liver fluke, possible dangers?

scubadog

Well-Known Member
So after shooting my first fallow I did the gralloch as expected.
We noted that the live showed a possible sign of fluke. As it was dark I bagged it up for closer examination at home.
On closer inspection I dissected it and found it had a small infection of liver fluke.
I have discarded the liver.
My question is that I would like to give the dog the raw bones of the deer to my dog. Also it has been suggested that the tongue can also be fed to the dog. Is this safe?
Also is it safe for humans to eat the rest of the offal?
Thanks
 
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Apache

Well-Known Member
Liver fluke require an intermediate stage via a mud snail. You could swallow a live fluke and it would do you no harm.

People can pick up the infective stage - eg by picking wild watercress.
 

basil

Distinguished Member
So after shooting my first fallow I did the gralloch as expected.
We noted that the live showed a possible sign of fluke. As it was dark I bagged it up for closer examination at home.
On closer inspection I dissected it and found it had a small infection of liver fluke.
I have discarded the liver.
My question is that I would like to give the dog the raw bones of the deer to my dog. Also it has been suggested that the tongue can also be fed to the dog. Is this safe?
Also is it safe for humans to eat the rest of the offal?
Thanks
+
My dogs have had the ribs and the spine but have been told in the past don`t give them the weight bareing bones.
 

reload

Well-Known Member
+
My dogs have had the ribs and the spine but have been told in the past don`t give them the weight bareing bones.

I'm curious to know why Basil?

I give my dog the leg bones. Not too many, maybe 3 a month.
 

scubadog

Well-Known Member
My dog loves them.
The fallow pricket leg he is eating isn't sharp.
I understand that heavy weight bearing bones can break teeth but the fallow pricket seems reasonably soft without splintering.
 
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