massive canebreak rattlesnake captured

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#3
My friend in Georgia came up with the best use for a rattlesnake I've ever seen . . . . . I came home to a package a while ago with this inside. He's ankle-deep in canebrakes at certain times of the year. Isn't this something? I'd like to bet there's not many of these in the country
 

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Rasputin

Well-Known Member
#4
I thought they got longer for some reason. Hell of a girth on it. I am fascinated by snakes and always interested in them.Probably because we don't really have any over here. Nice to see it with its head still on.
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
#6
Glad to see he didn't kill it. I was taught that as long as they are not near the house/barn they are filling a niche and serving a purpose. Once you get over the fear factor, they really are a beautiful creature in their own way.
 
#7
Very nice snake,be a few years old being that big,,,mind you warm weather lots of rats /mice equals big snake,,,,rasputin we have adders and grass snakes,nowhere near as big as that one but just as nice,:thumb:
 

Rasputin

Well-Known Member
#8
Very nice snake,be a few years old being that big,,,mind you warm weather lots of rats /mice equals big snake,,,,rasputin we have adders and grass snakes,nowhere near as big as that one but just as nice,:thumb:
I don't even class them as proper snakes. Too small and non deadly lol. Used to have a lot of grass snakes in the water in Geneva. Very surreal sat sunbathing and they just swim or slither across you. Quite friendly really. Have only seen a handful of grass snakes up here guess like many thing they are threatened with habitat distraction so will see less and less. :(
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
#9
Most canebreak or timber rattlers are around three feet long. This is a gargantuan one. I met a turkey hunter last year who had been bitten by one in the mountains of Tennessee, after the wildlife department had stocked the area with some from South Carolina. He was not too happy about it.

The Eastern Diamondback can get to eight feet or so. Six footers are not uncommon. That is more snake than you want biting you. Luckily, they are not as aggressive as the water moccasin and copperhead are.
 

Rasputin

Well-Known Member
#10
Most canebreak or timber rattlers are around three feet long. This is a gargantuan one. I met a turkey hunter last year who had been bitten by one in the mountains of Tennessee, after the wildlife department had stocked the area with some from South Carolina. He was not too happy about it.

The Eastern Diamondback can get to eight feet or so. Six footers are not uncommon. That is more snake than you want biting you. Luckily, they are not as aggressive as the water moccasin and copperhead are.

I read an article where a hunter or fisherman git bit and i think the medical bill was over $500k :eek:. Just to add insulr to injuty. I think was in texas.
 

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