national geographic article on hunting in the states

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#2
A very good article and excellent pictures. Hunters world wide only want the same thing it seems, to enjoy the wilds and their prey and conserve them both!
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#3
We were quite pleased with this article. For once the mainstream press took a positive approach toward hunting and what hunters do.

It was a nice thing to see.

GSG
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#4
I must say, I've seen alot of hunting programmes and articles coming out of the USA. I thought that alot of it was more about shooting things,'big guns versus big animals' 'kick ass rock music' and 'Lock and Load'. All a bit Gung ho for me!
The press in the States must make a field day of this! Rather a home goal for the hunters I think.
I'm glad that these DVDs and such like are not the real face of American hunting.
Natural Geographic has helped restore the balance and shown what its is really all about.
I hope one day to get across the pond and have a go at some Whitetail Deer and enjoy the stunning scenery, not to mention some of that famous American hospitality!
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#5
There are American hunters who do the "lock and load" I'm too tough for my gun sort of thing, but they're in the majority. Most hunters in America, as in the rest of the world, want to help control animal populations, enjoy the outdoors, and add some meat to their freezer.

Unfortunately, it is often the "lock and load" type of hunter who gets all the attention. Guess those types just make a better story.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#6
I think your'e right Gunslinger, I've seen an American film about shot placement in deer. A woman hunter is going after a White Tail Deer, as it reaches the summit of a hill with no back stop just blue skies; she ask the hunter guide "Shall I shoot it up the ass?" "Yeah go ahead" is his answer. I very messed up deer tumbles down the canyon many feet below. Very sad. And thats an 'Offical' deer hunting video! I can't believe it.
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#7
Actually I just reread my previous post, and I should have said the "lock and load" hunters are in the minority, not the majority. :oops:

I know and work with a lot of hunters and they are all people who hunt with skill and care, and who want to cause the animals they take as little suffering as possible. All of them are very aware that everything they do reflects on the image of hunters in general, and so they conduct themselves well. I think most American hunters behave in this manner.

Television shows, however, are a different matter. Television, whether it concerns hunting or not, is about ratings. Most hunters I know violently dislike most hunting programs, because they feel they're not real, and they don't accurately depict hunting. So I wouldn't judge American hunters by what you see on hunting programs or videos.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#8
Yeah I know what you mean Gunslinger. Thanks to TV most Americans think that its always foggy in London, that we (The Brits) are all very polite and talk in 'Dick Van Dyke' style 'cockney' accents;" Gorrr blimey don't you naaah Gav-na!" :lol:

We don't by the way! I blame Scooby doo! :???:
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#9
I tend to watch more British comedy, so I always thought all Brits spoke like the people in the Monty Python movies.

It's the same thing with Americans though. If you watch American television or movies, you'd think all the men were violent, all the women were hormonal, and we all blow up cars and buildings all the time.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#10
Although I have not read or seen the article I can honestly say that after many years of taking mostly Americans hunting/stalking in the UK and Africa I have only had a handful that were a problem.

99% of my clientel are American, and I have been very fortunate to have made some great friendships, had some great times. Most Americans are good hunters, ethical, honest and also fascinated by the amount and variety of deer we have in the UK. They are also taken back by the amount of wild countryside still to be found in such a small country, and of course the history.

Most have a good sense of humour, and all round I have little to complain about. But maybe I have been lucky? On the other hand I know a few English people who I wouldnt call hunters/stalkers, and we are all aware of someone like that I am sure. In general I find that with most hunting people there is a common bond, no matter which country you come from.

Long may it remain so.
 
#11
I've got to agree with you about that. Hunters always seem to find common ground, no matter what or where they hunt. I think that's a lovely thing, and I second your wish that it remains that way.

Someday I hope to make it over to your side of the pond. I've always been interested in English history and I'm sure I'd have great fun touring all the historic sites.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#12
Hi Guns,
I'm sure that if you do get over here you will have plenty of people from this site willing to show you around and do some hunting. But can you do us a favour let us know when you are coming over so you can do some shopping in Cabelas for us! :eek: :D
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
#13
I am always amazed at the way any perceived barriers or initial difficulties are overcome when meeting people for the first time, and hunting is discovered as the mutual interest. This combined with how small the world is now, because of modern travel, is always surprising me.

I was in Montana a couple of years back, visiting my friend and hunting prairie dogs. I got introduced to the man whose ranch we were shooting on, it turned out that he was an ex-seviceman, matelot Mr B, had spent a lot of time in the UK and declared his best friend in all the world came from Newcastle upon Tyne. We spoke for a while about different places in the UK, he was very knowledgeable about beer. We moved on to hunting and his prairie dog problem. The upshot was my pal was going to teach him to reload and shooting privileges were extended to cover the whole ranch and Anteleope and Mule deer, in season with tags of course.

My friend said he had never had such an in depth conversation with the ranch owner, he has had many since, and was delighted with his additional shooting ground. So there you are a real demonstration of barriers being broken instantly by "hunters" having a common interest, and a shared love of beer ;)

John
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#14
I'll keep that in mind Beowulf. It's always fun to see new places with people who know them.

John,

A shared love a beer (or wine) can cement a lot of friendships. Did you enjoy Montana? It's a beautiful state.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#15
I totally agree JayB, when I was in the forces I met people from all over the world. Canadians, Yanks, Russians, Gibraltarians, Falkland Islanders. I even met and liked some French people! The thing with all these people was the fact that they either hunted, fished, were ex or serving members of the military or police, or they just loved the great outdoors. It was the best bit about my job.
Since leaving the Forces I find most people I meet are grey and rather boring and have sad little lives watching tv soaps or football!
Its really been the fact that I found this site that I am able to talk to more 'worldly' intelligent people again. I'm also getting to meet many of the people off this site! Its a pity we haven't got more international members. Apart from Gunslinger and Capstick how else is 'Johnny foreigner?' :lol:
Hi Gunslinger,
You are very welcome to my neck of the woods anytime. I'm a Warwickshire man born and breed, home of William Shakespeare and George Elliot. Very nice countryside and castles and stuff and thanks to our 'colonial' exploits, some very good 'Curry houses'!
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#16
Thanks Beowulf. I'm a big Shakespeare fan, so that would be really interesting. I'm not sure how big a fan of curry I am though. It is possible, I suppose, that it just isn't made properly here. Nothern Michigan is not exactly a hotbed of foreign cuisine.

As to the international members, I've been working to get some of the American hunters I know to stop by and have a chat. Guess I'll have to bring up the subject again.

GSG
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#17
Hi Gunslinger,
I think that your curry problem comes down to America having the wrong type of 'Indians'. 'North American Native Indians' where as we have Indians from India and they can really cook a curry! :lol:
You are right though about rubbish curries in the States. I had a Green Crab curry in Annapolis, it was dreadful!
Shakespeares okay but he hasn't written a book for ages! I'm more into Tolkien.
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#18
Tolkein hasn't written anything for ages either.

I'm more of a Terry Pratchett fan myself. Love his books!

I think you're right that part of the curry problem is the lack of people who know how to cook it well. In the larger cities you might be more apt to get a good curry. I live in a relatively small town, so no curries for us. We do have some surprisingly good Chinese and Mexican food though.

In Michigan, the native cuisine is fudge, smoked fish and pasties. I believe the last item was imported from Cornwall. They're a huge favorite among people in the Upper Peninsula.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
#19
Hi Guns, Cornwall has had smoked fish, fudge as well as pasties in its history! You don't have 'Star Gazy Pie' in Michigan do you?

Were the Cornish there for the mining I wonder? I had never thought of large numbers of West Country people emigrating to the USA until I watched an episode of 'Deadwood'. In it they had a group of Cornish miners, speaking in there native Cornish tongue. Very intersting. My mothers side of the family are from Cornwall, do you have any families with the surname 'Maunder' in your community?
 

Gunslingergirl

Well-Known Member
#20
Never heard of Star Gazy pie. Guess we must have missed that one.

There were, are still are I believe, copper and coal mines in the Upper Peninsula. If I remember my history, miners did come from Cornwall to work the mines. That's how pasties were introduced to the U.P. They're much more prevalent above the bridge than below it where I live.

As to the surname Maunder, I don't recognize it, but then I don't live in the Upper Peninsula. Would be interesting to do a little research and see what I could find.
 

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