Mauser Stalker

Ronin

Distinguished Member
May be of interest to those who appreciate the classic stalking rifle

Client requested a rebarrel - tidy up of a Mauser Stalking rifle, which was made by Bancroft in, I believe the 80's

The rifle is well stocked, but has been used for its purpose and was shot out, at some point the trigger has been replaced with a Timney unit - very nice release.

The rifle was stripped down once with me and a replacement CM barrel sourced of similar profile to the original.

Once the barrel was fitted and chambered in 6.5x55 it was sent to Proof.

A few weeks later it arrived back, all parts were then sent to Midcounties Blacking for a "best" finish

Another short wait - Darren and team are very busy (because they are excellent at what they do) at MCB

The finished parts arrived back and I have to say the finish is stunning.

I set about prepping the stock for bedding and machined a pair of custom pillars in stainless to support the forwards and rear action / bottom metal

The original stock maker has done a very nice job of inletting and whilst the mid area of the action was unsupported, I decided to leave this alone as the woodwork and action are relatively thin in this area and I do not believe would benefit from bedding (this rifle only in this instance)

The forward pillar was machined to fit the forward "pillar) of the bottom metal

The rear machined to fit the collar of the action and also fit in the recess of the bottom metal - avoiding having to machine a draft angle for this pillar to fit the bottom metal and contact effectively

Once prepared and everything tested for fit and operation, the metalwork was prepared with release agent, plugging material for the voids and bedding compound was applied.

The barrelled action, bottom metal, pillars were bedded in one operation.

Not a job for the faint hearted

24 hrs later, the bottom metal, barrelled action were removed from the stock.

Cleaned up and all reassembled, with some application of elbow grease to the stock and buffing wax compound

Some pics

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Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Why is grey bedding visible alongside the the action. Surely you can leave a decent bit of wood and then let the bedding support the action either side of the pillars. It will shoot just as well and its how the likes of Rigby bed their Highland Stalker from the factory.

To be honest if there are good pillars and the stock was well inletted in the first place why do you need to bed the action? The wood is now very well seasoned and if it was going to move it would have done so.
 

Ronin

Distinguished Member
Why is grey bedding visible alongside the the action. Surely you can leave a decent bit of wood and then let the bedding support the action either side of the pillars. It will shoot just as well and its how the likes of Rigby bed their Highland Stalker from the factory.

To be honest if there are good pillars and the stock was well inletted in the first place why do you need to bed the action? The wood is now very well seasoned and if it was going to move it would have done so.


The action inlet was “good “,,,,but there was no contact between the pillar in the bottom metal and no pillar at the rear tang, there was also limited contact with the recoil lug

That is the reason for bedding the rifle and inserting pillars was to maintain accuracy in all conditions and repeatable return into the stock after maintainence / cleaning - as requested by the client

The visible lines - they are not really apparent when you have the rifle in hand and whilst they are there - no wood - absolutely no wood - was removed in the upper “shut line” area which indicates the action was not fully supported in that area

Rigby may well bed their products in the way you’ve said - it would be possible to do but add to the cost of the work in preparation and finishing

You’re comparing a rifle built new today circa 10 k to a well used and working Mauser built in the 80’s that is worth a fraction of that and will ultimately be a working gun, not something to use once a year on the hill when presented to the user you by a Ghil lie
 

moray loon

Well-Known Member
The action inlet was “good “,,,,but there was no contact between the pillar in the bottom metal and no pillar at the rear tang, there was also limited contact with the recoil lug

That is the reason for bedding the rifle and inserting pillars was to maintain accuracy in all conditions and repeatable return into the stock after maintainence / cleaning - as requested by the client

The visible lines - they are not really apparent when you have the rifle in hand and whilst they are there - no wood - absolutely no wood - was removed in the upper “shut line” area which indicates the action was not fully supported in that area

Rigby may well bed their products in the way you’ve said - it would be possible to do but add to the cost of the work in preparation and finishing

You’re comparing a rifle built new today circa 10 k to a well used and working Mauser built in the 80’s that is worth a fraction of that and will ultimately be a working gun, not something to use once a year on the hill when presented to the user you by a Ghil lie
Beautiful job !! Well done !
 

JH83

Well-Known Member
I can assure you @Ronin the end user is very happy and keen to get his hands on the rifle. He has a day booked on the hill in Perthshire mid rut where he intends to blood the rifle which I think is befitting. As with the guns you have made me I’m confident it will be a ‘shooter’. I’ll let you know how it goes.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
The action inlet was “good “,,,,but there was no contact between the pillar in the bottom metal and no pillar at the rear tang, there was also limited contact with the recoil lug

That is the reason for bedding the rifle and inserting pillars was to maintain accuracy in all conditions and repeatable return into the stock after maintainence / cleaning - as requested by the client

The visible lines - they are not really apparent when you have the rifle in hand and whilst they are there - no wood - absolutely no wood - was removed in the upper “shut line” area which indicates the action was not fully supported in that area

Rigby may well bed their products in the way you’ve said - it would be possible to do but add to the cost of the work in preparation and finishing

You’re comparing a rifle built new today circa 10 k to a well used and working Mauser built in the 80’s that is worth a fraction of that and will ultimately be a working gun, not something to use once a year on the hill when presented to the user you by a Ghil lie
I wasn’t criticising, It was more of an observation/ question. Can you colour the bedding compound you are using, black or walnut brown is much less visible than grey? And fully appreciate comments on it being a working rifle rather than a safe queen.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Here's one I just finished , it's a 1980ish H&R Model 340 in 30/06 . Not quite the same pedigree as above, but it's in for some rough use during this falls Moose hunt . The checkering was worn down to the point that it was just an outline , so I just recheckered the existing pattern . The stock was redone using an oil finish and it was rebedded with a marine epoxy ( takes the cold really well ) The scope is a 35 year old Leupold M8 4 power that I bought new , it still tracks a square perfectly . It will keep three 180 gr Nosler Partitions inside an inch and points like your finger . I do love a good 30/06 ........... that's probably why I own four of them lol . A bit dated for some on here , I'm sure , but it's perfect for my needs .
 

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