Loading for Chamois?

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
All, seeking collective wisdom here:

I’m really hankering after a chamois and thinking of going for one next year.

What bullet would you recommend out of a 7x64? Those accubond long range look quite good? Any other suggestions?

KR,

Scrummy
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Chamois are not big animals, but often will be shot at longer range. I would use whatever you are comfortable shooting out of your 7x64 but at the faster end of the scale - possibly not the 173/175 gn bullets - a 140 or 150 gn will give you a flatter trajectory. I would n't use something overly tough either - an SST is probably a good bullet as its aerodynamic and designed to open at reasonably low velocities down range.

Ask your guide what they use / recommend.
 

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
Thanks Heym, I usually use 165gr flat base soft points. Works well on game but the BC isn't great and goes from the muzzle about 2,700 fps so something a bit faster and flatter would seem to be better

Scrummy
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Would you take on a Roe Buck with that load at 200 yds - if its accurate and you sight it 1" high or a bit more at 100 you might be surprised how flat it shoots - have a play with the Hornady Ballistics calculator on their website. Try the 162 gn SST.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I am looking at the 154gn Flat based soft point Interlock for my 7x65r - BC of .433 - Have just plugged the numbers in to the calculator. 2700 fps with a 200 yd zero.

Screen Shot 2017-05-04 at 13.42.59.png


With the 154 gn SST - BC of .525 the following

Screen Shot 2017-05-04 at 13.44.06.png

At 250 yds the drop 3.3" as opposed to 3.4" and at 300 its 8.2 as opposed to 8.6.

Appreciate the above are theroretical - i would stick with whatever was most accurate.
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
I went to the Pyrenees last year and shot my first. Longest shot presented was under 300 meters. The ground was pretty good for stalking so eventually took a shot at 170 meters. There was none of the 400 to 500 meter extreme stuff you read about in NZ.

I used the Barnes 145 LRX from a 280AI at 3150 fps. It proved perfect for the job, as it is with Reds on the hill. As Heym says, they are not big animals, Roe sized, you just need to get the bullet there and do a bit of wind dodging on the way. High BC is good. I think 7mm is just about perfect.
 

scotch_egg

Well-Known Member
Are you currently using factory Geco?

what I would say is don't be taken in by the idea light weight bullets are flatter. The B.C gains of the heavier bullets have a significant benefit. I have used the 140gr nosler ballistic tip for years in my 7-08. I bought some 120gr and ran the figures to my dismay.


My best advice that I never stick to myself is use one bullit for everything and get to know it. I am intending to use the Geco factory ammunition in my 7X64 so long as it groups sub MOA. Reloading can become a chore when you have several calibres.
 

Kalahari

Well-Known Member
This sounds sensible. Just move your zero out further so that the likely ranges require a bit less correction?

David.
 

minikeeper

Well-Known Member
Chamois are easy to kill but often hard to hit. A .223 will crumple them reliably so don't over think it
 

greville1689

Well-Known Member
It is a while since I was lucky enough to be invited to stalk chamois in the Austrian Alps, but the stalker's rifle that I borrowed was a .243". I am not sure what the bullet weight was but assume it was 90 or 100gn. As minikeeper says they are not difficult to bring down and there is no need for 'big' calibres. Ranges will vary depending on the terrain - I had to shoot one at about 250-300 yards because there was a very deep gorge in between and that was a close as I was going to get. If you are taking your own rifle take whichever you are happy and most confident with and just zero it a little bit higher at 100m.
 

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
Are you currently using factory Geco?

what I would say is don't be taken in by the idea light weight bullets are flatter. The B.C gains of the heavier bullets have a significant benefit. I have used the 140gr nosler ballistic tip for years in my 7-08. I bought some 120gr and ran the figures to my dismay.


My best advice that I never stick to myself is use one bullit for everything and get to know it. I am intending to use the Geco factory ammunition in my 7X64 so long as it groups sub MOA. Reloading can become a chore when you have several calibres.
Hi Scotch egg, yes it's the factory Geco but with a .360BC I feel we could go a bit better. ABLR 150gr with .611 should going say 2800-2900fps is really quite flat...
 

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
This sounds sensible. Just move your zero out further so that the likely ranges require a bit less correction?

David.
Usually zero the 7x64 with the Geco 165gr soft pointat about 200. MPBR (3" radius vital zone) with that load at 2675fps is 260yds (Drop 300 = 7.6" and 400 = 25.4") so beyond 300 holding above the back...

I like the Geco loading but perhaps not best for this
 

Cumbrian 1

Well-Known Member
Hi Mike

I used a sierra gameking 175grn soft point on my alpine chamois and a 168 berger vld on my isard, I think a bullet that will open up quickly is a must as they are small soft skinned animals.

Don't worry about the holdover use a PM2 and just dial.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
Never mind the calibre and/or load, unless the rifle is a:- of stutzen configuration and b;- the scope is secured by Conetrol rings & mounts I would suggest postponing your Goat Shoot until "suitable adjustments to one's kit" have been made.

But then again you may wish to simply focus on what your bullet does in a 15MPH wind at 300 yards!

K
;)
 

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
Hi Mike

I used a sierra gameking 175grn soft point on my alpine chamois and a 168 berger vld on my isard, I think a bullet that will open up quickly is a must as they are small soft skinned animals.

Don't worry about the holdover use a PM2 and just dial.
I like the logic, I like the PMII pricetag less... I have a Meopta ZD 6-24 which might do it I suppose...
 

1894

Well-Known Member
Depending on who and where you hunt you're likely to be limited to about 200m max range by the guide.

When I did it 10 years ago in the Haute Alps with the French the drill was like this.

1. Are you fit?
2. Walk from the base of the mountain up through the foothills and then onto and up the mountain.
3. See chamois peering down at us as we walked up in plain view. They look like gargoyles peering down from the roof a cathedral
4. Lots of glassing
5. Choose chamois that fits what's allowed (age, sex etc) and what you can afford (size)
6. Walk closer in plain view until you start to reach the sort of range that the chamois appreciates it's in danger
7. Stalk/move into dead ground
8. Peer around cover, guide give approximate cost
9. Ask guide if it's safe to shoot as the Chamois is standing on a rocky outcrop with only air behind it.
10 'It is safe eez only mountains'
11. Aim at center of chest - nothing clever like just behind shoulder as unknown wind across valley might shift bullet
12. Curse light rifle as heartbeat causes cross hairs to jump
13. Bang - chamois rears, drops, much congratulations.
14. Walk across to Chamois
15. An hour later, 200m descent, 3km around valley, 300m uphill arrive at Chamois
16. Much congratulations, photos etc
17. Gralloch chamois, load into rucksac a) congratulate yourself on being wise and hiring a porter or b) curse and start the journey back

FWIW a nice slippery bullet that opens fast zeroed no more than about 200-225m and a simple scope all of which you know well and can shoot under some pressure. I wouldn't go too light and I certainly wouldn't drag clicks etc around. 7x64 is an excellent choice - you can get ammo in sports shops in France.

Have fun - it's the most memorable stalking I've done.
 

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