Low Numbers Of Muntjac

Cougar

Well-Known Member
In my area of Essex (not far from Stansted) I've noticed a real drop in the numbers of muntjac over the last few years, has anyone else seen this in Essex or anywhere else for that matter? The last month I've been seeing a few more but nothing like there use to be.

Matt
 

Munty1

Well-Known Member
last year we shot 72 which was about average, I have not seen as many about this year as I would expect. It may just be the mild weather, they are not having to travel much to find food.
 

Quercus

Well-Known Member
I have permission on ground near Stansted. I did notice that this year there were fewer muntjac around. I don't know if it is coincidence or not, but they have recently had a big problem with hare coursers on the ground. Piles of dead hare have been found in fields, but there has been no evidence to suggest they were after any deer.

Can't help thinking it might be contributing to the lack of sightings, either through dispersal or them just sitting very tight (I bumped one on Thursday 6ft from my feet, it then did a belly flop into a stream before hightailing it - first time I've seen a swimming munty). Nevertheless, there may be some other explaination... especially if it is happening in other areas.
 

Paul at Fechan

Well-Known Member
2 harsher winters recently with heavily increased mortality in the worst months? All other influences are likely to remain the same, ie poaching and legitimate hunting etc
 

atom

Well-Known Member
i have some ground near newport pagnell i shot 7 in 2 days still seeing plenty about more than last year mainly in a morning
 

Munty Hunter

Well-Known Member
Numbers seem fairly normal here, but then the numbers are not that high anyway. The smaller population may mean the animals were able to find shelter in the harsh weather last winter, I wonder how much shelter is available in relation to population density. Where i was keeping last year, in the heaviest snow a Muntjac could be found under just about every pheasant shelter.
 

Eyefor

Well-Known Member
I think they are being poached in some areas because, not so long ago, if you were out lamping for foxes then the munties would just stare at you. Shine a lamp on them on one of my permissions now and they are off - bloody quickly - so something is making them nervous?
 

chriseoe

Well-Known Member
Over the last two cold winters the average carcass weights stayed stable accross all age groups (thetford area), the young ages av weight did drop slightly (1lb), that would suggest that the cold winters have not led to increased mortality, not to say that new borns wouldn't have died if born into a very cold snap. I aggree with a previous comment, it is very mild at the moment and there is still a lot of food everywhere. When it gets cold they will have to move.
 

mark@mbb

Well-Known Member
Thats what happened to the dodo maybe they are telling you they need a closed season or they will be eradicated every man with a gun and every hunter with a longdog is after them 24 / 7 htey is only so many to go around ask muntystalker he gives thema rest when the cover starts to grow maybe everyone else should follow suit its okay people sayig they want them off there land once they are gone there will be a lot of stalkers with no dee to shoot

Okay rant over

Atb Mark
 

keith@honda

Well-Known Member
hi there is plenty of urban ones about saw one near west suffolk hospital and one on tescos roundabout both in bury st edmunds, i feel that with the mild weather at the mo they are more spread out they will soon come in near the feeders as it gets colder
 

Cougar

Well-Known Member
Would it not be possible that there are a lot more stalkers about now and they are reducing the numbers in your area
Your probably right when I stop to think about it, they are under a little more pressure than 10 years ago but the numbers have really fell away. I use to be able to put someone on a muntjac with no worries but not any more.
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
2 harsher winters recently with heavily increased mortality in the worst months? All other influences are likely to remain the same, ie poaching and legitimate hunting etc
another reason muntys seem to do well on ground that is keepered ie fox control ,hoppers ,maize .even when weather is the worst these great little deer can find shelter and a bite to eat on a game shoot .
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Although I am not refering to Muntjac, I can refer to Fallow, Roe and Jap Sika and the last three weeks especially. It has been a very warm early winter. Two weeks ago I was stalking Sika in Dorset, the temperature at midday on one day reached 18c. This weekend I was stalking in Sussex, the temp on the car dash board was reading 14c at 9pm :eek:. Thats warmer than many summer evenings!!

I agree with what has been mentioned, it has been far to warm and the deer are not moving as much. I would hope that the reduction in Muntjac on your ground is mostly down to the weather and not poaching. Deer do have a habit of having cycles where upon they seem to dissapear for a while even though they are on the ground or in the area. Fallow seem to be masters at this.

I have just noticed that this morning we have had a mild frost, thats the first one this winter down here.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
I suspect density of foxes on your ground could well be a major factor. It has been clearly shown that fox numbers have a big impact on roe kid survival and same is true for hares so I suspect munties are a similar scenario.

Just my thoughts

D
 

Top