Measuring the bore of a .22 Hornet

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
Folks,

I have an old WW Greener Martini (1902)
I suspect that back in the day it was a (?) .310 Rook rifle. I should like to reload for this because my life is not too complicated already.
Having a wee look at the Nosler Bumper Book on reloading and it talks about the originals having a bore of .222" with most modern rifles at .224".

So by two schoolboy questions are:-

1) What is the best way to measure the old girl's bore?

2) What bullet do I need to be looking at?

Thanks awfully.22 Hornet.JPG
 

Fosbery Holster

Well-Known Member
This is the method I’ve used for pistols and Rook Rifles in the past to slug the bore, choose a soft lead bullet of the appropriate bore size and have a wooden dowel that will slide into the bore without too much play, lubricate the bore with copious amounts of oil through the chamber allowing the oil to run into the barrel, lubricate the bullet also before dropping into the chamber to engage the rifling, put the dowel through the chamber to engage the base of the bullet and tap through the barrel using, in my case a wooden mallet, when the bullet has passed through the bore it’s then easy to measure the diameter of the slug.

If you’re not confident to do this with certainty that you will succeed ask your local Gunsmith to do it for you..........nobody wants a bullet stuck tightly in the bore.

This method is merely a suggestion !!

PS. .310 isn’t a Rook Rifle calibre, it was a cadet rifle calibre.
 

Oracle

Well-Known Member
From my reading, during the original development of the Hornet during the late 1920s -30s, some Greener Martini action & Springfield .22LRs were modified to fire the new Hornet cartridge. Many of these “original” rifles had bore diameter of .223, however when manufacturers started producing 22 Hornets en mass, they were with bore diameters of .224. My 1949 BRNO Hornets both have bore diameters of .224. Sierra still manufacture Hornet 40g & 45g projectiles with .223 diameter.
If your Hornet has a .223 bore diameter, I have a box of each going begging that you are welcome to.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Firstly, you're not slugging the bore, you're determining the groove diameter. That said, I'd chamber a round of factory Hornet and shoot it. I have had a number of ".223" Hornets that shot .224" bullets jut fine.~Muir
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
Firstly, you're not slugging the bore, you're determining the groove diameter. That said, I'd chamber a round of factory Hornet and shoot it. I have had a number of ".223" Hornets that shot .224" bullets jut fine.~Muir
Muir,

Muir, Muir, Muir,.....

Always with the technical expertise, invariably followed with the Nike slogan - "Just do it".

What would site do without you? 👍
 

Fosbery Holster

Well-Known Member
The majority of small bore rifles that l have handled with lined barrels have been converted by Parker Hale “Parkerifled”, obviously my assumption was incorrect and your rifle barrel was lined by an unknown Gunsmith as we now can see with the photo of the muzzle, l have viewed this type before even on the best English guns, but rarely.

It’s good to be corrected by someone with far more knowledge, everyday is a school day, we live and learn.
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
PS. .310 isn’t a Rook Rifle calibre, it was a cadet rifle calibre.
Funny you should say that. I bought this a couple of years ago.

BSA .310 Cadet Rifle - made in Birmingham.
Exported out to the "Commonwealth of Australia" - New South Wales.
Found by a Brit in an American Gun Fair - returned to the UK.
Bought by me.

More worldly travelled than I am.
Whilst it is an obsolete calibre, I had it put "on ticket" this renewal and have made up some rounds. Will have a play when CV19 fu*ks off.

I rather pathetically tried to use the Grandchildren as the reason for buying it - to teach them firearms safety - my wife was having none of it.

I said, "It's a rifle that is made for children. It's perfect".

"She is two years old!"

"But big for her age!" was apparently not an appropriate response...
 

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hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
I've got a Martini Cadet in 223Rimmed. It was 222Super but when I ran out of the super rare Super cases I reamed it to 223 and used 5.56 x50 RWS cases shortened to 223 length.
The largest case I have heard that fitted into a Cadet was the 44 magnum.
The barrel has to be inteference fitted and pinned not threaded as there is no meat left after reaming it out.
 

hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
The .310 is hard to get bullets for, as it uses a .324 diameter projectile.
The most commonly found projectile and one that reloaders have tried to use is the American .32, which is actually .312.
This means the bullet just rattles down the barrel and wobbles it's way downrange. This has led some to think that their .310 is worn out, or that the caliber is inaccurate.
Another case of the British understatement and American exaggeration.
(Tongue in cheek)
 

Stalker1962

Well-Known Member
The .310 is hard to get bullets for..
I have bought a .310 CBE bullet mould.
120g .310 bullets from the Shellhouse Bullet Company (UK).
.310 brass from Spud1967 (UK) but made it Australia - was £1 a throw last year now going for £2 a throw.
5g of Bulls Eye Pistol powder.

A lot of expense and faff just so my "granddaughter" can learn to shoot....
 

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