Oil in bore

DL

Well-Known Member
http://www.varminthunter.org/article2.shtml

I am not sure if one of my rifles is affected in the way described in this article.
Will experiment to find out. I run a clean patch through a couple of times to remove oil before firing, but may use lighter fluid as has been described on here to see if there's any difference to groups.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
This guy is chasing his tail. He should quit cleaning his rifle so often and forget all the fancy solvents. I am surprised that fellows like him don't develop ulcers every time they go to the range. ~Muir
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: , Don't think I could shoot alongside that chap, but I would recommend him for work in the operating theatre, definately no risk of MRSA :lol: :lol: Steve.
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
I know just where he needs a "dry patch" running through :evil: I wonder how much hunting Mr fancy groups does, he would drive me mad.

John
 

Dalua

Well-Known Member
I push some clean patches through my rifles (and shotguns) before shooting, but then they're always put away clean and oiled inside and out.

I guess if your rifle/gun is not put away clean and oiled, then you don't need to wipe the oil out before firing.
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
Anschutz used to say that for their match rifles, a single scant drop of oil on a patch, followed by patches until clean and dry. Oil coverage should be measured in microns, not ounces!!

Over oiling can ruin a good rifle.~Muir
 

Bob

Well-Known Member
When I get flyers in a group, which I believe are not down to me pulling the shot, then I check out the batch with a chronograph and also for consistent bullet seating depth, length to ogive and for run-out. If these factors and the velocity of the flyers are consistent with others of that group, i.e. the accurate rounds, then the faulty lies with the shooter, the scope mounting, the rifle or the scope and possibly in that order.

According to a bench rest shooter and a custom riflesmith who I am acquainted with lighter fluid leaves a very small amount of residual oil when it dries off - use it for cleaning and lubricating the trigger mechanism.

If you oil your rifle barrel (I do) then before you shoot then wipe the barrel out with meths/industrial alcohol to take out the oil. It works for me but then I started with a new barrel, broke it in and kept to the cleaning regime advised by Riflecraft.

If your rifle is accurate (according to your own definition of accuracy) stick with your cleaning regime.

Check out the cleaning regimes advised by the various custom barrel makers and make your own decision.

IMHO if you seldom clean your barrel and when you do you require several fouling shots to regain accuracy (assuming you have removed any residual oil or cleaning fluids from the barrel) then I would suspect some pitting on other minor defects in the barrel which require to be filled with fouling or copper to regain accuracy again.

Do what you need to do to achieve accuracy, this can be embarrassing as if your mate can shoot better groups with your equipment without fliers then it's down to you!

If the group including the flyers is small enough for you to shoot and kill your quarry at your normal hunting ranges then don't worry to much, the rifle is fit for purpose and should not let you down. Putting holes in paper is only a means to an end for stalking/hunting purposes.

By the way when I start to clean my rifle I use meths on the first one or two patches before using expensive cleaners to clean out the carbon/copper fouling. Very effective and cheap!


Bob
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
Muir said:
Anschutz used to say that for their match rifles, a single scant drop of oil on a patch, followed by patches until clean and dry. Oil coverage should be measured in microns, not ounces!!

Over oiling can ruin a good rifle.~Muir
Hey Muir, don't know if your'e aware of the weather we are having the last couple weeks, pass the cosmoline will ya! :D
 

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