Muntjac Large Intestine

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Jimmers

Active Member
Being new to this just like some advice on what this is. I'm assuming worms of some description?

This chap was also missing a lower limb, had a chipped tusk and an uneven head in velvet. A hard life! I've seen him limping around previously could he have been born this way or is this likely to be an unfortunate injury at some point?
 

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Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Being new to this just like some advice on what this is. I'm assuming worms of some description?

This chap was also missing a lower limb, had a chipped tusk and an uneven head in velvet. A hard life! I've seen him limping around previously could he have been born this way or is this likely to be an unfortunate injury at some point?
Fat also a half full bladder......Nothing in nature is 100 % symmetrical.....
 

Jimmers

Active Member
THis looks normal, but what worries you. Can you highlight it?

Thanks all. It was just the white bubbly texture on the intestine that interested me. Having not seen much of the insides of a deer up close it feels better to get a second opinion that everything looks as it should and that is just fat deposits :)
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
Thanks all. It was just the white bubbly texture on the intestine that interested me. Having not seen much of the insides of a deer up close it feels better to get a second opinion that everything looks as it should and that is just fat deposits :)
The uneven head (in velvet) is likely to be directly related to the missing leg. Would I be correct in thinking that it's left antler was poor?
 

Jimmers

Active Member
The uneven head (in velvet) is likely to be directly related to the missing leg. Would I be correct in thinking that it's left antler was poor?

A very good guess. I assume these are somehow related strangely? Would be interesting to know what causes that.
 

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baguio

Well-Known Member
A very good guess. I assume these are somehow related strangely? Would be interesting to know what causes that.
It's slightly more than a guess! Don't know why but it's always the opposite side antler affected. I have a boiled out head and preserved back leg from a munty buck I shot myself for training purposes.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
Thanks all. It was just the white bubbly texture on the intestine that interested me. Having not seen much of the insides of a deer up close it feels better to get a second opinion that everything looks as it should and that is just fat deposits :)
It is a bit bobbly, but it's normal.
 

big ears

Well-Known Member
Thanks all. It was just the white bubbly texture on the intestine that interested me. Having not seen much of the insides of a deer up close it feels better to get a second opinion that everything looks as it should and that is just fat deposits :)
That’s intestinal fat. Looking at the rest of the fat around his kidneys he was well fed.
Always good to ask, no one is an expert all the time😁
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
A very good guess. I assume these are somehow related strangely? Would be interesting to know what causes that.
The vets/scientists are not sure/agreed on why an injury on one side of the body will generally throw a malformed antler on the other, the most common theory seems to be that the body directs energy to healing the wound on one side which depletes the energy input to growing the antler on the other, I have also heard another say that they think it is a balance thing - the uneven gait causing an unusual blood supply to the far antler.
 
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