Namibia the journey begins. Part one

tusker

Well-Known Member
#1
Hi all, just back from the most amazing hunting trip in Namibia. I will start with the 4 of us meeting at T2 Heathrow. Flying with South African Airways, I have always flown with them as there is no hasle, no extra charge etc, why the **** would you fly BA.
We got there 4 hours before the flight as we all had 2 rifles each to check in. When we arrived at check in there was all ready 7 guys in front of us to check in firearms so I thought good job we got there early.
Checked in and off to Border force to do the rifle check. All was going well until the whole job slowed right up. It turned out that one of the guys in the party of 7 thought it was O.K. to present a photo copy of his firearms cert:cuckoo:
He had actually brought the original but didn't think he needed it so left it in his car, needless to say the car was parked off airport. He was told that no fly matey. now time is kicking on at this point with the porters looking at their watches it was starting to look like we wouldn't get our guns on the flight and this ***** didn't even have the courtesy to apologise to us let alone the other members of his group. Don't know if he made it and don't really care.
Any way we did make it, just. So we are away.
Arrived Jo,berg straight though to international transfers and breakfast.
So we are on the tarmac ready to go but the passenger manifest has mistakes so more delays and then a fault on the aircraft so we actually left for Windhoek 3 hours late.
On arrival got the rifles processed very fast when the policeman arrived unlike S.A. it is just a sheet of A4 with about 7 questions, met our friend on the other side and we were off 3 hours south of Windhoek.
You probably have guessed by now that this journey was also not straight forward as only an hour later fan belt broke and radiator split. We actually got to the farm at 9.15 p.m. Dinner and lots of red wine calmed us all down and off to bed about midnight. except for 2.
So we are now in the middle of Namibia,s wilderness eagerly awaiting to hunt 10,000 hectres of totally wild game.
Part 2 , The hunt , to follow
Tusker
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
#6
Namibia Part 2.
Day 1 hunting on Peters farm. Early rise and check zero and away we go . Peter has 10,000 hectres south of Windhoek and farms 1000 sheep and a couple hundred goats so he likes to keep the local wildlife to reasonable level. There are no high fences here so all the game comes and goes as it likes. We shoot from a Toyota hi lux and I know that some of you will think oh no! but if you saw the terrain and vegetation or lack of it, it would be impossible to walk and stalk and It was a cull hunt.
Oryx and Springbok spotted and Chris is first to shoot and the springbok offers the best chance about 150 yrds drops to the shot we are away.
Almost all the shooting is about 200 yards or more and my first chance is an Oryx all of that. Boom 30-06 sends 165 grains of Noslers finest a good hit, the oryx stumbles forward its shoulder broken, but runs with the herd over a small hill Peter guns the hi lux and now its like "Top Gear" with guns. We round a corner and can see the herd starting to slow , we approach and Peter says to just get a bullet in to it however as we get closer they take off again so I take him on the move and he rolls over job done but I must try harder to get the first shot on the money.
All the other guys take game on the first day and we retire to the lodges by the river for beer , wine and a most fabulous dinner of Oryx steaks. We can now relax by the fire pit and open more brilliant wine.
So day 2 and when it comes to my turn we think we are looking for Springbok but out of nowhere a brace of Kudu bulls spring up run about 150 yards maybe more then they stop and look back at us this time I am bang on the money and I have a nice Kudu bull. Home for lunch.
That afternoon I decide to take the 243 as I fancy a chance at the Springbok however when it is my turn to shoot we come across a Warthog and he takes off but turns and comes up against a stock fence he tries to barge through it but backs off and I have my chance probably 150 yrds , no farther and the 243 drops him on the spot with a 85 grain Sierra Game king .
Next day much of the same with Springbok , Oryx being taken. I again brought out the 243 hoping for a Springbok. when it comes to my turn to shoot I am presented with a herd of about 20+ Oryx. One is standing perfectly sideways on, my mate ranged it at 190 metres I aim for a high neck shot about 3-4 inches behind the ear and sqweaze, crack and the Oryx folds on the spot without a twitch. Everyone is now in no doubt what a 243 can do.
So now it is time to pack for the next part of the adventure and onwards for about 3 hours to Okaturua were we have appointments with Eland, Zebra and Baboons.
Tusker
 

kieran222

Well-Known Member
#12
Enjoying the read. Sounds like you have plenty of oryx there and nice to be hunting on low fenced land knowing that everything is 100% wild.
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
#13
Part 3 Eland.
We arrive at Okaturua about 12.30 p.m. this will be walk and stalk. We travel about 3-4 miles off the main road down dusty tracks. The first thing we notice are the amount of baboons. We are greeted by Mieka the daughter of the owner. Her husband ,Henner, is on business but wont be long. We are shown to our rooms and the standard is very impressive all with on suite bathrooms "big enough to play base ball in". And so to lunch or dinner if like me you have northern roots.
Henner arrives all 6 foot 6 of him an huge guy but very warm. We agree that we go for an evening stalk and meet up at about 3.30 p.m.As I wanted to zero the 30-06. I bought a box of RWS 180 grain specialy for the Eland. First shot at 100 yards was 1 inch above the bull bloody hell happy days. We hunt 2 guys with 1 P.H. my friend and I with Henner the other 2 with his worker who is also a P.H. Andreas definitly bush man his tracker also bush man is Johanous.
I agree that my friend should have the opertunity to shoot first. We get close to eland but no cigar getting dark so home for beer and wine. One of the other chaps gets a Zebra.
IMG_1058.jpg next morning we get to a high point to spot game and that is quite a task as we are in the middle of 14000 hectres of unfenced wilderness apart from low stock fences. Soon my eyes spot movement and it is eland Henner too has them so off we go cut this short we got busted twice and I still don't know how such a massive animal can just disappear and be so elusive.

We get back to the farm for late lunch to be met by my friends they are like a dog with perverbial as they had shot 2 baboons from the garden while having their lunch. They then are off for their afternoon hunt and I notice baboons about 400 metres away in some trees and sitting on top of a water tank. I grab the 243 which has already got the bi-pod on. I get to about 280 metres lay down on the track settle behind my CZ I can see 2 in the tree and aim at the one on the left Crack! he drops like stone and the rest scarpering in seconds.
No luck on the Eland that evening But my friend with Andreas comes home with an Eland cow much celabration.
Next day we swap P.H. and partners as the other 2 had taken their animals. Well we climbed a cliff to get a view and we see straight away Eland and Oryx with a couple of warthogs there is also a troop of baboons making their way to the area. Lots of observing on our part and we also notice a huge Kudu bull. The eland wonder off a few hundred yards and lay down. Andreas says that stalking to them is not a good idea as they would see our approach so we go for early lunch.
2 p.m. see,s us back out to the same spot and you guessed it not a bloody eland to be seen.....or so I thought, Andreas spots them bloody miles away! Back to the truck load up with water this is going to be tough.
Well after 2 hours we got busted as the wind changed at the point we were only about 200 yards away. we go to a cliff climb it and spot them again Game on! By now I am out of water and my hands and fore arms are scratched to hell and I am thinking it is just not going to be my trip for eland when Andreas beckons me close to him. I quickly and quietly move to him and I am greated with a big smile the eland are about 150 yards in amongst the trees etc. I recon we have about 40 minutes of daylight left as he puts the sticks up. I cannot see its head or its arse and my sight zone is like threading a needle through the trees he is happy for me to take the shot so I try to place the shot as far forward as I can without hitting a tree. Boom its a hit she jumps and spins round then trots off 20 feet and stands still Andreas is happy with the shot placement and we wait. About 10 minutes later she wobbles and lays down I think I have shot her in the lung. we walk round and closer so that I have a good view of her shoulder and it is slightly forward giving me perfect heart shot at about 70 yards I sqweese the trigger and one of the most intence and physically demanding stalks is over. You all know how it feels.
Turns out my first shot was a little back but got her lung.
I will sum up our week tomorrow.
Tusker
 

Trufflehunting

Well-Known Member
#15
Is there a reason you don't hunt with just the 30-06 then you are ready for anything
You can guarantee if you have .243 then something bigger will come along
Guess .243 is good for baboons at the homestead
What do the Namibians generally shoot with
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
#18
Is there a reason you don't hunt with just the 30-06 then you are ready for anything
You can guarantee if you have .243 then something bigger will come along
Guess .243 is good for baboons at the homestead
What do the Namibians generally shoot with
The reason I took the 243 was for Springbok and Baboons. I only took the Warthog and Oryx because they presented a very good broadside I would have passed up if they did not. I would certainly not have tried at the Kudu or the Eland even though I know they have been taken with the 243. The PH owner had a 7 mm rem mag. Andreas had a 30-06.
Tusker
 
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dodgyknees

Well-Known Member
#19
The reason I took the 243 was for Springbok and Baboons. I only took the Warthog and Oryx because they presented a very good broadside I would have passed up if they did not. I would certainly not have tried at the Kudu or the Eland even though I know they have been taken with the 243. The PH owner had a 7 mm rem mag. Andreas had a 30-06.
Tusker
I think you've provided an excellent demonstration of the precision use of the .243 Winchester. Bloody good ones. A mix of game from the largish varmint, to the medium ungulate. Which is precisely what the .243 Winchester was designed to achieve. To quote Sierra "...the 243 was intended to serve as a true dual-purpose varmint / deer cartridge... tremendously versatile... well suited to game from varmints to mule deer..." It goes on to talk about the requirement for placement and the need to pass up questionable or less-than-perfect shots. You placed your shots at between 150-300yds and achieved instant incapacitation. The Oryx weighs an average of 175lbs, the Mule Deer 200lbs. Perfect!
 

kieran222

Well-Known Member
#20
All the game including Zebra is totally wild not a fence in sight other than low stock fence.
Tusker
Very interesting. Is there some sort of management plan agreed between the farms, i.e. how do they ensure that the animals aren't wiped out by people who might only be thinking about the financial side rather than the preservation of the wild animals?
 

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