determine broad powder requirements, but then even there some combinations work much better for one powder within a group than others that are apparently similar.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
"Suitability" also has to do with effeciency. A powder which may work fine in a given case, but not be optimal, might be excluded from a particular "suitability" chart.
And that changes. Hodgdon's "Lil Gun" was originally a .410 shotgun powder but in time it became known for other uses. ~Muir
 

Northman_

Well-Known Member
Hmm....
Using just one powder for all my cartridges would be great...

Anything that functions great with?
222: 40-50 grain
223: 60-70 grain
6,5x55: 120-140 grain
308: 130-150 grain
30-06: 165-180 grain
 

Rory

Well-Known Member
Hmm....
Using just one powder for all my cartridges would be great...

Anything that functions great with?
222: 40-50 grain
223: 60-70 grain
6,5x55: 120-140 grain
308: 130-150 grain
30-06: 165-180 grain
Vhitavouri N140 for all but the .222, Vhit N130 looks good for that (and lighter .223 bullets).
 

NoIDeer

Well-Known Member
Quickload will give you a pretty comprehensive list of comparison powders for a specific load you have entered.
 
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