Available: Namibian Leopards, latest information

Waterbuck

Well-Known Member
Scientists have just completed an extensive study into Leopard numbers and distribution across Namibia. The field work took 18 months and was supported by MEFT (Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism) with collaboration from WWF Namibia, Namibian Chamber of Environment, NAPHA (Namibian Professional Hunters Association) and CANAM (Conservancies Association of Namibia). The study was peer reviewed locally by Dr Morgan Hauptfleisch as well as the University of The Free State, SA, plus two other people, one based in Germany and one in the UK. Most data were obtained via trail-cams and to a lesser extent eye-witness reports. The study concluded that there are an estimated 11,800 Leopard living wild in Namibia with a possible deviation of 13%. Interestingly, one of the contentious points of the survey was the reliance of trail-cam sightings rather than eye-witnesses. It was suggested that had more effort been put into contacting professionals in a position to report on sightings first-hand then the estimated number of Leopard in Namibia could be more than 17,000.

There was a huge variation in population density and I am pleased to report that one of my favourite areas to hunt in Namibia turns out to hold by far the highest number of Leopard in the country. In fact, our “home” hunting area is slap bang in the middle of the highest density recorded!

At present there are only 250 Leopard tags issued each year. Whilst we are fully booked on Leopard for 2021 I would be happy to put anyone that is interested on a waiting list. Whilst no one can ever guarantee a successful hunt, don’t get caught out, go where there is a proven thriving population of these incredible animals.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
That's really good to hear. A healthy population of predators is indicative of a healthy ecosystem. I suspect that the 250 Tags issued each year have very strict conditions attached to what can actually be shot, with hefty fees attached to the tag and even heftier fees in the event you shoot the wrong thing. I was out there two years ago and want to get back again sooner rather than later.
 

Waterbuck

Well-Known Member
That's really good to hear. A healthy population of predators is indicative of a healthy ecosystem. I suspect that the 250 Tags issued each year have very strict conditions attached to what can actually be shot, with hefty fees attached to the tag and even heftier fees in the event you shoot the wrong thing. I was out there two years ago and want to get back again sooner rather than later.
Yes you are right. However, with a top PH you won't be shooting the wrong animal, large mature males only! They are very easy to identify.
 

Rhodesianjess

Well-Known Member
I'm willing to bet you a pound that's there's more than that in country. As a cattle rancher in Rhodesia, I learnt early on that leopard is not only one of the most dangerous things in the bundu, he's also the most difficult to find. A true predator, camouflage expert and expert hunter.
Not my favourite cat but what an amazing animal.
 

Waterbuck

Well-Known Member
I'm willing to bet you a pound that's there's more than that in country. As a cattle rancher in Rhodesia, I learnt early on that leopard is not only one of the most dangerous things in the bundu, he's also the most difficult to find. A true predator, camouflage expert and expert hunter.
Not my favourite cat but what an amazing animal.
Yes these critters certainly keep us on our toes!
 

Rhodesianjess

Well-Known Member
The problem with them is they kill loads of baboon and vervet. So if you muff the shot and he comes, watch out friend!
Top of your head chewed,back legs pull your insides out. We're only upright monkeys!
Best medicine is big loopers in a shotgun if you're in bush or kopjes. Or shoot straight first time 😂
 

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