Loading down for 270 Win

S&L7x57

Well-Known Member
I have done some reloading for my 7x57 and 270 Win but found that for normal stalking requirements factory loads were pretty much as good if I looked around so pretty much put my reloading kit aside.
However, I have been disappointed by the carcass damage on small deer (muntjac especially) that the 270W produces. I have used Federal 130 and Remington 150 which both grouped well. Excellent effect of reds and fallow but messy with muntjac.
My 7x57 seems to also make a mess if bone is encountered but then that is my Scottish Reds rifle and not often brought out for Southern woodland trips out.
I have considered replacing with a 6.5x55 but being a lefty, the cost is high and/or the search protracted.
Soooo, can I reduce noise, recoil and carcass damage by reducing velocity in a 270W, in effect mimicking the milder 6.5x55 and is there a particular bullet weight/type/make than anybody would recommend for this process.
I do not need a long distance round, I have never taken a shot at more than 200 yds.
I am really looking for a loading for times and places where I am unlikely (or not allowed) to take on the bigger species.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Sure... you can load a lighter bullet, like the 115-gr SPT made for the 6.8 SPC cartridge, to 2,800 FPS using 42.0 grains of H-4895,
or
download a 130-gr flat base SPT to about 2,800 fps with 50.5 grains of H-414, W-760, or 4350
... or 46.0 gr H-380
... 54.0 gr of H-4831
... 54.5 gr of VV N-160

All these may vary a little depending on brass, but don't go lower.
Just seat to standard SAAMI length or the same die setting for the ogive of your regular strength loads.

Load the 7x57 as you would a 7x57R, with 44.0 to 45.0 grains of H-414 or W-760 for about 2550 fps.

Or, load a tougher bullet, like a 160-gr Sierra GK HPBT or Speer for big deer.

and load a 120-gr Sierra or Hornady or Nosler BT with 43.0 gr of Varget for 2,820 fps for other deer.
 
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takbok

Well-Known Member
I got about 2650 fps with a maximum recommended load of Viht N165 (57.7gr, I think) and 150gr Norma SP bullets. Worked well on Roe.

I've since upped the load (safely) to 60gr N165 for about 2850fps.
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
Sure........All these may vary a little depending on brass, but don't go lower..........
Wise words right there. Years ago I was loading some very light loads, not quite subsonic, but something appropriate for shooting the odd fur bearer that came by without damaging the hide. I ended up with a shot at a steep downward angle out of a high seat that squibbed on me and stuck the bullet about 8 inches down the pipe.

Did get the bullet out, but had to go back and pull all the bullets on that lot. The cartridge autopsy showed that the powder all moved forward on a downward shot and resulted in incomplete or delayed powder ignition. Lesson learned the hard way.
 

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
Increased bullet weight
decreased charge
choose a harder, less expansive bullet

all work towards your chosen goals
i run 54.5gr n160 under 130gr Hornady interlocks for 2775fps MV
light rifle, light recoil, works well on small and medium sized deer.

there are monolithic bullet options that work without shedding mass or creating vast areas of bruising and meat damage. You still want organ damage obviously
 

S&L7x57

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the advice, very useful. I'll look through my stuff and see what I've got. I guess I am going to need a chronograph? Any suggestions for a (cheaper) product for occasional use?
 

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
You can but only the carcase will tell you what works.
chrony make cheap chronographs

book load data can be extrapolated to give rough MV, your MV will always be less than book (think VW mpg data....)
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
book load data can be extrapolated to give rough MV, your MV will always be less than book (think VW mpg data....)
That seems usually to be correct.

However, my father has a .243 that gives pressure-signs only slightly above starting loads. The MVs from this rifle with both factory- and hand-loads are markedly higher than 'book' values.

So, while the economy of powder and 'speed' of that particular .243 barrel are useful properties, it is also a valuable lesson on why starting loads are so called!
 

NoIDeer

Well-Known Member
Increased bullet weight
decreased charge
choose a harder, less expansive bullet

all work towards your chosen goals
i run 54.5gr n160 under 130gr Hornady interlocks for 2775fps MV
light rifle, light recoil, works well on small and medium sized deer.

there are monolithic bullet options that work without shedding mass or creating vast areas of bruising and meat damage. You still want organ damage obviously
I used exactly this load for muntjac with a mv of 2670fps and found they run a bit. 57.5 gns N160, mv 2850 and they drop on the spot. Both very accurate.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Most 150-gr bullets for the .270 are pretty tough and long, high SD. When you start pushing them at 2,850 to 2,950 fps, they will knock down elk, moose, bear and boar.

I haven't tried downloading bullets like the 130-gr and 140-gr SST, which are made for impacts out at 400 yards. In a reduced load, they should offer really nice expansion at 100 to 200 yards on small deer. If any of you fellows try those, please post the results.
 

1894

Well-Known Member
Do not be tempted to go below start loads. There is a documented phenomenon of damaging pressure incidents when small amounts of powder are used. From memory it's caused by the increased surface area of powder available to the primer flame.
 

Highlandsjohn

Well-Known Member
Do not be tempted to go below start loads. There is a documented phenomenon of damaging pressure incidents when small amounts of powder are used. From memory it's caused by the increased surface area of powder available to the primer flame.
This has been discussed on the forum a few times. However, using Hodgdon H4895 60% rule for youth loads it should look like this.

Your search returned 1 load.
Case: Winchester
Twist: 1:10"
Primer: Winchester LR, Large Rifle
Barrel Length: 24"
Trim Length: 2.530"










140 GR. SFT SP
Manufacturer Hodgdon
Powder H4895
Bullet Diameter .277"
C.O.L. 3.280"
Starting Load
Grains 40.0
Velocity (ft/s) 2,627
Pressure 45,300 CUP
Maximum Load
Grains 42.6
Velocity (ft/s) 2,768
Pressure 50,600 CUP

Maximum powder load is 42.6 Using the 60% rule for youth load =25.56grn minimum of H4895..

NOTE
H4895..IS THE ONLY HODGDON POWDER THAT CAN BE USED FOR REDUCED LOADS

THERE IS NO WAY THIS WILL BE DEER LEGAL IN THE UK, SO SOME KIND FELLOW MIGHT DO A QUICKLOAD CALCULATION AND WORK UP UNTIL THE VELOCITY IS OK,THEN USE YOUR CHRONO IN REAL TIME..

AS THE FULL STARTING LOAD FOR THIS POWDER IS 40GRN @ 2,627 FPS, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO PINCH A BIT ON THE REDUCED LOAD. GOOD LUCK TO THE OP..EVERYONE KNOWS THE 270 IS JUST A PUSSYCAT..:D
 

Sauer90

Well-Known Member
Unproven wives tale, SEE has not been demonstrated reliably.

Do not be tempted to go below start loads. There is a documented phenomenon of damaging pressure incidents when small amounts of powder are used. From memory it's caused by the increased surface area of powder available to the primer flame.
 

S&L7x57

Well-Known Member
Looking through my Lee loading manual (2nd edition), it lists loads using H4831 (which I have in stock) for both 140 & 150 bullets. Minimum loadings of 54 gns giving 2702 and 52 gns giving 2623 respectively. My local shop has Hornady 140 Interlock and I have some Speer Grand Slam 150. Do any of these combinations sound any good to you more experienced loaders?
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I use a 7mm 139g Hornady Interlock going at about 2650 fps. On Roe it just picks them up and dumps on the deck with minimal carcass damage (much less than 243 with 100gn RWS). They don't run.

In the 270 I would try a 130 or 140 gn Interlock at the same sort of speed - c50gn of IMR 4831 (starting load according to Hornady is 49.5gn, max 56gn for both weights of bullets) and would be very surprised if you didn't get similar results.
 

Uncas

Well-Known Member
I have just put some Federal 150gr round nose ammunition through my chronograph which came out at 2700 fps.
you should not get meat damage from this round.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Looking through my Lee loading manual (2nd edition), it lists loads using H4831 (which I have in stock) for both 140 & 150 bullets. Minimum loadings of 54 gns giving 2702 and 52 gns giving 2623 respectively. My local shop has Hornady 140 Interlock and I have some Speer Grand Slam 150. Do any of these combinations sound any good to you more experienced loaders?
The Speer Grand Slam is a tougher bullet, made for big game like elk, moose, bear, etc.

For deer, go with the Hornady 140-gr Interlock or SST.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
In my Game Book I wrote this in November 2007.

Hornady 140 grn Interlock BTSP - Viht 160 52.4 grn = 2,858fps.

Hornady 140 grn Interlock BTSP - Hodgdon H483:

55.4 grn = 2,856 fps
56.0 grn = 2,867 fps
56.5 grn = 2,892 fps
56.8 grn = 2,905 fps

Then in November 2008.

Hornady 150 grn Interlock Flat Base Spitzer - Hodgdon H4831 55.0 grn = 2,809 fps*

* Velocities over five rounds all within 30 fps (2,801 - 2,831 fps) with CCI Large Rifle Standard primer.
 

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