Lynx reintroduction rejected

Ray7756

Well-Known Member
#3
Thank god for good sense,,,just need to wait and see the huggers response,, but they wont be best pleased
Ray
 

tozzybum

Well-Known Member
#5
Let the enviroloons and their families camp for 6 months in their enclosure and see if their views of tiddles way of life changes any.Certain critters are no longer resident here for a reason and it,s something called mmm "common sense "
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#7
Quite a lengthy response to the application, rejecting the proposal. Lets hope that nails this once and for all into the ground. One would hope they would concentrate their efforts on the Scottish Wildcat conservation, and not some pie in the sky reintroduction of Lynx.
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
#12
Interesting and detailed report from DEFRA which exposes the weaknesses in the ‘project’.

The Lynx U.K. Trust come across as a couple (and there are only two of them) of chancers who can muster the usual social media shouty sheeple to further the cause.

Example of their ‘evidence’ to support the introduction as reported by DEFRA:

“Great emphasis has been put on the involvement and support of Kielder First School which at the time of application had less than ten pupils.”

You couldn’t make it up!
 

BryanDC

Well-Known Member
#13
Interesting and detailed report from DEFRA which exposes the weaknesses in the ‘project’.

The Lynx U.K. Trust come across as a couple (and there are only two of them) of chancers who can muster the usual social media shouty sheeple to further the cause.

Example of their ‘evidence’ to support the introduction as reported by DEFRA:

“Great emphasis has been put on the involvement and support of Kielder First School which at the time of application had less than ten pupils.”

You couldn’t make it up!

I thought the same. It seems it was a very amateur approach to the whole thing and quite rightly rejected.
 

Sash

Well-Known Member
#14
Interesting and detailed report from DEFRA which exposes the weaknesses in the ‘project’.
I thought the DEFRA report was particularly well-written, and leaves open no wriggle room for appeal etc.
I think it sets a very high hurdle for any future reintroduction project, especially of a large predator, and shows quite how important adherence to the process is over just emotion and enthusiasm.
 

victormeldrew

Well-Known Member
#15
A great result, lets hope that is the door closed on this subject.

Incidentally, I read in a recent copy of Scottish Farmer, that Dr O'Donoghue is also advising Wildcat Haven on the introduction of wildcats to Galloway.
Wildcat Haven are an an independent project that has so far concentrated its efforts in the Lochaber area.
It appears that the stock for the introduction will be sourced from wild-living European populations, as the Highlands can't afford to lose any Scottish Wildcats.

It is hoped to encourage the new population to spread into Cumbria & Northumberland.

victor
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
#16
Pace brothers did a podcast with Above mentioned Dr .
Everything he said has turned up with zero backing to what he stated ....
These rewilders seriously have heads jammed up their arses.!
Still get people saying lynx won’t attack sheep
That buzzards only eat carrion
Despite evidence to the contrary and they always ignore the eye witness testimony of the people ( gamekeepers stalkers Ghillies etc)


Paul
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
#19
I don't have any real issue with the reintroduction of predators. We in the west and modern world shoudl be doing our bit for the conservation of these species. Ditto for raptors etc. And their persecution to extinction which happened in previous generations should be undone. There are plenty of good food supplies to maintain such predators, but we need a collective approach, which will include shooting on occasion - in my view necessary to keep them used to the idea that Man is dangerous. Once their numbers are at a level - have a quota and sell as trophies.

In terms of sheep and cattle, there are plenty of good husbandry methods that are centuries old that allow such animals to be reared successfully with wild predators around. However it does require a little more input than simply rounding them up once a year as many hill sheep are.
 

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