Not seen any Roe twins.

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badbob

Well-Known Member
A little dissappointed, the two does I`ve seen this week only had single fawns.
They usually always have twins. Not sure why , weather, foxes, dogs ?
Hope they look after them.
 

uptonogood

Well-Known Member
Farmer I know swears blind he’s has triplets but yet to see them for myself .The delayed silage cut in some parts will hopefully see the kids up and about before first cut .I know some have started cutting but here it seems to be delayed as grass is not ready yet .
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
I was fortunate to see new born twins couched up in a pine forest on 14th May this year. I have also seen triplets twice in the same strip of woodland with, I assume the same doe two years running!
 

nick100

Well-Known Member
A doe here has had triplets for the last two years running.
Not see any fawns yet this time.
 

Malxwal

Well-Known Member
West Aberdeenshire, twins spotted bouncing about this week, well on too.
Noticed first cut of silage on a couple parks elsewhere today too, although the grass isnt very high yet.
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
Other than in the Highlands where we had a long run of hard weather Jan-Mar most does should be throwing twins this year.

Remember that the doe will often get them to lay up in different places and suckle them separately. I generally find single kids laid up in the cover. A bit later in June when they are following the doe more I'm often relieved to see twins at her heals.

The other factor would be where you have a lot of silage fields, with the cold March and April silage was late this year so a lot of mowing going on now, peak roe calving time rather than a few weeks back.
 

badbob

Well-Known Member
Yes I was hoping there might be another twin lying up somewhere, the two I saw this week were very young ,but following the doe.
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Farmer I know swears blind he’s has triplets but yet to see them for myself .The delayed silage cut in some parts will hopefully see the kids up and about before first cut .I know some have started cutting but here it seems to be delayed as grass is not ready yet .
We had triplets on one piece of ground last year.
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
Your cull demographic will also have an impact, if you don’t cull healthy middle aged does in the winter months you will have more twins. Young does start with single fawns based on what I see, and older Does (depending on health and ability to look after them) might often have single fawns. If you cull correctly and leave the prime breeders, you will have more twin fawns as well.
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Your cull demographic will also have an impact, if you don’t cull healthy middle aged does in the winter months you will have more twins. Young does start with single fawns based on what I see, and older Does (depending on health and ability to look after them) might often have single fawns. If you cull correctly and leave the prime breeders, you will have more twin fawns as well.
So if that’s the case, if your prime cull aim is population reduction you should target the prime breeders?
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Food availability and nutritional quality, for both the pre-conceiving doe, throughout the carrying term and right to the eventual birth and raising of the offspring will have a marked impact on the body weights and condition of the kids; also, is it better to have one healthy kid or two which are less well fed? This latter question, population management objectives apart, is of course is very much a habitat quality-influenced aspect, though for many lowland areas is of somewhat lesser importance, there usually being plenty of good quality forage. Deer come and deer go over time, but the ‘best’ does are best owing to their chosen range, which is usually more fixed by the underlying mineral and trace element availability, and these does are more able to raise decent progeny in these better feeding areas, whereas the lesser animals will make do on lower-grade foraging areas; accordingly, and depending on the objective and quantities to be removed, there should be wiggle room to focus efforts according to the desired outcome/s.
 

caberslash

Well-Known Member
Deer come and deer go over time, but the ‘best’ does are best owing to their chosen range, which is usually more fixed by the underlying mineral and trace element availability, and these does are more able to raise decent progeny in these better feeding areas, whereas the lesser animals will make do on lower-grade foraging areas; accordingly, and depending on the objective and quantities to be removed, there should be wiggle room to focus efforts according to the desired outcome/s.

Triplets from a doe shot this year, hefted to a nice and quiet riparian zone. Mum weighed 16kg lardered!

IMG-20210605-WA0001.jpg

Judging by her condition, I think they would have been born strong kids.

A bit sad when you think about it, but a reality of deer management!
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
Was always told that twins was a sign your does are in good health, could they have been stressed hence the singles?
From what I have seen and read I think it's mainly feed related so that is A. quality and B. quantity. Where I was stalking this week in the hills of Perthshire all does on the hill had/have single young and lower down in the fenced plantations mainly twins. Ronnie Rose at Eskdalemuir used to say if you have single kids you need to up your cull.
 

NickJ

Well-Known Member
Food availability and nutritional quality, for both the pre-conceiving doe, throughout the carrying term and right to the eventual birth and raising of the offspring will have a marked impact on the body weights and condition of the kids; also, is it better to have one healthy kid or two which are less well fed? This latter question, population management objectives apart, is of course is very much a habitat quality-influenced aspect, though for many lowland areas is of somewhat lesser importance, there usually being plenty of good quality forage. Deer come and deer go over time, but the ‘best’ does are best owing to their chosen range, which is usually more fixed by the underlying mineral and trace element availability, and these does are more able to raise decent progeny in these better feeding areas, whereas the lesser animals will make do on lower-grade foraging areas; accordingly, and depending on the objective and quantities to be removed, there should be wiggle room to focus efforts according to the desired outcome/s.
Any hill shepherd would agree with that
 
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