Munty behaviour question

stratts

Well-Known Member
I was out stalking last night and came across a munty doe, unfortunately she saw me just as I saw her, about 60 yards ahead on the side of a ride. She was looking straight at me and started prodding/stamping her front right hoof on the ground. I froze and thought for a second she may hold still long enough for me to get on the sticks as she didn't bolt straight away, but alas off she went, tail high never to be seen again. Also that was the only thing I saw all night so still waiting for my 1st solo deer!

Is the stamping/prodding a normal trait as a warning signal as it's the 1st time I've seen it?

Cheers

Stratts
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
Yes, often see it with muntjac as a typical alarm gesture. If they get suspicious they can stand there and stamp their little feet for quite a long time :D If you keep still for long enough then sometimes you may get lucky and get the chance of a shot, sometimes not. But if they are already suspicious and you make a movement.....

Proves again the old saying "if the deer sees you first the deer has to make a mistake, if you see the deer first you have to make a mistake".

willie_gunn
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
That's what the first muntjac doe was doing that time when you took me stalking for "scientific" purposes. We stood still for about 15-20 minutes just a few metres into the wood, staring at this doe stamping her feet through holes in the undergrowth. Originally, as I couldn't see all of it, I thought that she may have a dependent with her, but it was just nervous, or perhaps trying to scare us off. Which didn't work, we stayed around until she just disappeared.
 

stratts

Well-Known Member
Cheers Willie maybe I should have waited a bit longer before trying to get on the sticks but I don't think it would have mattered tbh. This time I made the mistake, lol!!!
 

pete evans

Well-Known Member
I would also add that once they high tail it they almost never stop to look back, unlike roe. I have only had one muntie run then stop and ive seen a fair few of them.
 

Cyres

Well-Known Member
In my very limited experience the one and only sight of a Muntie is a little white tail bouncing down the centre of the thickest blackthorn hedge. I also agree they never stop for a second look aka fox or roe and they are in my experience sods to shoot, saying that in the summer i was out with number 3 son and we watched a lovely muntie doe for a good 10 mins she passed within 20 yds of us, i was watching through the scope my son had my bins. It was also on a piece of ground where i have never seen one before.

They always leg it when they could be shootable otherwise they ignore you.

By the way they are tough little blighters to skin, however lovely to eat.

D
 
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