Neck shots?

Number8

Well-Known Member
I've always done boiler house shots, this season I've tried a couple of neck shots. Both stone dead, but I think there's more meat lost. Probably go back to the boiler house. Nobody misses a couple of ribs but there are a decent couple of burgers in a neck.
Any thoughts?
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
I seldom take neck shots because it's more risky. I dont get penalised for meat loss if I am shooting professionally. My preference is through the shoulders, it's quicker to get onto and bigger. If I am shooting a beast privately then I prefer to take a head shot rather neck because at least there are definite aim points compare to the neck. The neck meat does make good stews
 

homer

Well-Known Member
I prefer a neck shot, yes its a smaller target than a chest shot but on a red its still fairly large, as long as im within a certain distance, and on the bipod, thats my chosen aim point. I have alot of thick willow and wind bush areas, the neck shot saves me going looking for them, and when on the hinds, it means I can drop 3 or 4 at once and not wonder where the hell they all are.
 

muddy42

Well-Known Member
Just be aware of the relative sizes of the vital zones (where a quick death results). The vital zone of the head or neck is about 20% of the area of the vital zone in the chest and shoulder area.
 

charlieboy-shooter

Well-Known Member
Don’t worry about meat loss, pick a shot that knocks them down wherever you feel confident. More meat lost if the deer runs off or worst is injured and runs off.
Unfortunately I have to agree to this by learning the hard way.
Neck shot a fallow doe at last light, near boundary and not much scope for a follow up shot if needed. Hence the choice of shot. Banker shot at 60yds right. Wrong. Shot in neck went straight down. Reloaded, still down, bit of leg movement but nothing to suggest I needed a follow up shot. Due to the low light. Thought I’d have a quick look through the thermal. To my horror she was up and then in an unsafe position by the time I got the gun back up on her. So in truth I shouldn’t have taken the shot due to the limited options and low light if it went wrong. And wrong it did.
Had to contact the land owners and ask if they had contact details of the land it entered. After a few hours of searching. No carcass, No deer. Back next day. Nothing. Never have found out the outcome. Which still bothers me. So I lost a lot of meat that day but more importantly I wounded a deer which probably had a slow death.
I’m not saying don’t neck shoot. Shoot them where you like but it’s a awful feeling when it goes wrong. Am I embarrassed by it. Yes, but it’s the truth, hence this post. I’d rather lose a shoulder than the entire animal and as I say the not knowing is the worst.
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
I prefer a neck shot, yes its a smaller target than a chest shot but on a red its still fairly large,.

No it's not it's actually a very small target especially if side on 2 inches across at the very most that's a small target at 100/150 yards which is the distance that the majority of Red deer are shot , I will neck shoot front or back but only out to a 100 yards max never side on unless at point blank range, seen too many jaws blown
off or shots through the wind pipe which will result in a dead deer but one you are unlikely to ever find
For a neck shot to be 100% successful you need to hit the spinal column, not so easy do do.
 

homer

Well-Known Member
No it's not it's actually a very small target especially if side on 2 inches across at the very most that's a small target at 100/150 yards which is the distance that the majority of Red deer are shot , I will neck shoot front or back but only out to a 100 yards max never side on unless at point blank range, seen too many jaws blown
off or shots through the wind pipe which will result in a dead deer but one you are unlikely to ever find
For a neck shot to be 100% successful you need to hit the spinal column, not so easy do do.
Ok fair enough, its still my preferred point if aim. Prone, on bipod, anything within 200yds gets it.
You are correct, you dont have a lot of room for error, and I would never shoot if I wasn't confident of hitting the spot.
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
LOVE the neck shot, from the front, back or side, close in, far out or in between,
its the guaranteed muttsnutsneverfailsonehundredandtwentypercentabsolutelyperfect solution to all your bullet placement issues, always.
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
LOVE the neck shot, from the front, back or side, close in, far out or in between,
its the guaranteed muttsnutsneverfailsonehundredandtwentypercentabsolutelyperfect solution to all your bullet placement issues, always.
Of course but you didn’t mention (in one word) “copper”!

K
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Of course but you didn’t mention (in one word) “copper”!

K

My friend “ copper” is the super glue that holds my entire firearms philosophy together.
Without it I would wander through the ballistic wilderness aimless and without purpose.
It wasn’t always thus, but I’ve seen the light, the toxic heaviness has dropped from my soul, I am an enlightened evangelising angel come to lead you all down the shining path of righteousness and low terminal performance..
 
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