Muntjac fawns

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#1
Can anyone help me out here. If I see a Muntjac Doe with a fawn, when is it safe to shoot the mother without leaving a dependant fawn? I've seen fawns as big as the mother, I imagine that they will be weaned. But what of smaller fawns?

Thank you.
 

The Mole

Well-Known Member
#2
Muntie fawns are weaned at about 2 months old. This is also the age at which their spots disappear therefore no spots = weaned is a fair rule of thumb.
 
D

DaveG

Guest
#4
Shot the dam and don't move, the fawn won't have gone very far and will soon return, and you then do the honours with that as well. Conscience is then clear, job done, and all is well with the world.
 

ladystalker

Well-Known Member
#5
quote="Beowulf"]

I get a bit queasy about shooting fawns so now I don't have too! :D

Beowulf
How do you get on shooting a munty doe which is pregnant and having to grallock it does that make you queasy too. ;)
You would think me being female would find this upsetting but it doesnt I am more focused on the task that lays ahead that it doesnt seem to affect me.
:eek: :eek:
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#6
Hi LadyStalker,
So far I haven't shot a pregnant muntjac doe, although I have seen a doe in the late stages and resolved myself to shoot her before she gives birth. I'll do it given the chance but I admit I will feel queezy at seeing the foetus. Its just the way I am, I would feel just as bad if I wounded a deer and it got away. Its the way i am, I have learnt to live with my feelings and balance it out with reason. I love life and its mysteries, to end a life is a difficult thing. But I deer stalk! Its a Yin and yang thing going on! :D
 

ladystalker

Well-Known Member
#7
Hi Mr B

It is sad to end a life but i do find it easier to do it this way than to shoot a fawn coming to its dead mother to be honest i dont think i could do it .
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#8
Hi Lady Stalker,
Yes I'm in complete agreement with you. But sometimes it has to be done, I just hope that it's a long time before I have to.
 

ladystalker

Well-Known Member
#9
My OH was almost put off stalking a long long time ago not long after he started
he was a paying guest on a estate in Scotland stalking roe bucks he and his guide had stalked into 2 roe late one evening and he was told to take one of the deer which unfortunately turned out to be a doe and yes you guessed it she was just about to drop when he returned to the jeep he was white as a ghost and totally gutted as he told me it was better that way than having very young fawns starving to death but what happened that day has left a mark and a very valuable lesson learnt never take it for granted what you are told to shoot always make sure you can identify it yourself.
 

The Mole

Well-Known Member
#11
It's the great paradox - the bigger the muntjac foetus, the more humane the cull has been. At the end of the day we've got to keep the muntie numbers down, and we won't do this by shooting bucks.

Large foetuses are distasteful to find, but to be frank & practical they're just as dead whatever their size. Each to their own, mind, and I wouldn't do down anyone who is queasy about it. I'd never deliberately shoot a nursing doe though and rely on the fawn offering a shot afterwards. Too risky.
 
5

5ways

Guest
#12
The Mole said:
It's the great paradox - the bigger the muntjac foetus, the more humane the cull has been. At the end of the day we've got to keep the muntie numbers down, and we won't do this by shooting bucks.

Large foetuses are distasteful to find, but to be frank & practical they're just as dead whatever their size. Each to their own, mind, and I wouldn't do down anyone who is queasy about it. I'd never deliberately shoot a nursing doe though and rely on the fawn offering a shot afterwards. Too risky.
Is it sport or is it management/control.

If you're in it for the former then fine, that's your choice. If you're there for the purpose of control/management then consider it a bonus as you've just taken one off your future cull figures.

As Mole said " they're just as dead whatever their size." and its better that you take the nursing fawn rather then leave it to the foxes and badgers.
 

MarkH

Well-Known Member
#13
Not to sure I agree with DaveG

I work on the theory

1. Shoot a pregnant doe
2.Shoot the fawn if it is not weaned.
3.Shoot the doe if the fawn is weaned

However each to their own.

Mark
 
5

5ways

Guest
#14
MarkH said:
Not to sure I agree with DaveG

I work on the theory

1. Shoot a pregnant doe
2.Shoot the fawn if it is not weaned.
3.Shoot the doe if the fawn is weaned

However each to their own.

Mark
Mark

Given the breeding cycle of Munties, 90% of the does you'll shoot will be up the duff. Does don't really start to show their pregnancy state until quite late into the gestation period. If the fawns real young it wont be with the doe, she'll leave it holed up somewhere. How are you planning on dealing with that one?

If you only ever shoot heavily pregnant does you'll never control muntjac. They will out breed you rate of attrition, to a point where you'll have no choice but to harden your management practices

That newly weaned fawn wont have gone very far once you've shot the doe, just hang around and you'll get the pair and done it a favour, to boot.
 

buckup

Well-Known Member
#15
A mate was out on our small patch at the weekend, he says he saw a munty doe with FOUR young. :eek: I tried to rationalise by saying perhaps there were two does with fawns, but he is adamant that the one mother had four little ones running with her. Assuming he is correct, is this a rare but sometimes seen event, or a one off? :???:
Mark.
 

sp4rkman

Well-Known Member
#16
The BDS recommend the shooting of heavily pregnant does as it's the only way you can be sure there is no dependant fawn. It's not nice to do but as has been said before - is it about management or sport?

Muntjac usually only give birth to a single fawn but i guess twins are more than possible.

(Guess who just did their DSC1.....)
 

The Mole

Well-Known Member
#19
buckup said:
A mate was out on our small patch at the weekend, he says he saw a munty doe with FOUR young. :eek: I tried to rationalise by saying perhaps there were two does with fawns, but he is adamant that the one mother had four little ones running with her. Assuming he is correct, is this a rare but sometimes seen event, or a one off? :???:
Mark.
If it's true, a squadron of pigs will soon pass overhead in V formation .....

Munties only give birth to single young - twin foetuses have been recorded, but incredibly rarely. I don't know of any records of live twins, although I suppose as muntjac are so secretive you can't totally write off the possibility.

If the doe really was the mother of all 4 fawns, it could only realistically be a CWD.

Thinking about it, how well grown were these young, Buckup? And is your mate fairly knowledgeable about deer?
 

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