Military 7.62 brass

welshwarrior

Well-Known Member
I've got a fair bit of 7.62 brass here and not sure what to do with it I can reload it with the funny primer, anyone got a use for it?
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
I've got a fair bit of 7.62 brass here and not sure what to do with it I can reload it with the funny primer, anyone got a use for it?
Opinions seem to vary on this. RG use an elliptical crimp, and other milsurp comes with a stake crimp. It's hard brass - like iron. A few out of a batch can be primed, but most need the primers crushed in or are just plain uncooperative.

I've reamed out a lot with a rotary trimmer assembly, and there's quite a bit of swarf buildup at the end of the job. I wouldn't say these were reloadable generally.
 

welshwarrior

Well-Known Member
Opinions seem to vary on this. RG use an elliptical crimp, and other milsurp comes with a stake crimp. It's hard brass - like iron. A few out of a batch can be primed, but most need the primers crushed in or are just plain uncooperative.

I've reamed out a lot with a rotary trimmer assembly, and there's quite a bit of swarf buildup at the end of the job. I wouldn't say these were reloadable generally.

That sounds a lot of hard work really.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I've got a fair bit of 7.62 brass here and not sure what to do with it I can reload it with the funny primer, anyone got a use for it?
Do you mean Berdan primed or simply crimped in boxer primers. If it is berdan primed it's not worth the effort but if it is simply a crimped or staked boxer primer then the crimp is easily removed and the cases can well be worth the effort of reloading.
In recent years all british military ammo has been boxer primed and it will only usually be the old RG stuff that was berdan primed.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
When I look inside I can make out the base of the case with 2 small flash holes.
So berdan primed, not worth trying to reload that is if you can source berdan primers in the first place. I haven't seen any gun shops selling berdan primers in the last 30 or so years but I suppose they would be available somewhere if you looked hard enough.
 

deeangeo

Well-Known Member
Do you mean Berdan primed or simply crimped in boxer primers. If it is berdan primed it's not worth the effort but if it is simply a crimped or staked boxer primer then the crimp is easily removed and the cases can well be worth the effort of reloading.
In recent years all british military ammo has been boxer primed and it will only usually be the old RG stuff that was berdan primed.
Spot on :thumb:- 2 flash holes = Berdan primed...not worth the effort is my view. ATB
 

dodgyrog

Well-Known Member
All you guys giving up on berdan primed cases are missing a treat.
I have to say that the RG (Radway Green) brass is ok to use but the full circular crimp is a pain. I can get the primers out with a hydraulic decapper but the MEN and DAG (German) brass is much easier to work with.
I did shoot 40 rounds of RG reloads at the range on Sunday but I won't be using them again. They are hard to size right down to the case head.
I have several 100 German brass I'll use for my next reloading session.
Berdan primers can be bought - RWS make them.
I have a few 1000 No 81 berdan primers in stock - enough to keep me going for the rest of my shooting life. They do pop up now and then and I know of one potential source if I run short.
If you wonder why I bother - just look at the price of non military brass when you can get berdan primed for nothing. Oh, and the fact that military brass allows you to use 5% less powder.
 

MARCBO

Account Suspended
All you guys giving up on berdan primed cases are missing a treat.
I have to say that the RG (Radway Green) brass is ok to use but the full circular crimp is a pain. I can get the primers out with a hydraulic decapper but the MEN and DAG (German) brass is much easier to work with.
I did shoot 40 rounds of RG reloads at the range on Sunday but I won't be using them again. They are hard to size right down to the case head.
I have several 100 German brass I'll use for my next reloading session.
Berdan primers can be bought - RWS make them.
I have a few 1000 No 81 berdan primers in stock - enough to keep me going for the rest of my shooting life. They do pop up now and then and I know of one potential source if I run short.
If you wonder why I bother - just look at the price of non military brass when you can get berdan primed for nothing. Oh, and the fact that military brass allows you to use 5% less powder.
Retired with no other activities are you?

SS
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
I reckon free brass and a 5% reduction in powder usage for the same performance against civilian brass is a pretty significant saving if you shoot sufficient amounts..............
 

dodgyrog

Well-Known Member
I reckon free brass and a 5% reduction in powder usage for the same performance against civilian brass is a pretty significant saving if you shoot sufficient amounts..............
And you don't have to worry if you drop a case in the long grass.
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
When I used a .308 for driven boar abroad I always used Miltary brass as in most countrys the ground was covered in snow so a rapid reload could take place without having to worry about brass :)
 

MARCBO

Account Suspended
When I used a .308 for driven boar abroad I always used Miltary brass as in most countrys the ground was covered in snow so a rapid reload could take place without having to worry about brass :)
I always figured the loss of a 30 cent piece of brass against the acquisition of many pounds of meat was more than worthwhile.

SS
 

EMcC

Well-Known Member
I always figured the loss of a 30 cent piece of brass against the acquisition of many pounds of meat was more than worthwhile.SS
Yes, you are correct if every shot counted, but quite often the first shot acts as a 'sighter' with me when doing rapid aquisition shooting.
 

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