new to reloading: advice on powder for Creedmoor

palo

Well-Known Member
My mate is getting 2650 fps from his creedmoor with the 143 eldx bullet.
His barrel is a bartlein finished at 20 inches.
He is using the book max load of 40.5 grains of R16.
That's with lapua brass
 
Last edited:

Mungo

Well-Known Member
Thank you again, everyone. Extremely useful information.

Now another (probably stupid) question: how likely is it that a load that works in a 20” barrel will also work in a 26” barrel?

The only reason it think it’s not a completely stupid question is that the factory Precision Hunter 143gr groups very well in both guns, so at least theoretically it seems like a single load could work in both.
 
Last edited:

palo

Well-Known Member
It might or it might not, you will just have to try it to see.
When I had my 6.5x55 I worked up a load that also worked in 4 other rifles.
They were all sako and tikka rifles though.
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Reload data is only as good as the combo set its tested in as a guide ,so what is fast in one setup on that day or test bed may be slow in another rifle setup or better! testing and working up to the load that is best in your rifle is the way to go and the one that you can only rely upon.
Hope that helps ist reloading so much fun lol
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
That’s a shame, I’ve got 100 cases of Hornady Precision Hunter brass I was going to start with!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Don't weep too much. I've got some Hornady brass that I've reloaded 6 or 7 times using Hornady's 140 grain Match loading of H4350. ~Muir
 

TASR12

Well-Known Member
Don't weep too much. I've got some Hornady brass that I've reloaded 6 or 7 times using Hornady's 140 grain Match loading of H4350. ~Muir
Good to know. One box of factory left by which time my dies should have arrived.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Thank you again, everyone. Extremely useful information.

Now another (probably stupid) question: how likely is it that a load that works in a 20” barrel will also work in a 26” barrel?

The only reason it think it’s not a completely stupid question is that the factory Precision Hunter 143gr groups very well in both guns, so at least theoretically it seems like a single load could work in both.
It's a bit like any factory ammo. A good accurate load will tend to work well in most rifles, and an accurate rifle will tend work well with most ammo. Use a ladder test and pick a node where several slightly different loads all group together and chances are that will be pretty tolerant of different rifles.

Of course you can use lots of measuring equipment, record lots of data and then do lots of statistical analysis, but I have found a good crimp does sort out a lot of inconsistencies
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
Just about to try Reloader 16 looks a good replacement for IMR4350 as IMR 4451 still is't in my local dealers :doh: as I don't wish to continue with the Hot loads from RS60 .
 

Marcher

Well-Known Member
Just noticed written somewhere, that all Rel. powders are double based, and all Ball powders are double based. People keep saying that double based powders are barrel burners, but is this so ? A lot of the more modern ones have " inhibitors" in them that are supposed to overcome this problem . Can someone update me on the reality please.
 

Miki

Well-Known Member
Just noticed written somewhere, that all Rel. powders are double based, and all Ball powders are double based. People keep saying that double based powders are barrel burners, but is this so ? A lot of the more modern ones have " inhibitors" in them that are supposed to overcome this problem . Can someone update me on the reality please.
Double base powders have added Nitroglycerin whereas Single base are Nitrocellulose only. DB powders burn quicker than SB powders which produces a faster rise (peak) pressure. The high temperature causes the erosion. The longer that high temp' is maintained the more erosion occurs. Pretty much all modern DB powders are treated to inhibit their burn temperature, which makes them 'dirtier' than SB powders and are no more likely to cause throat erosion than SB.
A small charge of a fast burning powder is ideal for light bullets at moderate speeds, SB or DB while a larger charge of a slower powder is better for heavier bullets regardless of the powder type (SB or DB).

A fast burning powder behind a small bullet (say a .224 in a rifle chambered in .223) is good if you loaded a slower burning powder to produce the same peak pressure it would burn longer so you would get faster velocity.
SB powders are less dense than DB so the same 'charge' will have a different volume. To get your bullet moving and accelerating to the desired MV you may not have enough case capacity for a SB powder.

To get the .308 bullet to move at the same speed of the .224 you would need a lot more powder to generate more energy (the cross sectional area is larger and the bullet heavier). Using a fast burning (ie DB) powder the rise in pressure and temp' would be higher and you would 'burn' the throat, use a slower burning powder and the pressure (and temperature) spike would be lower and last longer. Using either a Single or Double base powder to increase velocity will cause more erosion than maintaining a moderate velocity, like all things reloading it's a trade off.
 

Marcher

Well-Known Member
Thanks Miki. It seems quite complicated. But basically , if you don't chase the ultimate velocity, they are similar.
 

Top